Somerville Board of Well being Votes In opposition to COVID Vaccine Passport-Fashion System – CBS Boston

SOMERVILLE (CBS) — The city of Somerville will not adopt a COVID vaccine passport-style system used in Boston and other communities.

On Thursday evening, the city’s health department rejected the proposal by a score of two to one.

CONTINUE READING: DA: Tyngsboro Police tried to stop a car from a fatal accident involving a garbage truck

In a statement, Somerville Mayor Katjana Ballantyn said that while she disagreed with the committee’s decision, she respected the considerations that went into it.

“The key takeaway from last night’s hearing is that the board and the city agree that vaccination is critical to getting this virus under control.

CONTINUE READING: Bryan Purdie held without bail in Falmouth for alleged home invasion and kidnapping

The question for us is which tools we use to drive this goal forward. Of course, we had hoped that the Board would support the proposed requirement, but I respect their decision and their thoughtful consideration, so today we move on to the next effort. My focus remains fully on applying all the strategies at our disposal to deal with the pandemic.

Since day one in office, I’ve had staff doubling down to increase access to testing, masks, vaccines, information, and financial and health support. This decision will not slow us down, it will only give additional impetus to our efforts to fight the virus on all fronts.”

MORE NEWS: ‘ERs are bursting at the seams’: Nurses ask for help as experts predict long recovery from COVID

Bostons vaccination order started last Saturday. Anyone entering a Boston restaurant, bar or venue must show at least one first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine.

Newark Doctor and West New York Man Charged with $3.four Million Well being Care and Wire Fraud Conspiracy, Cash Laundering, and Making False Statements | USAO-NJ

CAMDEN, NJ – A Newark physician and West New York man are scheduled to make their initial appearances today on charges of defrauding New Jersey state and local health benefits programs and other insurers out of more than $3.4 million by submitting fraudulent claims for medically unnecessary prescriptions, US Attorney Philip R. Sellinger announced.

Kaival Patel, 53, of West New York, New Jersey, and Saurabh Patel, MD, 51, a Woodbridge, New Jersey resident, are charged in a 12-count indictment with conspiracy to commit health care fraud, and wire fraud and four counts of health care fraud. Kaival Patel is also charged with conspiracy to commit money laundering, substantive counts of money laundering, and making false statements to federal agents. The defendants appeared today by videoconference before US Magistrate Judge Sharon A. King and were released on $250,000 each unsecured bond.

According to the indication:

Kaival Patel and his wife – referred to in the indictment as “Individual 1” – operated a company called ABC Healthy Living LLC (ABC) to market medical products and services, including compound prescription medications. Saurabh Patel is a medical doctor who owns and operates a clinic – referred to in the indictment as “Medical Practice 1” – in Newark. Saurabh Patel is related to Kaival Patel and Individual 1. Paul Camarda, a pharmaceutical sales representative who is listed as a conspirator, pleaded guilty before Judge Kugler in Camden federal court on July 6, 2021, to health care conspiracy and conspiring to commit money laundering and obstruct justice and is awaiting sentencing.

Compounded medications are specialty medications mixed by a pharmacist to meet the specific medical needs of an individual patient. Although compounded drugs are not approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), they are properly prescribed when a physician determines that an FDA-approved medication does not meet the health needs of a particular patient, such as if a patient is allergic to a dye or other ingredient.

Kaival Patel, Saurabh Patel, Camarda, and others learned that certain state and local government employees had insurance that would reimburse up to thousands of dollars for a one-month supply of certain compounded medications. The defendants submitted fraudulent insurance claims for prescription compounded medications to a pharmacy benefits administrator, which provided management services for certain insurance plans that covered state and local government employees. The defendants steered individuals recruited to receive medications from the compounding pharmacies to Saurabh Patel’s medical practice, which enabled him to fraudulently receive insurance payments for those patient visits and procedures. The conduct caused the benefits administrator to pay out $3.4 million in fraudulent claims.

The health care fraud and wire fraud conspiracy count carries a maximum potential penalty of 20 years in prison; the health care fraud charges carry a maximum potential penalty of 10 years in prison; the false statement count carries a maximum penalty of five years in prison – all of these counts are also punishable by a fine of $250,000, or twice the gain or loss from the offense, whichever is greatest. The money laundering charges carry a maximum term of 10 years in prison and a fine of $250,000, or twice the gross gain or loss from the offense or not more than twice the amount of the criminally derived property involved in the transactions.

US Attorney Sellinger credited special agents of the IRS – Criminal Investigation, under the direction of Special Agent in Charge Michael Montanez in Newark; special agents of the FBI’s Atlantic City Resident Agency, under the direction of Special Agent in Charge George M. Crouch Jr. in Newark; and the US Department of Labor Office of Inspector General, New York Region, under the direction of Special Agent in Charge Jonathan Mellone, with the investigation leading to the indictment.

The government is represented by Assistant US Attorneys Christina O. Hud and R. David Walk Jr. of the Criminal Division in Camden.

The charges and allegations contained in the indictment are merely accusations, and the defendants are presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

Measure A cash to fund psychological well being program for Metropolis workers

Over $400,000 of Measure A will be used to help City of Turlock employees take care of their mental well-being after council members approved a contract on Tuesday.

In a 4-1 vote against Deputy Mayor Pam Franco, the city council approved a service agreement between the city and Florida-based company Performance on Purpose during its first meeting of the new year. Responding to a call for proposals prepared at the request of the council, Performance on Purpose is asking for $417,994 to implement a voluntary mental wellbeing program for city employees.

According to the company’s website, Performance on Purpose’s mission is to “equip leaders and their teams with the tools to reach their highest potential by providing science-based behavior change solutions to improve well-being and performance.”

“People understand that mental health is a business-critical conversation that needs to be had, and that people cannot do their jobs unless they are supported by the resources they need,” said Lauren Hodges, co-founder of Performance on Purpose , to the Council. “And that often has to come from the workplace.”

Two other companies also responded to the bid with cost estimates of $293,235 and $197,700 for the mental wellbeing program, but Performance on Purpose was rejected by City employees for its “strong strategy” and use of “the latest science and research to… human performance” recommended. according to the staff report.

Through the program, city tours and staff have the opportunity to participate in a variety of offerings, including live, in-person retreats (guided only), biometric screenings, performance coaching, and a variety of virtual programs on topics such as nutrition, stress management, and meditation, to name a few to name.

The nearly $420,000 bill will be funded with money from Measure A, a citywide sales tax approved by Turlock voters in the November 2020 election that is expected to generate $11 million in annual revenue.

Eight areas were listed in the Measure A Order – “Protecting Turlock’s long-term financial stability, maintaining and restoring public safety services, prompt emergency and medical assistance to 911, fire safety, repairing roads and potholes, supporting local businesses, Addressing challenges of homelessness and vagrancy and protecting Turlock’s ability to respond to emergencies and natural disasters.”

The program was originally intended to be funded by COVID relief funds from the American Rescue Plan Act, but Council Member Andrew Nosrati requested use of Measure A funds instead as the council continues to explore the best ways to use relief funds. In addition, business owners and community members called to express their dissatisfaction with the use of ARPA funds for the program.

“I’m not judging this presentation; It sounds like it could be a good thing,” said Lori Smith, owner of Main Street Antiques. “…But from what I’ve read, it looks to me like this could probably be about 300 people, and so much of it is voluntary…You have no way of knowing how many people it actually is will use… Can we use it? $400,000 so the public can benefit a little more?”

Councilor Nicole Larson expressed hesitation in approving such an agreement without a city manager selected, after which Mayor Amy Bublak assured her that one would be selected in two to four weeks. The original point has also been changed to say that the program will not begin until the new city manager is in place and the new leader will be the one who will work with Performance on Purpose to implement it.

“My values ​​are that as leaders we have a responsibility to ensure our employees are physically and mentally healthy and capable of providing the best service to our constituents,” Bublak said. “…We sit in a time where we are losing a lot of people who no longer want to work because of the things that have happened in COVID… This is our way of showing them our appreciation. ”

Former physician for John Muir Well being says hospitals put cash forward of affected person security, cites baby’s loss of life

A former John Muir Health doctor alleges in a lawsuit that the nonprofit group, which operates hospitals in Walnut Creek and Concord, put money ahead of patient safety and ignored her warnings about surgical hazards that have resulted in illness and death.

Hospital officials dismissed the claims made by Dr. Alicia Kalamas in a lawsuit filed Wednesday in Contra Costa County Superior Court.

Kalamas, who worked at John Muir Health for eight years, said she has repeatedly raised red flags at executives about improper surgical practices, only to be ignored because she was viewed as a woman with “sharp elbows” or because officials feared that Changes that would signal past practices were dangerous.

In one example, she said she warned officials not to authorize complicated surgery on a child and told them other regional hospitals were better prepared to perform the surgery. But because the hospital group’s executives wanted to build a children’s brand, they ignored her concerns, she claims in the lawsuit. Surgeons from John Muir Health performed the surgery and the child died.

In their response to that claim, John Muir Health officials said Kalamas was not directly involved in the case and could not assess the “significant risks” of continuing or not having the surgery.

Kalamas, 50, of Piedmont, sued the nonprofit and its two top executives, Cal Knight, CEO of John Muir Health, and Taejoon Ahn, president and CEO of John Muir Medical Group, alleging the group violated its contract and forced her out of her position after labeling her a troublemaker.

“People at the top of the organization have lost their way,” Kalamas told The Chronicle. “They care more about the bottom line than patient safety.”

John Muir Medical Center on Wednesday, January 12, 2022 in Walnut Creek, California.

Santiago Mejia / The Chronicle

dr Russell Rodriguez, chief medical officer at John Muir Health, said that any feedback from employees is appreciated and that before executives decided not to renew Kalamas’ contract, they decided to restructure the program she administered to include “the better meet today’s patient needs”.

“The fact that the clinical consensus can differ from an individual physician’s views does not mean that he or she has been ignored,” Rodriguez said in a statement to The Chronicle. “Despite efforts to offer coaching and other support, Dr. Kalama’s reality and something she found difficult to understand and accept.”

He said that senior executives make patient safety their number one priority, noting that all the money John Muir Health makes is reinvested in the healthcare system.

Kalamas specializes in anesthesiology with a focus on perioperative medicine, which ensures that the many factors that influence surgical success – before, during and after an operation – are properly managed. In 2013, Kalamas was recruited from UCSF to join John Muir Health as medical director of the perioperative medicine program.

She quickly sought to fix the hospitals’ readmission rate for the highest-volume surgeries, which the lawsuit said was higher than the region’s 6.9% rate.

Her research found a simple problem, she says. When prescribing opiates as pain relievers after surgery, particularly for knee and hip replacements, there was no protocol to educate and provide medication to prevent constipation, resulting in patients returning to the hospital for a variety of issues.

“Millions of dollars were paid to JMH for failing to provide their patients with a 50-cent over-the-counter stool softener, a glass of water, and some basic advice,” Kalamas alleges in her lawsuit.

After her changes were implemented, the hospital saw a 27% decrease in readmissions for joint replacements, reducing costs for medical providers and taxpayers, she says.

Kalamas dealt with postoperative wound infections. Patients who have developed such infections are 60% more likely to be admitted to the ICU and five times more likely to be readmitted research. Yearly such problems costs the US health care system $3.5 to $10 billion.

In the past, John Muir Health has earned revenue from such complications and billed patients for the additional treatment, the lawsuit says. However, the federal government began to force the hospital to pay millions of dollars Punish, says Kalamas, eventually forcing it to improve. Still, Kalamas says executives and others ignored numerous emails she sent warning them that the lack of pre- and post-surgery blood glucose monitors was harming and killing patients.

The lawsuit cites an example of a diabetic who required a second operation after an infection. His heart wasn’t strong enough and he suffered a massive heart attack at home in front of his wife on the first day and later died, according to the lawsuit. Another young patient with kidney failure and diabetes did not have her blood sugar controlled and died shortly after receiving anesthesia; Her blood sugar was high when she coded, Kalamas says.

Rodriguez, John Muir’s chief medical officer, said eliminating postoperative wound infection is a “critical focus” and that restructuring the perioperative program will further reduce infections.

“Peroperative services needed to be made available to a larger proportion of the operated population, and care needed to be extended beyond the clinical setting,” he said.

Kalamas said her whistleblowing and criticism as a woman was bothersome or, as one manager told her, developed a reputation for “sharp elbows”.

“I’ve been in other institutions … and I’ve never felt dismissed,” Kalamas told The Chronicle. “I felt like at John Muir Health I was warning of very serious health and safety concerns and no one was paying attention.”

When she found out about the young child’s planned surgery, it fell outside of her area of ​​responsibility at the hospital, but she felt compelled to speak out, she says. Due to medical privacy laws, neither Kalamas nor her attorney, Dan Horowitz, could provide details about the child and the procedure.

“The case should have been referred to a qualified medical center, which Dr. Kalamas strongly encouraged her,” the lawsuit reads. “In particular, Dr. Kalamas told medical leadership that she had extensive experience with similar cases at UCSF and that JMH was massively underprepared.”

She said she told John Muir Health executives if they did the surgery it would be a “clean kill.”

After the child died, Kalamas requested a review of the case by the Medical Executive Committee, which could result in disciplinary action for those involved, disclosure to parents, and other safeguards. In a 2021 email shared with The Chronicle, Kalamas was informed that the case never went to the committee.

She recalled her earlier concerns about the surgery in an email, explaining how liver transplant and anesthesia experts agreed with her reservations.

“I was angry that JMH misrepresented the capabilities of their clinicians and the institutions’ ability to provide parents (redacted) with safe care given that UCSF, Stanford and Oakland Childrens’ are all much better equipped to to handle cases of this complexity,” she wrote. She added that she was told that John Muir health officials wanted their new pediatric center and needed to avoid disruption.

Horowitz said the child’s parents are still unaware of Kalamas’ concerns to this day.

In response to the pediatric death, Rodriguez said some cases had “extremely advanced life-threatening conditions for which any intervention is a high risk and not having an intervention is also a high risk.” He said all options were discussed with the family before the operation and since Kalamas is not part of the treatment team she would not know all the details.

He said a post-case review was conducted through the peer review process, but Kalamas would not be aware of any assessment as it is confidential.

As of May 31, 2021, Kalamas said her contract was allowed to expire. Since then she has not returned to a hospital.

Matthias Gafni is a contributor to the San Francisco Chronicle. E-mail: matthias.gafni@sfchronicle.com Twitter: @mgafni

New Jersey calls public well being emergency amid omicron hospital surge

New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy speaks to volunteers as he meets with Newark Mayor Ras Baraka during the gubernatorial election in Newark, New Jersey November 2, 2021.

Eduardo Munoz | Reuters

Phil Murphy, Governor of New Jersey reinstated a public health emergency Tuesday as hospitals struggle to keep up with an influx of patients as Covid cases surge amid a persistent shortage of medical staff.

The recent spike is being fueled by the rise of the rapidly spreading Omicron variant, which the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has in its possession These account for about 95% of the sequenced Covid-19 cases in the US Although vaccines, and especially booster doses, provide statistical protection against serious illness and death, experts say the sheer volume of cases is overwhelming hospitals.

Murphy said the state is seeing nearly 35,000 new Covid cases a day and more than 10,000 residents have been hospitalized in the past two weeks.

The re-declaration allows the governor to exercise certain emergency powers, including mask mandates in schools.

Murphy said the renewed state of emergency will have “no new impact at all” on local residents’ daily lives.

“That’s what it doesn’t mean,” he said. “It doesn’t mean new universal mandates or passports. It means no bans. It means no business restrictions or collection limits.”

Half of the hospital beds at Newark University Hospital are filled with patients who have been diagnosed with Covid-19, some of whom were admitted for something else but subsequently tested positive, said hospital president Dr. Shereef Elnahal in an interview on CNBC’s “Squawk box” On Wednesday.

But Elnahal said the Covid infection itself is not his main concern.

“Actually, I’m more worried about a health issue than a Covid-19 issue,” Elnahal told CNBC Becky Swift. “Right now we see our workforce demoralized. There is no light at the end of the tunnel to paint now like I did in Spring 2020.”

He said the industry is losing talented clinicians between the ages of 45 and 60, “often the most energetic and knowledgeable people in the hospital.” That’s a problem that may actually outlast omicron, “which appears to have already plateaued, at least in cases in the New York metro area.”

Elnahal said nearly 10% of his hospital’s staff are traveling with Covid, bringing the hospital closer to a staff crisis with “awkward” staff-to-patient ratios.

Elnahal said he would like the government to come up with a “clear definition” of the endgame in relation to Covid-19.

“Which case level defines the endemic case?” What does this mean for healthcare regulations and what can we do, what should we avoid? How much capacity should we create? What is the guidance for healthcare organizations that will be dealing with this pandemic but also with the aftermath?” are some of the questions he wants answered.

Subscribe to CNBC on YouTube.

WATCH: University Hospital CEO on Covid staff crisis: Our workforce is demoralized

Vegan Kitchen: Lower your expenses, save your well being, save the world, eat vegan!

With food prices rising rapidly, more than ever want to find ways to save money on our grocery bills. I’ve always believed that eating plant-based foods is an important way to control costs, and a recent study from the UK confirms that calculating that vegan meals can cut food bills by up to a third.

the Pricing model studyconducted by researchers from Oxford University and published in The Lancet Planetary Health, examined food costs in 150 countries. Based on 2017 prices released by the World Bank’s International Comparative Program, the study found that replacing plant-based foods with animal-based foods could lower food bills in rich countries, including the United States.

In particular, the study found that vegan diets are the most economical and can cut food bills by up to 34 percent compared to the food costs of a typical Western diet. In terms of budget-friendliness, the vegan diet was followed by the vegetarian diet, with the potential to cut food costs by 31 percent; flexitarian diets that could cut costs by 14 percent; and veggie-heavy Pescatarian diets that could actually add 2 percent to the cost.

The study looked at two types of vegan diets – one with more grains and one with more vegetables – and found that while both saved money, the grain-based vegan diet was the cheapest of all the diets analyzed. According to the study’s authors, fruits and vegetables cost more than grains and legumes worldwide. None of the diets modeled by the researchers contained ultra-processed foods.

“We believe that the fact that vegan, vegetarian and flexitarian diets can save you big bucks will surprise people,” said author Marco Springmann, a senior researcher on population health at Oxford Martin School, in a university report on the learning . “When scientists like me advocate healthy and environmentally friendly nutrition, it is often said that we are sitting in our ivory towers promoting something that most people cannot financially achieve. This study shows that the opposite is true. These diets could be better for your bank balance as well as your health and … the planet. “

The idea that vegan food is more expensive has been regularly criticized for a plant-based diet for years.

Before conducting the price comparison study, researchers at Oxford University noted a growing scientific understanding of the health and climate costs of animal foods. However, they found less research (and what there was was contradicting) on ​​the cost to consumers of animal vs. plant-based foods.

The Oxford study went beyond bills at the supermarket checkout. The study found that taking into account a range of nutritional costs that are not currently included in food prices, the price of plant-based foods would drop even further. These external costs included diet-related health expenditure and greenhouse gas emissions caused by the cultivation and transportation of food.

According to the study, including climate costs in food prices would increase the cost savings potential of a vegan diet to 45 percent compared to a conventional diet, while if health costs were included, a vegan diet plan would reduce food costs by 47 percent. If both types of costs were taken into account, a vegan diet would save 53 percent of food bills, according to the researchers.

“There are many other effects of the food system that are not currently reflected in food prices, including effects on biodiversity and air and water pollution,” the study authors noted.

One significant health expense that could decrease as more people in the US eat vegan is the cost of treating moderate to severe COVID-19 infections. During 2021, a trickle of medical research began to uncover a link between a plant-heavy diet and milder COVID infections.

In June, a to learn published in BMJ Nutrition, Prevention & Health Journal, found that among 2,884 frontline healthcare workers in six countries including the United States, those who followed a plant-based diet had a 73 percent lower risk of moderate to severe COVID than employees in health care had to eat more animal foods.

In September, the medical journal Gut a to learn from Massachusetts General Hospital, which analyzed data from 592,571 participants in a smartphone-based study of COVID symptoms and found that those who ate the most plant-based foods had a 9 percent lower risk of developing COVID, and develop a 41 percent lower risk of severe COVID. Study participants came from the USA and Great Britain

For decades, there has been a surge in medical studies showing that plant-based diets protect against many of the leading causes of death in the U.S. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2020 (the last year for which statistics are available) is the front runner two Causes of death Heart disease remained followed by cancer, both related to the high consumption of animal foods. The number of deaths from heart disease saw the largest increase since 2012, increasing 4.2 percent in 2020. COVID was the third leading cause of death in 2020.

The deaths from diabetes and Alzheimer’s, two diseases associated with an animal diet, rose 15.4 percent and 9.8 percent, respectively, in 2020. Of the eleven leading causes of death in the US in 2020, only two (accidental injury and suicide) have no known association with dieting. The potential association between developing severe influenza and pneumonia (the ninth leading cause of death) has not been well studied. All others – stroke, chronic lower respiratory diseases, and kidney disease – correlate with animal-based consumption, and all showed improvement or reversal in patients who switched to plant-based meals.

But health care costs aren’t the only burden that current food prices don’t account for. The US meat subsidies also distort prices at the supermarket checkout and around the world.

after a Paper published Last year, the U.S. spent nearly $ 38 billion annually on agricultural subsidies in the Columbia Journal of International Affairs, less than one percent of which went to vegetable and fruit growers. Instead, the lion’s share of government support goes to ranchers and farmers who grow crops that are used to feed cattle or produce highly processed foods. The same paper noted that these US subsidies not only distort food prices in the US, but also depress international market prices for crops, causing many farmers in poor countries to give up farming and forcing their governments to import food, which could be grown locally if the economy was different.

This brings us back to the study by the University of Oxford, which also examined food prices in poor countries. While vegan food in affluent countries can save money for consumers according to the researchers, it is different in developing countries. The current diet there is often nutritionally inadequate. Because the researchers assessed the cost of following a nutritionally appropriate vegan, vegetarian, flexitarian, pescatarian, and western standard diet, residents of poor countries would have to pay more to meet this standard regardless of what type of diet they followed.

After all, while the Oxford University study brings high-quality, much-needed data into the political debates about food costs, vegan and vegetarian shoppers have known about these savings for generations. For the past few months, I’ve spent time in the Portland Room of the Portland Public Library, where, with the help of archivist Abraham Alain Schechter, I’ve found historical evidence of the affordability of vegetarian foods.

For example, half a century ago the Maine Sunday Telegram ran a story entitled “How to Cut Your Grocery Bill 25%”. The article published on August 20, 1972 reports on the frugality of vegetarian food. Reporter Lloyd Ferris compared the price his family of four paid for groceries, an average of $ 25 a week, to that of meat-eaters in a University of Maine history class he was taking; they were spending an average of $ 35 to $ 50 a week.

“After a year of vegetarian life,” wrote Ferris, “I sometimes believe – perhaps a little complacent – that my carnivorous friends are suffering unnecessarily.”

I don’t feel complacent at all. I am sad to find that this unnecessary suffering drags on for much more than 50 years.

Go back even further, for example 169 years to October 6, 1853, when Jeremiah Hacker‘s alternative newspaper, the Portland Pleasure Boat, printed an article from the American Vegetarian Society. “As much food for the body can be obtained for three cents from floury or plant-based foods as can be obtained from animal food for thirty cents,” the article says.

Recent research from Oxford University adds scientific confirmation to anecdotal information known for more than a century. Eating vegan and vegetarian options has long been the thrifty choice in Maine.

Avery Yale Kamila is a food writer who lives in Portland. She can be reached at [email protected] Twitter: @AveryYaleKamila

Invalid username / password.

Please check your email to confirm and complete your registration.

Use the form below to reset your password. When you’ve sent your account email, we’ll send an email with a reset code.

similar posts

CVS Well being is an efficient long-term purchase

WSFS Finance: “I like that. It’s a good bank in a good area. Let’s try to get it. I’ve admired it for about 30 years.”

CVS health: “I will say yes [for a long-term investment], supported by the fabulous Lisa Gill [of JPMorgan] who told me to buy it for $ 15 and says I don’t mind that it is at $ 100. Buy it again. ”

Roblox: “Roblox is the kind of stock I want to plow through this time because it’s such an original, great way to play the Metaverse.”

Paymentus stocks: “I know it’s payment technology. These stocks are under so much pressure, but they make money. Let me dig deeper and get back to you.”

Join Now for the CNBC Investing Club to follow Jim Cramer’s every move in the market.

Grant cash will broaden well being entry in Indianapolis’ Burmese neighborhood – WISH-TV | Indianapolis Information | Indiana Climate

INDIANAPOLIS (WISH) – New grant funds will help improve the health outcomes of the growing Burmese population in Indianapolis.

Franciscan Health says it has worked with the community for more than 10 years. The new funding will enable better individual support.

Around 25,000 Burmese refugees live in the Indianapolis area. According to Franciscan Health, Burmese have some of the highest poverty rates and lowest rates in English proficiency at the national level, and both are often incorporated into medical access. Removing these barriers, the organizers hope, will result in longer and healthier lives.

Burmese refugees made their way to Indianapolis in large numbers about 10 years ago. Many chose to live on the south side of Indianapolis. But coming from Burma, health care was often not a priority or easily accessible.

“Back in Burma there was no health care. In general, medical care was not available. So there is no annual or just general screening, ”said Burmese health advocate Nancy Sui.

Sui is from Burma. She said that access to health care can be difficult for everyone, but especially the elderly.

“Of course there is definitely a language barrier in the community because many older generations don’t speak.”

At the start of the new year, Franciscan Health received nearly $ 185,000 to improve health care. The money will provide culturally appropriate personal support by helping patients gain access to health and human services. Support will also come from Burmese health workers and other agencies, including the Burmese American Community Institute and the Indiana Chin Community.

“Like many Catholic hospitals, Franciscan Health is truly committed to the health of the most vulnerable in all of our communities,” said Kate Hill-Johnson, administrative director for community health improvement at Franciscan Health.

Representatives said the hospital has served the Burmese community since the arrival of the largest groups of refugees about 10 years ago, and needs have changed over time.

“Now let’s look at these traditional chronic diseases that occur in old age,” said Hill-Johnson.

With the list of asylum seekers, the Burmese population should continue to grow. Lawyers said the time has come to strengthen health systems.

Mental health, like some other communities, remains a taboo subject. In addition to the grants, Burmese advocates will increase mental health support.

Group Golf Remedy artwork sequence raises cash for psychological well being

Group golf therapy is a team of developers dedicated to uncovering the link between golf and mental health.

The founders of GGT are former college golfers, Bradford Wilson, Connor Laubenstein and Drew Westphal. Each of them are on individual journeys to redefine their relationship with the game and have deeper golf conversations.

Group Golf Therapy has partnered with three artists to raise funds for various mental health organizations. You named this art series Mind Your Golf. Every piece is abstract, playful and all wins come from that National Queer & Trans Therapists of Color Network, that Boris Lawrence Henson Foundation, and Courage Milwaukee. Each piece is priced at $ 36.

GGT Mind Your Golf by Tony Knapton. (Tony Knapton)

GGT Mind Your Golf by Luke Schaffner. (Lukas Schaffner)

the Group golf therapy podcast is available on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, and Podbean. You will have great discussions with current and former professional golfers, golf industry professionals, golf enthusiasts and mental health experts.

Occasionally we recommend interesting products, services and play opportunities. When you make a purchase by clicking on any of the links we can earn an affiliate fee. However, Golfweek operates independently and this does not affect our reporting.

New 12 months meal Black-eyed peas, collards, pork;Luck, cash, well being

KENTUCKY, USA – New Years Day in the South is all about what you eat, what they say is set up for a successful year. Your New Year’s Day meal should include kale, black-eyed peas, pork, and cornbread. They are said to bring health, wealth and happiness.

It’s not entirely clear when or why these foods became the New Year’s staples, but according to Southern Food by southern food researcher John Egerton: At home, on the go, in history black-eyed peas have been associated with a “mystical and mythical.” Power to bring luck. ”

The legume comes from West Africa and is often included in meals on special occasions. Many believe that the swelling of the cooked bean symbolizes the increase in happiness.

Here are the New Years classics and what they’re supposed to represent: