Being profitable in boxing means not saying you are sorry

Making money boxing means never having to apologize.

Not for Evander Holyfield risking his life at the age of 58 just to make a few dollars. Especially not to steal money from gullible fans for a farce of a pay-per-view show that would have done terrible damage to the sport, if only it hadn’t been so badly damaged.

Nobody apologized – at least loud enough to hear – among the crew of the Triller Fight Club, a young promotional outfit on the verge of boxing. They managed to get Holyfield in Florida licensed and moved the entire map over there from California at short notice after scheduled headliner Oscar De La Hoya withdrew with what he referred to as COVID-19.

Holyfield also made no apologies after being credited with landing just one punch before being stopped in the first round by a former MMA fighter. The Real Deal now apparently lives on the edge of reality as he suggested after the fight he wanted another fight – this one against Mike Tyson.

Somewhere else in boxing, however, there was an apology. A rare and heartfelt apology from a judge who said he screwed up.

The best thing about it? It came out of nowhere, like a perfect left hook.

Stephen Blea was one of three judges on Friday night in Tucson when home hero Oscar Valdez faced Robson Conceicao in a junior lightweight title bout. It was a familiar position for Blea, who valued having directed more than 60 title fights as a referee in wrestling around the world.

That night, the sold-out crowd cheered Valdez – loudly. In his ring seat, Blea dealt with photographers on one side and a camera team in constant motion on the other.

“I honestly thought I could do my job 100% with no excuses,” he said.

But the noise of the crowd affected Blea early on. He scored some rounds for Valdez that could even be scored or for Conceicao.

The story goes on

In the end, Blea got the winner right. But his lead of 117-110 stood out in an extremely close match (the other two judges had 115-112 Valdez).

The predictable online outrage over his score made Blea think he might be wrong. He watched a replay of the bout and concluded that he should have scored 115-112 or 114-113.

So he apologized not only stunningly, but also unprecedented.

All of the terrible decisions made over the years. All the controversy over a terrible score.

Nobody ever apologized for them.

But a judge in Arizona did.

“The 117-110 score is not accurate and does not represent the action in the ring and I feel like I have let my association, the NABF, down; my organization, the WBC; and above all our sport and the fighters in the ring, ”wrote Blea.

Hopefully people will be careful with Triller because they will have to apologize too. Throwing a man in the ring at the last minute who had just moved in just four years after paying social security was not just a mockery of a sport that needs no further ridicule.

It was also about the callousness of risking a man’s life – or rummaging through his brain – just to clear the income statement.

Triller is hardly alone. Boxing has a long history of promoters and managers who sacrificed fighters for the sake of their wallets. They have ruined careers and ruined lives in a sport so dangerous that every stroke can be the last.

It was hard to see the clips of Holyfield for the short time he was in the ring. The fighter who beat up Tyson a quarter of a century ago and then fouled him at the second meeting looked slow and confused as he tried desperately to find some of the old magic.

Even sadder, Holyfield – who made $ 35 million for the 1997 Tyson second fight – was so desperate for money that he was delusional enough to even step into the ring.

Compare that to Blea, who was so upset with his assessment that he plans to take time out and undergo a thorough retraining program before returning to the ring.

“I am an honorable man with deep love, knowledge and respect for the sport,” he said. “I’m sorry I had a bad night and brought unnecessary controversy into such a sensational fight.”

Real excuse. In boxing, of all things.

Imagine.

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Tim Dahlberg is a national sports columnist for The Associated Press. Write to him at tdahlberg@ap.org or https://twitter.com/timdahlberg

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More AP sports: https://apnews.com/hub/apf-sports and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports

No sweat if you’re in type – The Lion’s Roar

Fashion is constantly evolving, and with summer just around the corner, now is the time to decide what works and what doesn’t.

Students shared their advice on summer fashion trends and how to stay stylish and stay cool in the summer sun.

Shelby Durel, a freshman student, explained what are some popular fashion trends right now.

“The most popular fashion trends right now are flowing dresses for a more cottage-core style, and shorts seem to be returning to the middle of the climb. Crop tops and bodysuits are still in, but it’s more of a softer look, ”she said.

Madison Wise, a psychology student at Freshman, believes skirts are more popular right now.

She said, “I think halter neck tops, tennis skirts, maxi skirts, and backless tops or mesh tops are all in fashion now. I’ve always had a soft spot for skirts and definitely halter tops. I already own so many so it would be stupid not to. I will probably wear mesh to the music festivals. ”

Freshman political science and history Fajr Fayed discussed the popularity of secondhand clothing this season.

“I think there are a lot of thrifty styles out there that are pretty cool. Different aesthetics, such as the cottage core, have also had an impact. You will see styles that contain different elements. Overall, I think the pandemic has inspired people to be more creative with their outfits, ”she said.

Wise said low pants should stay in the spring, and Logan Zimmerman, a freshman, agrees, adding that scarves shouldn’t flow into the summer.

“Scarves aren’t exactly a summer thing, but you can get away with them in spring,” he said.

During the summer, Wise plans to travel outside of the state to music festivals and beaches. She discussed the types of clothing she will wear on these occasions.

Wise said, “I’m going to Rolling Loud a couple of times and probably Texas. For Rolling Loud I honestly have no idea, but I’ll probably be wearing bra / mesh tops and shorts. In Texas, I’ll probably wear the big pants, a little top combo. “

Zimmerman will also be traveling to Texas this summer to attend a Pride event and share his fashion agenda.

Freshman Art Major Shelby Durel looks out over the baseball field. She watches the sun go down while wondering what her next outfit will be this summer. She said she hoped to be able to wear more clothes given the warm weather. (Hannah Juneau / The Lion’s Roar)

“I’m going to be going to Texas with my boyfriend for a Pride thing, and I’ll probably be wearing something simple as it gets hot. I will definitely bring sunglasses so I don’t go blind, ”he said.

Pride fashion varies from year to year. One particular clothing brand has influenced the LGBTQ + community: ASOS.

According to themanual.com, for the fourth year in a row, ASOS has partnered with GLAAD, an LGBTQ + media source, to create a Pride apparel collection. ASOS will donate all proceeds to support GLAAD and the LGBTQ + community.

Looking into the summer, Durel plans to follow some trends, but not all.

“It’s more of a neutral summer that is about high fashion, so I think that’s the case in some areas. Not all of them, though, because it doesn’t suit my body type, ”she shared.

Like Durel, Fayed enjoys the creativity and style of loose clothing, but she may not follow all trends either. Because of Fayed’s Islamic beliefs, there are certain requirements that she must follow.

She said, “The headscarf is called a hijab, and when you wear the hijab, you wear loose, modest clothing that covers your entire body. Flowing cotton dresses are great for summer when you wear the hijab as cotton is a breathable material that is lightweight and will keep you cool in the heat. They are one of the styles I love for summer. Skirts are also a great option, but finding a long sleeve shirt to match can be a challenge at times. ”

Watch out for rip-off asking you for cash to show you’re proprietor of your house

by: Linda wagar,

Posted: Apr 24, 2021 7:00 AM HST
Updated: April 23, 2021 / 1:39 p.m. HST

INDEPENDENCE, Mon – You may have seen it in the mail. An official looking letter asking for money to confirm that you are the actual owner of your home. Do not follow the instructions on the letter. It’s a scam.

When Mabel Shapiro saw the letter in her mailbox, she thought at first that it was from the state. It had a return address from Jefferson City, Missouri, and the envelope officially appeared.

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It was a letter from Records Recovery Services asking her to send $ 87 for a copy of her deed to confirm that she actually owned her home. Shapiro was immediately suspicious.

“I thought they were going to steal my house if I didn’t pay what they wanted,” she said.

Instead of sending the money, Shaprio went to the Jackson County Recorder of Deed office in Missouri and showed them the letter.

Arkansas: Scammers seek out personal information with one-click text message bait

“They looked at it and said, ‘Oh yeah, this is a scam. Call the FBI, ”she said.

Shapiro called the FBI and FOX4 problem solvers.

Letters identical to those she received have been sent to homeowners across the country. A quick Google search showed warnings from county officials in several states telling people not to send money to Records Recovery Services.

The company, which allegedly has an office in Jefferson City, Missouri, was not registered with the Missouri Secretary of State. In addition, offices in other states, almost always in the state capitals, often go back to a PO Box.

The letter Shapiro received contained several disclaimers indicating that it is not a government agency. However, if you don’t read the letter carefully, you may miss it.

FOX4 problem solvers attempted to call the phone number provided for Records Recovery Services during normal business hours and intercepted a general message asking us to leave our name and phone number. The message didn’t even mention the company’s name.

Here’s the deal, no one has to spend $ 87 on a copy of a deed. All you have to do is contact your district government and request one.

At the Recorder of Deed’s Jackson County office, a certificate costs anywhere from $ 2 to $ 3, depending on the number of pages.

What Ought to You Do With Cash You are Saving for a Down Fee?

You cannot afford to make the wrong choices by these important resources.

When you buy a home, most Mortgage lender You need to pay at least one deposit. And ideally, you will be reducing the value of your home by 20% to avoid private mortgage insurance and qualify for a loan at the best interest rate.

Since a house is an expensive purchase, a small one too deposit can add up to tens of thousands of dollars. It will likely take time to save enough money to cover it. And when you save it, you have to decide where to put the money. This decision is important because you want to avoid making the wrong choice and putting your ability to buy a home at risk.

Where should you put your down payment savings?

While you have several options for how to handle your down payment, in almost all situations, putting the money in a high-yield savings account is your best bet.

ON High yield savings account offers the perfect solution, as your money is in a separate account reserved for your deposit. That means you are less likely to rob the funds. You deserve a better price than one checking account or most traditional savings accounts and you can take the money out when you need it.

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There are a few main reasons this is your best option.

First and foremost, within months or years, you will likely capitalize on the down payment savings to buy a home. No matter how long you hold onto the money, you cannot afford to invest in the stock market for such a short period of time because you may buy at the wrong time and experience a market crash that will deplete the value of your funds.

While restores are inevitably the result of crashes, it can take some time and you may not want to postpone your home purchase while waiting to get back the money lost in the market. By tying up your money in investments, you are taking the chance in not being able to access it when you are ready become a homebuyer. Why should you jeopardize your home ownership dreams?

Other investments where you need to freeze your money for a certain period of time, e.g. B. Bonds or Certificates of depositmay also not be the best choice as you may need your money on a shorter timeline. When the perfect opportunity for a home arises, you don’t want to be prevented from giving it away while you wait for your loan to mature or imposing an early withdrawal penalty.

You also don’t want your deposit in your regular checking account to be mixed up with your other funds. Doing this increases the chances of spending it on other immediate priorities rather than leaving it alone until you find the perfect home. It may take you longer to become a homeowner when you spend your down payment because it is too accessible to you.

Take the time to research savings account options to find the one for you, and put your money back on a regular basis so you can build the down payment you need to buy the home of your dreams.

Millennial Cash: three issues to know when you’re new to gig work

Shutdowns, layoffs, and pay cuts caused by the coronavirus pandemic have left millions of Americans looking for new sources of income. Those who have recently turned to gig work may be weeks away from financial surprise in the form of unexpected tax bills and insurance coverage fine print.

“These are the top two things most new business owners overlook,” says Chris Russell, a San Diego-based certified financial planner who specializes in business owners and the self-employed.

Don’t you consider yourself a small business owner? Well, let’s start there.

For the IRS, you’re a small business

Sure, you only do grocery deliveries. But that simple act makes you a small business in the eyes of the IRS. And that opinion is the only one that matters when it comes to taxes.

“Basically, you are considered an independent contractor,” said Garrett Watson, a senior policy analyst at the Tax Foundation, a nonprofit. “You don’t have to do anything super complicated. You don’t have to integrate or do something like that.”

But you have to pay taxes on any money you make gig work. This fact is often an undesirable and expensive surprise to new gig workers. As an employee, income and wage taxes are automatically withheld from your paycheck. That’s not the case with gig workers, says Russell.

“There is no tax deducted on the money you make as a business owner,” Russell says. “That means you will likely owe the IRS a lot of money for filing your returns.”

A good rule of thumb: for every dollar you make gig work, save 30% for income and income Taxes on self-employment. In the future, plan to estimate and pay these taxes quarterly to avoid penalties from the IRS.

And if you think, “I haven’t made a lot. I won’t report it. How does the IRS know?” Do not do it. It will know.

EXPENSE TRACKING IS YOUR BEST FRIEND

Gig work isn’t all money in the bank. They also generate costs. Keep these in mind as you can probably subtract some of them and cut the tax burden we talked about a second ago.

“Keep good and honest records to get any allowances due to you,” said Ryan Greiser, a certified financial planner based in Doylestown, Pennsylvania.

Apps like Stride, Hurdlr and MileIQ automatically track your mileage and expenses for free or for a small fee to help you calculate taxes. Depending on your situation, Greiser says it might be worth exploring QuickBooks.

“It’s a small investment tracking expenses, estimating your quarterly taxes, keeping track of your mileage, and paying your quarterly taxes online,” says Greiser.

You’ll also want to explore the nuances that may and may not be deducted depending on your gig work, says Watson, pointing to Ride Hail Services as an example.

For example, let’s say you drop a passenger off and drive around town to find your next ride, he says. Can you deduct the cost of gasoline used between trips? (You can the IRS Gig Economy Control Center is a good place to find answers to your questions.

INSURANCE CAN BECOME COMPLICATED

The IRS isn’t the only agency that needs to know about your new sources of income. Your insurance agent must also be informed. Failure to disclose your work can in some cases exclude you from your policy. Additionally, your insurance agent can help you understand what aspects of your gig work are covered.

Transporting food or people? You need to know if your personal car insurance covers incidents while you’re on the job (probably not.) Carpooling or commercial auto insurance could fill the gaps.

While the platform you are working on may have a business policy covering you, it will only be activated in certain circumstances. It is important to know the details of this coverage.

Uber and Lyft offer commercial coverage for drivers, but this only applies if you have passengers in the car or are on your way to pick up a passenger after taking a ride. DoorDash only offers liability insurance and only if there is groceries in your car. Grubhub and Instacart do not provide commercial coverage for delivery drivers on their platforms.

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This column was provided to The Associated Press by the personal finance website NerdWallet. Kelsey Sheehy is a writer at NerdWallet.

RELATED LINKS:

NerdWallet: Self Employment Tax – Understand & Calculate It in 2020, https://bit.ly/nerdwallet-self-employment

IRS Gig Economy Tax Center: https://www.irs.gov/businesses/gig-economy-tax-center

Millennial Cash: three issues to know in case you’re new to gig work

Don’t you consider yourself a small business owner? Well, let’s start there.

For the IRS, you’re a small business

Sure, you only do grocery deliveries. But that simple act makes you a small business in the eyes of the IRS. And that opinion is the only one that matters when it comes to taxes.

“Basically, you are considered an independent contractor,” said Garrett Watson, a senior policy analyst at the Tax Foundation, a nonprofit. “You don’t have to do anything very complicated. You don’t have to incorporate or do anything like that. “

But you have to pay taxes on any money you make gig work. This fact is often an undesirable and expensive surprise to new gig workers. As an employee, income and wage taxes are automatically withheld from your paycheck. That’s not the case with gig workers, says Russell.

“There is no tax deducted on the money you make as a business owner,” Russell says. “That means you will likely owe a lot of money to the IRS if you file your returns.”

A good rule of thumb: for every dollar you make gig work, save 30% on income and self-employment taxes. In the future, plan to estimate and pay these taxes quarterly to avoid penalties from the IRS.

And if you think, “I haven’t earned much. I will not report it. How will the IRS know? “Don’t do it. It will know.

EXPENSE TRACKING IS YOUR BEST FRIEND

Gig work isn’t all money in the bank. They also generate costs. Keep these in mind as you can probably subtract some of them and cut the tax burden we talked about a second ago.

“Keep good and honest records to get any deductions due to you,” said Ryan Greiser, a certified financial planner based in Doylestown, Pennsylvania.

Apps like Stride, Hurdlr and MileIQ automatically track your mileage and expenses for free or for a small fee to help you calculate taxes. Depending on your situation, Greiser says it might be worth exploring QuickBooks.

“It’s a small investment to keep track of expenses, estimate your quarterly taxes, track your mileage, and pay your quarterly taxes online,” says Greiser.

You’ll also want to explore the nuances that may and may not be deducted depending on your gig work, says Watson, citing Ride-Hail Services as an example.

For example, let’s say you drop a passenger off and drive around town to find your next ride, he says. Can you deduct the cost of gasoline used between trips? (You can.) The IRS Gig Economy Tax Center is a good place to find answers to your questions.

INSURANCE CAN BECOME COMPLICATED

The IRS isn’t the only agency that needs to know about your new sources of income. Your insurance agent must also be informed. Failure to disclose your work can in some cases exclude you from your policy. Additionally, your insurance agent can help you understand what aspects of your gig work are covered.

Transporting food or people? You need to know if your personal car insurance covers incidents while you’re on the job (probably not.) Carpooling or commercial auto insurance could fill the gaps.

While the platform you are working on may have a business policy covering you, it will only be activated in certain circumstances. It is important to know the details of this coverage.

Uber and Lyft offer commercial coverage for drivers, but this only applies if you have passengers in the car or are on your way to pick up a passenger after taking a ride. DoorDash only offers liability insurance and only if there is groceries in your car. Grubhub and Instacart do not provide commercial coverage for delivery drivers on their platforms.

___________________________________

This column was provided to The Associated Press by the personal finance website NerdWallet. Kelsey Sheehy is a writer at NerdWallet. Email: ksheehy@nerdwallet.com. Twitter: @kelseylsheehy.

NerdWallet: Self Employment Tax: Understand and Calculate It in 2020 https://bit.ly/nerdwallet-self-employment

IRS Gig Economy Tax Center https://www.irs.gov/businesses/gig-economy-tax-center

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed without permission.