Three younger Mainers increase cash to youngsters go to summer season camp

Elle Foley, Sophia Turker and Emma Bowden founded the group ‘Gratitude for Maine’ and sell postcards and calendars to send children to summer camp

FALMOUTH, Maine – Three young Mainers are on a mission to help make the summer of their lives for the less fortunate in the ward.

“I believe children should have the opportunity to have fun, be with friends and be at summer camp and just experience all the opportunity,” said Elle Foley, a 6th grade student at Falmouth Middle School.

Foley and her two friends Emma Bowden and Sophia Turker formed the organization “Gratitude for Maine.” You may be young, but you set out to make a huge impact.

“You live in such a beautiful place, it should really be used, you should go outside every day and experience the outdoors, the outdoors and the sea,” said Turker, also a sixth grader at Falmouth Middle School.

I am very excited to share the work of these three young Mainers. Elle, Sophia and Emma founded the Gratitude for Maine organization and sell these postcards and calendars to help some Maine children have the summer of their lives. Whole story tonight at 6! @ Newscentermaine pic.twitter.com/jY39C54IyM

– Sean Stackhouse (@StackhouseNCME) April 25, 2021

The young Mainers behind ‘Gratitude for Maine’ want to raise around 10,000 US dollars to send two children to summer camp in Maine. They also sell postcards, calendars and soon also t-shirts. All of the money they raise goes straight to their fund to send children to camp.

“Kids are really going to see Maine what we’re trying to do,” said Foley.

Foley, Turker, and Bowden are close friends and each have their own summer camp experiences.

“Obviously everything was shut down last year and last summer we had to be creative in what we were doing,” said Bowden, an eighth grader at North Yarmouth Academy.

When the pandemic hit and canceled camp for the 2020 season, the three of them focused on their photography for the summer and built an impressive collection of their own photos.

“We had a lot of great pictures of Maine, but nothing to do with those pictures,” Bowden said.

That was until the three of them sparked the idea for “Gratitude for Maine”. They have since taken these photos and placed them on calendars and postcards. So far, they have raised about $ 2000.

“It’s very important to me to give something back,” said Foley. “It’s a very important part of being a kid, I think, and I think more kids should have that experience.”

Foley, Turker, and Bowden look forward to returning to summer camp themselves, but are delighted that they can look forward to their own days in the sun and help give back.

You can purchase postcards and calendars from Gratitude for Maine by visiting theirs Website.

New Covid variant reveals indicators of antibody resistance, extra extreme sickness in younger folks

Radoslav Zilinsky moment | Getty Images

Scientists at Texas A & M University’s Global Health Research Complex have reportedly discovered a new variant of Covid-19 that shows signs of an infectious strain that causes more serious diseases and appears to be resistant to antibodies.

The new variant BV-1, named for its Brazos Valley origin, was found during routine coronavirus screening by Texas A & M via a saliva sample in a young student with mild symptoms of cold. The student tested positive for Covid on March 5 and tested positive again on March 25, showing that the new strain can cause prolonged infection in younger people. The student’s symptoms resolved by April 2nd and a third test on April 9th ​​was negative.

Texas A&M scientists say cell culture-based experiments from other laboratories showed that multiple neutralizing antibodies did not affect the control of other variants with the same genetic markers as BV-1.

“We don’t currently understand the full meaning of this variant, but it has a combination of mutations that are similar to other internationally notifiable variants,” said Ben Neuman, chief virologist at Texas A&M. “This variant combines genetic markers that are separate with faster Spread, serious disease and high resistance to neutralizing antibodies are linked. “

The scientists also say they presented a paper on BV-1 to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to alert officials before it spreads further.

The lab has identified many Covid mutations through its genetic sequencing program, but Neuman said the genetic makeup of this strain is of particular concern.

“We haven’t seen any other cases of this variant,” added Neuman. “We have not grown or tested this virus in any way. This announcement is based solely on genetic sequence analysis performed in the laboratory.”

Many U.S. labs only sequence severe Covid cases, but the Texas A&M lab tests and sequences asymptomatic students to detect dangerous strains early before they can cause serious illness.

“Sequencing helps provide an early warning system for new variants,” said Neuman. The lab’s scientists say they do not yet understand the full meaning of BV-1, but believe the variant “highlights an important need for strict surveillance and genomic testing,” especially in young adults who are asymptomatic or who show mild symptoms .

Scientists at the lab say the new variant is related to strain B.1.1.7 from the UK, against which current vaccines have been shown to be effective. The related British strain makes up a large part of the variant infections in the United States

Younger baker donates faculty lunch cash to fellow Solar Prairie college students

SONNENPRAIRIE (WKOW) – A sixth grader from Sun Prairie discovered the baking bug during the pandemic and is now using her talents to help her fellow students.

Keena Schroeder has a cheesecake shop called “Bug’s Bakery” – Bug is her nickname.

Schröder and her father thought about how they could use the money they brought in.

She takes $ 5 from the sale of each cheesecake and donates it to the school district’s Hunger Hero campaign.

“He raised the Hunger Heroes, which means it’s a campaign to raise money for kids who can’t afford lunch at school. And I thought that sounds really good, especially because it’s like food and I make cheesecake, “he told Schröder.

On Monday evening, Schröder presented the school board with a check for USD 1,000. The young baker will continue to bake cheesecakes as long as people want to buy them.

How a lot cash ought to I spend on Coinbase inventory? Monetary advisers provide steering to younger buyers

It is invested with “play money” and then played with fire.

As a Coinbase, the Cryptocurrency exchange, goes public on Wednesday, financial advisors want you to remember the difference.


As the number of retail investors grows, there is a growing attraction to find and benefit from the next new thing.

Enter Coinbase, a platform with 56 million verified users that enables buying and selling of Crytpocurrencies like Bitcoin
BTCUSD, + 2.21%
and etherthat seem to keep increasing in value.

An obvious investment considering the expert’s assumption that cryptocurrency plays a role “Turning point” Law?

Not necessarily. Do this with caution, say financial advisers.

Experts say it is has always been risky investing in companies the way they go public.

For example, with no track record, stock prices can be speculative Retail investors who believe they understand the brand may not appreciate it as much as institutional investors do.

Mix that with the cryptocurrency now volatilityand consider the skepticism of some who say Coinbase’s valuation is “Ridiculously high.” That number ranges from $ 50 billion to $ 150 billion, and even bullish experts say the stock is “not for the faint of heart.”

(A Coinbase spokeswoman declined to comment ahead of the IPO.)

The idea is to invest in an IPO with a small portion of the money that you may lose. The question is how much? Here are a few different answers.

The numbers game

A common refrain is to use between 5% and 10% of investable wealth for speculative investments or stocks. Others say the amount you are okay with shouldn’t be more than 1% of an investor portfolio, if that’s not an overly plain word.

Ron Guay of Rivermark Wealth Management in Sunnyvale, Calif., Urges clients to limit their “play money” to 10% – and that’s the same rule he follows himself.


“The less your net worth, the smaller the percentage of the game money you should lose.”

– Theresa Morrison, founding partner at Beckett Collective in Tucson, Arizona.

Daniel Johnson from RE | Focus Financial Planning of Winston Salem, NC says it’s all for people who put money into the companies they care about because the investment often affects companies they know and understand.

But he’s also everything for diversification. Keeping your investment in a company below 5% is a good bet, he said.

However, according to Theresa Morrison, founding partner of the Beckett Collective in Tucson, Arizona, not all of them fit the same numbers.

“If you don’t want to lose your ‘play money’ then don’t play,” she said. The money could be 1% to 2% of the assets invested, she said.

“The less your net worth, the smaller the percentage of the game money you should lose,” she said. “Conversely, the more flushes you have, the more percent of the game money you can allocate, but only up to a point.”

The no-numbers approach

Ahead of Coinbase’s direct listing, Chris Struckhoff, founder of Lionheart Capital Management in Orange County, Calif., Said he had spoken to a few customers looking to buy Coinbase stock.

“You have those dollar signs in your eyes,” he said.

These people view Coinbase stocks as rocket fuel to help them meet their financial goals, but “as with anything, the faster you try to go, the more likely you’ll trip yourself,” he said.

Struckhoff does not ask its customers to buy the stock or to wait. He’s contemplating the idea of ​​playing money without using fixed numbers. He does this by thinking backwards with customers.

You start out by remembering a person’s financial goals – a house, a boat, a nest egg, or something else. Then they look at the financial leeway that someone has to devote to something like a Coinbase piece.

What about buying cryptocurrency?

Given the surge in cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin and Ethereum
ETHUSD, + 3.61%,
Some say it’s worth going straight to the source and buying virtual currency instead. But again they say not to go overboard.


“You can either look for gold (your own crypto) or sell shovels (your own Coinbase share).”

– Graciano Rubio, of Infinity Financial Planning in Los Banos, California.

For example, Vrishin Subramaniam, the founder of CapitalWe, a financial planning firm focused on millennial and younger investors, recommends investing between 2% and 5% of net assets in cryptocurrency.

If anyone is looking to buy into Coinbase, Subramaniam recommends putting that investment in the 5% cryptocurrency investment basket. Going forward, “we can increase this allocation for listed securities after a few quarters once we have more information in the public domain,” he said.

“Since Coinbase and other platforms have made it convenient to own cryptocurrency, I think the best way to get the word out about cryptocurrency is through direct cryptocurrency ownership,” said Graciano Rubio of Infinity Financial Planning in Los Banos, California.

There is a metaphor for the moment that includes the mid-19th century California gold rush. “You can either look for gold (your own crypto) or sell shovels (your own Coinbase share). They each have unique risks and benefits, but both can be a successful strategy for capitalizing on cryptocurrency, ”he said.

Younger baker donates college lunch cash to fellow Solar Prairie college students

SUN PRAIRIE (WKOW) – A sixth grader from Sun Prairie discovered the baking bug during the pandemic and is now using her talents to help her fellow students.

Keena Schroeder has a cheesecake shop called “Bug’s Bakery” – Bug is her nickname.

Schröder and her father thought about how they could use the money they brought in.

She takes $ 5 from the sale of each cheesecake and donates it to the school district’s Hunger Hero campaign.

“He raised the Hunger Heroes, which means it’s a campaign to raise money for kids who can’t afford lunch at school. And I thought that sounds really good, especially because it’s like food and I make cheesecake, “he told Schröder.

On Monday evening, Schröder presented the school board with a check for USD 1,000. The young baker will continue to bake cheesecakes as long as people want to buy them.

Enterprise funding soars to document $64 billion in Q1, Ernst & Younger says

After a boom year for the tech industry, investors invested money in grocery shipping companies, online brokers, and more in early 2021 Elon Musk’s SpaceX, resulting in a record quarter for US venture finance.

Venture-backed firms raised $ 64 billion in the first three months of the year. This came out of an analysis by Ernst & Young this week that used data from Crunchbase. That’s 43% of the $ 1.48 billion raised in all of 2020, a record year.

“We’re still technically in a pandemic and trying to get out of it,” he said Jeff Grabow, US venture capitalist at Ernst & Young, in an interview. “A year ago everyone thought we were falling into the abyss. To have a record quarter like this is pretty amazing.”

Grabow said while we are clearly on track to see a fourth straight year of $ 100 billion in venture funding, “the question is – will there be a $ 200 billion year?”

The late-stage market continued at a rapid pace after a historic second half of the year for IPOs that included offers from Snowflake, With the Dash and Airbnb. The first two quarters of 2020 were calm as companies changed their plans due to Covid-19, but the market recovered dramatically and continued.

Grabow said there were 183 venture deals worth at least $ 100 million in the first quarter, more than half of last year’s total. The biggest business was the autonomous car company Cruise’s $ 2 billion funding Round in January, led by Microsoft as part of a strategic agreement with General Motors, Majority owner of Cruise.

Digital supermarket Gopuff raised $ 1.15 billion in March for the second largest deal of the quarter. Cloud data analysis software provider Databricks raised $ 1 billion during the reporting period, as did the investment in the app Robin Hoodwho needed liquidity after wild trading GameStop left the company in a financial crisis.

The largest sub-billion dollar round was for private space companies SpaceX, which raised $ 850 million in February, valued at approximately $ 74 billion. The payment software company was also among the top offers Stripe raises $ 600 million at a valuation of $ 95 billion.

In addition to the increasing number of mega-rounds, the early-stage market is also brand new. Grabow said there was record funding on Series A and B deals in the first quarter.

Smaller funds are popping up from week to week, and the AngelList website also allows investors to bring together syndicates of people who want to raise money for startups without networking locally. With so much capital in the system and the advent of virtual dealmaking ZoomingVenture rounds come together much faster than in the past.

“There’s been a lot of buoyancy and excitement in the market because people believe we got through Covid,” Grabow said. “The digitization and technological enablement of the industry has been carried over to steroids.”

The record level of venture investing coincides with the phenomenon of special purpose vehicles (SPACs), or blank check companies, which private companies acquire and go public. SPACs are a possible alternative to late-stage rounds.

As early as 2021, 306 SPACs raised $ 98.9 billion SPACInsider. This surpasses the $ 83.4 billion raised throughout 2020 Record year. Grabow admits that between traditional funding and SPACs venturing into a company, there are sure to be investors taking undue risk.

“It’s called Venture for a reason,” Grabow said. “These are high return situations that involve high risk.”

CLOCK: Elon Musk wants to connect vehicles to the internet

New on DVD: ‘Promising Younger Girl’ | Arts & Leisure

“Promising Young Woman”: Carey Mulligan makes a memorable performance in this daring rape-revenge fantasy, the directorial debut of Emerald Fennell, an English actress and showrunner in the second season of “Killing Eve”.

Mulligan is Cassie, a medical school dropout who spends her nights in bars looking for men to take her home. In smeared makeup and high heels with a convincing head-slack, she appears drunk and helpless and follows her compulsions before dropping the act and taking revenge, wrote Tribune News Service critic Katie Walsh in her review.

“Fennell’s movie isn’t overly bloody, but it has the setting and tone of a horror movie rendered in cupcake colors. Cassie uses her ultra-feminine portrayal of long blonde locks, flowers and garish makeup as armor, disguise and as a weapon in their war, “she wrote. “It is a reflection of the internal logic of the film that nothing is what it seems. The script is based on constant revelations that lead the viewer down a path before tearing the carpet out.”

“Brothers by Blood”: This crime drama takes place in the city of brotherly love and shows the violent world of organized crime in Philadelphia. Stars Matthias Schoenaerts, Joel Kinnaman and Maika Monroe.

“Des”: David Tennant portrays the Scottish serial killer Dennis Nilsen, arrested in 1983, in this three-part TV miniseries.

“Don’t Tell a Soul”: Fionn Whitehead and Jack Dylan Grazer are teenage brothers who steal money to help their sick mother, played by Mena Suvari, while they take on Rainn Wilson’s security guard character.

“Money Plane”: This robbery thriller finds an indebted thief who has one last job to do with a team of the world’s most dangerous criminals. Stars Adam Copeland, Kelsey Grammer, Thomas Jane.

“PG: Psycho Goreman”: Nita-Josee Hanna and Owen Myre are siblings who are finding a gem that they can use to control an ancient monster and draw all sorts of unwanted attention to their little town.

“Sheep and Wolves: Pig Deal”: The sheep and wolves live peacefully in this Russian-language animated film until two unexpected guests pass by.

“Songbird”: Inspired by last year’s health crisis, this 2024 film follows a handful of characters amid a global pandemic. Stars KJ Apa, Sofia Carson and Craig Robinson.

© 2021 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

Copyright 2021 Tribune Content Agency.

Promising Younger Girl dominates 20201 Hollywood Critics Affiliation Awards | Arts & Leisure

“Promising Young Woman” was the big winner of the 2021 Hollywood Critics Association Awards.

Emerald Fennell’s black comedy starring Carey Mulligan as Cassie Thomas dominated the evening and won several awards including “Best Picture” and “Best Actress” for the 35-year-old star.

Receiving her awards on video call Carey said, “This opportunity really was the chance of a lifetime and I am so grateful to her.”

The director and screenwriter also won Best Original Screenplay, Best First Feature, and Best Filmmaker On The Rise.

Emerald, also 35, said of the earlier honor, “It just seems extraordinary that this script that I had on my mind for years listened to Paris Hilton and Britney Spears until it all had a pink, sparkling blur for it to come all the way to Hollywood and to receive this incredible honor is truly extraordinary. “

The thriller follows a young woman who was traumatized by a tragic event in her past and seeks revenge on those who have crossed her path.

During the virtual ceremony on Friday evening (March 5th, 21st) greats like “Nomadland”, “Sound of Metal”, “Da 5 Bloods”, “The Invisible Man”, “Birds of Prey” and “Minari” were honored. .

A number of special awards were also presented, including the Trailblazer Award given to Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson.

The wrestler-turned-actor was recognized for “advocating important issues and advocating change”.

A clip played showing the ‘Jumanji’ star’s efforts to support the Black Lives Matter movement and highlight his charitable work.

Moved by the video, he said, “My friends, who I have known and grown with, all of you over the years as we have walked this trail – and what a privilege it was and what an honor it was it was to receive that honor from you. “

Elsewhere, Zack Snyder took home the Valiant Award and the Impact Award went to ‘Judas And The Black Messiah’.

The latter follows the story of Black Panther Party chairman Fred Hampton (Daniel Kaluuya) and FBI infiltrator William O’Neal (Lakeith Stanfield).

Scott Menzel, Founder of HCA, said in a statement: “While 2020 has been a difficult year for many people around the world, we are the filmmakers, storytellers and studios who have gone out of their way to find new ways to meet their To publish films to forever grateful audience. The films nominated by members of the Hollywood Critics Association were some of the most diverse and comprehensive stories we have seen on screen in quite some time. Our mission has always been to highlight all of the votes and I believe this will be reflected in our winners tonight. Congratulations everyone. “

As suicides rise, younger survivors make case for hope in movie | Leisure

LOS ANGELES (AP) – “Every and Every Day” represents studies of courage, both in life and in the MTV documentary about young people and suicide.

In open and insightful conversations, nine survivors share what marginalized them and how they struggled and continue to struggle to continue to lay claim to themselves and their right to life.

With young people suicides, which have already increased in recent years, and the relentless pandemic that is under pressure, a film that gives voice to those who attempted or considered suicide is gaining urgency. It will air ad-free on MTV on Tuesday at 9:00 p.m. EST.

One young person, a college student named Hannah, did not hesitate when invited by director Alexandra Shiva and executive producer Sheila Nevins to take part in the project. (The last names of the participants have been omitted from the documentation.)

“It was an instant ‘yes’,” said Hannah in an interview. “I have to do this, I have to take this opportunity to tell my story. Hopefully the kids and people out there who watch will hear my story. Hopefully they will see that I have overcome so many obstacles and they can too.”

She emphasized what others say in the film: It’s important to realize that you can’t do it alone.

“I had really big problems and I didn’t reach out for help and if I didn’t reach for help it almost killed me,” said Hannah. “I really want you to see what not to do.”

Family and friends also play a crucial role, Shiva said.

“If you think someone is thinking about suicide, ask them. If you talk about it, someone is no longer at risk,” she said.

According to a September 2020 report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the suicide rate among people ages 10 to 24 rose 57.4% from 6.8 per 100,000 in 2007 to 10.7 im from 2007 to 2018 By comparison, the report said the rate had been statistically stable from 2000 to 2007.

The pandemic appears to be further undermining mental health in America. According to a survey published by the CDC last August, young adults ages 18 to 24 are among the groups most susceptible to thoughts of suicide.

“Every and Every Day” does not deal with statistics or experts, but gives the floor to the participants and their individual stories. There is also a group zoom discussion where the young adults can connect with each other and indirectly with the audience.

With quiet, undramatic honesty, they talk about how long they’ve battled depression – many since middle school – and what it took to realize that they couldn’t survive without support. For colored people, skeptical attitudes of the community towards mental health treatment and the pressure of expectations are cited as further burdens.

“I grew up with the idea of ​​always having to be perfect, always having to represent black excellence,” said Hannah.

Latino and Indian American participants said they addressed the prejudice that psychological problems are shameful, while LGBTQ participants share their own burdens. Others in the film prove that no one is exempt, including those who come from happy homes, wealth, or who avoid facing ethnic or other prejudices.

The filmmakers wanted to make sure that “we had enough experience so that someone who tunes into MTV doesn’t feel like they’re not represented. They can actually see themselves in someone,” Shiva said. The film will also be available on mtv.com and the MTV app and later Pluto TV.

Attempts were also made to include the very different therapies, some of which contained medication and some of which did not, that the participants found valuable.

The Jed Foundation, which aims to promote emotional health and prevent suicide among teenagers and young adults, partnered with MTV Documentary Films on the project and was one of the groups Shiva and producer Lindsey Megrue looked for after participants helped.

Donna Satow of the foundation said she admires the brave openness of those in Every and Every Day and believes they will carry weight with their peers who watch the film. She and her husband Phil started the foundation after losing their youngest son Jed to suicide in 1998.

“So many young people suffer in silence. They really don’t want to talk about these feelings,” said Donna Satow. “So when you see your own age group speak and speak in a language that they actually speak and understand, it is powerful and really takes the conversation to the next step.”

As suicides rise, younger survivors make case for hope in movie | Leisure

“I grew up with the idea of ​​always having to be perfect, always having to represent black excellence,” said Hannah.

Latino and Indian American participants said they addressed the prejudice that psychological problems are shameful, while LGBTQ participants share their own burdens. Others in the film prove that no one is exempt, including those who come from happy homes, wealth, or who avoid facing ethnic or other prejudices.

The filmmakers wanted to make sure that “we had enough experience so that someone who tunes in to MTV doesn’t feel like they’re not represented. You can actually see yourself in someone, ”said Shiva. The film will also be available on mtv.com and the MTV app and later Pluto TV.

Attempts were also made to include the very different therapies, some of which contained medication and some of which did not, that the participants found valuable.

The Jed Foundation, which aims to promote emotional health and prevent suicide among teenagers and young adults, MTV Documentary Films partnered on the project and was among the groups that helped Shiva and producer Lindsey Megrue find participants.

Donna Satow of the foundation said she admires the brave openness of those in Every and Every Day and believes they will carry weight with their peers who watch the film. She and her husband Phil started the foundation after losing their youngest son Jed to suicide in 1998.