Morgan Stanley to bar employees with out Covid vaccinations from workplaces

Morgan Stanley announced to its staff on Tuesday that workers and customers who are not vaccinated against Covid-19 will be banned from returning to the New York City and Westchester County offices with a large staff presence from July 12, CNBC has confirmed.

All Morgan Stanley employees in the New York area must now confirm their coronavirus vaccination status by July 1.

Employees who are not fully vaccinated will still have to work remotely, the company told workers on Tuesday.

The move that will allow Morgan Stanley to lift masking and physical distancing requirements in its offices follows similar moves by other financial giants.

Black stone said last month that US workers in investment areas could return to their offices full-time on June 7 if they are fully vaccinated against the coronavirus.

Goldman Sachs cleverly Employees issued a memo earlier this month asking them to disclose their vaccination status.

Morgan Stanley had previously only requested that employees in certain areas of the company be fully vaccinated in order to return to their offices.

The Financial Times first reported Tuesday that Morgan Stanley, citing a company memo would require employees, customers, and visitors to the New York area to be fully vaccinated to enter corporate workplaces in New York City and Westchester County.

Myanmar migrant staff work overseas to feed their households. Now they cannot ship the cash dwelling

“I left him with my mother,” said the 26-year-old migrant worker from Myanmar, who lives in Thailand.

Every morning long lines of people wait for hours in front of banks and ATMs across Myanmar. Withdrawal limits were limited to around 200,000 kyat ($ 120 USD) per customer per day and some even run out of cash as people stop depositing money for security reasons.

“If I send money home, my family can usually withdraw the money the next day,” said Su. “But lately the internet has been down and it’s difficult to get the money out, and we don’t think we can trust the bank either.”

Su and Zaw, migrant workers in Bangkok, Thailand in May 2021.Su and her husband are among the 1.7 million Myanmar citizens who work in neighboring Thailand, according to the Migrant Workers Group, are part of an important network of foreign workers who support relatives at home. The International Labor Organization (ILO) Estimates About $ 1.4 billion was sent to Myanmar by foreign workers in 2015.

The current situation is gone Thousands of migrants live with it constant concern not only for the financial well-being of loved ones, but also for their safety. More than 860 people have been killed by security forces since the coup and more than 6,000 have been arrested, according to the AAPP.

Su’s mother tells her not to worry as the fighting in her village is not intense. “But you have to be careful,” said Su. “They no longer sleep soundly and hardly ever go out.”

But without money to stock up on food or medicine, it will not be easy to fall by the wayside in the long term.

“I want to work in Myanmar again because we have so many difficulties working in other countries and I want to live at home with my family too,” she said.

But she is afraid of what could happen if she and her husband Zaw, 30, who also works in a factory in Bangkok, return. “If we try to go back, they will arrest us even if we are not involved in politics,” she said.

Zaw speaks of the agony of watching his country rise from a distance while the Myanmar military, the Tatmadaw, continue their brutal crackdown on opponents of the coup. “I can’t go back and fight,” he said. “Even if I don’t mind risking my life for the next generation, I want real democracy in my country.”

Rising poverty in Myanmar

Prior to the coup, Christina’s older brother typically sent home up to $ 240 a month, which his family of 10 depended on for food and medicine. All of that stopped after the coup when the banks closed.

Christina, who uses a pseudonym for security reasons, said the family had to leave their home in Mindat city, southern Chin state, Myanmar. when the fighting started there. Now, it is not just the food they need.

“Because we’re in a place where there are no doctors and nurses, even with a headache, we have trouble buying medication because it’s been a few months,” she said.

Nor can they return home to grow new plants that they have relied on for food and for sale, so will the next few years was difficult, she said. You are currently living in a camp for internally displaced persons.

As bombs fall on Myanmar's hotbeds of rural resistance, tens of thousands flee into the jungle without food or water

Wai, who also uses a pseudonym for security reasons, said his brother works in Thailand and sent home $ 150-180 a month to his elderly mother, who lives alone in her village. She used it as medicine when he said her health was deteriorating. Wai said his mother saved some of the remittances, but in a month her reserves would be used up.

“Since I have family, I cannot support them either. My brother can’t send money. So mom uses her savings to support herself and has to borrow from other family members in the village, ”said Wai.

“I sell groceries in the factories and we were fine before the coup. But after the coup most of the factories are closed and I couldn’t sell any more. So we fight. So I asked my brother to send me some money. He said he would do that. But since we could not receive from here, our family is also in trouble. “

A Report published The United Nations estimated in late April that by early 2022, up to half of Myanmar’s population could be living in poverty due to “aggravating negative shocks”. The report found that 83% of Myanmar households own theirs The incomes had almost halved on average because of the Covid pandemic.

This situation has worsened since the coup.

Fear for family safety

Ma Oo has lived in Thailand for 20 years, helping migrant workers obtain documents for legal work and advocating for their rights. Their children studied in Thailand and are now working in the countryside. But she is worried about the rest of her family who stayed in Shan State in Myanmar.

Her father, she said, worked as a public relations organizer for the National League for Democracy (NLD), the democratically elected party that was overthrown by the military coup. Ma Oo suspects her father was arrested, but even now, four months later, she is unsure.

“The military has arrested everyone involved with the NLD. I lost touch with my father when I heard about the coup. I worry about my entire family as we are all involved in the party. Mine Father was arrested twice in the 1990s for being involved with NLD and now we assume he was arrested again because we lost touch with him. “

Not knowing the whereabouts or well-being of family members affected by the crackdown on the military junta is traumatizing for those unable to return home.

Ma Oo, migrant rights lawyer in Bangkok, Thailand in May 2021

Kyokyani, 35, works in a bakery in Bangkok. His wife works in a textile factory, but his 85-year-old mother is too frail to take part from her village in Myanmar’s Mandalay region.

Kyokyani, who also wants to be identified by name for security reasons, said his older brother was recently arrested by security forces and held for three days. “The military is putting our village under pressure because of the protests and wanted to arrest the leaders of the protests. But they couldn’t find her, so they arrested my brother, ”he said.

“I’m very sad and worried about my family,” he said, adding that most of the villagers are day laborers and struggle to make ends meet. “I can’t go back and help them and that worries me even more.”

Kyokyani said the business collapsed after Covid and he couldn’t send as much money home as he usually did. The coup made things worse and he’s been unable to send money since the military took power.

Sustaining yourself is a challenge.

“There are fewer jobs here in Thailand and I still have to spend on my accommodation and food, so I can’t make as much as I did before,” he said.

Myat, a migrant worker in Bangkok, Thailand in May 2021. The migrant worker colleague Myat fears for the safety of his family. His relative worked at a gold mine in the southeastern state of Kayah, which employed 11 workers allegedly killed during a military air raid in late March.

He said his relative wasn’t working that day but asks why the miners were targeted in the first place. “I can’t stand it. They are innocent people from the forest. I don’t think they even have an internet, so they wouldn’t have known what was happening,” he said.

He stared at a photo of one of the victims on his cell phone and said, “I’m not just concerned about my family, but the whole country. I worry about everyone because they kill teenagers. The youth are Myanmar’s future, but they value them less than animals. “

For Su and Zaw, whose 7-year-old is still with his grandparents in Myanmar, it is almost too much to think about his future without sending money to an upside-down country.

“I am very worried about my child as a mother. We have heard that the military is putting people in our village, especially the boys and men, into slave labor so that they cannot sleep soundly at night,” said Su.

“I miss my child. I cannot go back to him because of the dire situation. I am sad.”

CNN’s Salai TZ and Kocha Olarn contributed to the coverage.

Leisure employees react to Florida pulling out of Pandemic Unemployment Help Program

Florida has withdrawn from the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance Program. For people in central Florida who have been relying on that extra money, the future seems a little more uncertain was on leave and those waiting for the green light to get back to work. Other federal benefits will continue but will expire on September 6. For Ocoee’s 28-year-old Aaron Davison, who is a Universal on leave employee who found out the federal unemployment program, which brought in an additional $ 300 a week, will end next month, feared he didn’t want to see it again. “It will hit me and my family hard when we face the possibility and inevitably live our car again,” said Davison. His parents are disabled and his mother is terminally ill. He’s the only breadwinner, and they’ve been through so much. “Before the vacation and the pandemic, we had lost our home to foreclosure and were evicted just a few weeks before Christmas in late 2019,” Davison said. They lived in their car for months until the parks closed, then in hotels for over a year. “They still drove me to work every day so I could at least make paycheck to paycheck so we could at least have hot meals,” said Davison, saying, “It’s mean, it’s just mean,” said Paul Cox, chairman of one Union that represents approximately 3,000 backstage workers employed in the live entertainment industry in central Florida. “So it’s going to be an absolute disaster for our employees,” said Cox. They are skilled workers from fireworks at Disney World to live trade shows and concerts. As a tourism industry, will we feel the effects in Florida like our bread and butter? Cox says it will. “It will be a domino effect.” That will affect the hospitality industry, it will affect the retail industry, it will affect, affect, affect, affect, “said Cox.” It’s literally just pulling the carpet Among them, those who will be able to find work elsewhere are likely to look for work and leave the industry. “He says for those who are not so lucky, they might end up on the grocery lines again.

Florida has withdrawn from the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance Program.

For people in central Florida who have relied on that extra cash, the future seems a little more uncertain.

Connected: Florida will cut its $ 300 weekly unemployment benefit program

This is especially true for those who have been on vacation and are waiting for the green light to get back to work.

Other federal benefits will remain in place, but will expire on September 6th.

For 28-year-old Aaron Davison of Ocoee, who is a general-purpose worker on leave, fears that the federal unemployment program, which raised an additional $ 300 a week, would end next month was a fear he won’t experience again wanted.

“It will be hard for me and my family when we face the possibility and inevitable life in our car again,” said Davison.

His parents are disabled and his mother is terminally ill. He’s the only breadwinner, and they’ve been through so much.

“Before the vacation and the pandemic, we had lost our home to foreclosure and were evicted just a few weeks before Christmas in late 2019,” Davison said.

They lived in their car for months until the parks closed, then in hotels for over a year.

“They still drove me to work every day so I could at least make paycheck to paycheck so we could at least have hot meals,” Davison said.

“It’s mean, it’s just mean,” said Paul Cox, chairman of a union that represents about 3,000 backstage workers in the live entertainment industry in central Florida.

“So it’s going to be an absolute disaster for our employees,” said Cox.

They are skilled workers from fireworks at Disney World to live trade shows and concerts.

As the tourism industry, as our bread and butter, will we feel the effects of this in Florida?

Cox says it will be a domino effect.

“It’s going to affect the restaurant industry, it’s going to affect retailing, it’s going to affect, affect, affect, affect,” said Cox.

“It’s literally just about pulling the rug out from under them. Those who can find work elsewhere are likely to look for work and leave the industry.”

He says for those who are not so lucky, they might end up back on the food lines.

Lin-Manuel Miranda, mayor open new Instances Sq. vaccine web site for leisure staff

The lights went out on Broadway in March 2020.

Most of the stages remain dark and the seats are empty, but when vaccination begins in New York, the city set up a vaccination clinic in Times Square for the theater, film, and television communities only.

“We want to meet again and tell stories in the dark. We can’t do that if we don’t feel safe and you don’t feel safe, ”said award-winning playwright and performer Lin-Manuel Miranda on Monday.

He and Mayor Bill de Blasio visited the new vaccination center at 20 Times Square. It opened up to people both on stage and in front of the camera and behind the scenes. The city has been working to make the arts work.

“Yes, it’s part of our economy, more importantly, it’s part of our identity. It’s part of who we are. It’s part of our heart, ”said Mayor de Blasio.

Emily Pecoraro was thrilled to play her alto saxophone during a performance in Father Duffy Square on Monday. She said she was eager to get back in theaters.

“With a little optimism and a little organization, we can do it,” she said.

Media and Entertainment Commissioner Anne del Castillo said the city was continuing to reopen Broadway in September.

“That’s why we wanted to set this up. So we could all get vaccinated and they could start working and rehearsing, ”said Commissioner del Castillo.

The vaccination center is manned by unemployed theater workers.

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Ann Arbor space drag troupe to lift cash for pharmacy employees Friday

ANN ARBOR, me. – Play virtual bingo and help local pharmacy workers get gift cards.

Starting Friday night at 8 p.m., Boylesque Michigan will host a virtual bingo show to raise funds for gift cards issued to pharmacy workers in the area.

The event consists of three rounds of bingo and three rounds of entertainment by artists from the Ypsilanti-based drag troupe.

The bingo show is recommended for those aged 18 and over. Half of all show proceeds and tips go towards buying gift cards, according to the event page.

Participants will receive a personalized bingo card and a link to the event on the Friday before the event.

Tickets are $ 25 and can be purchased here through Eventbrite.

Bingo is played through zoom, so participants must have video and microphone capabilities on the device they are using Facebook event page says.

display

During the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, Boylesque Michigan has used the entertaining skills of its performers to raise funds for frontline workers, nonprofits, causes, and community members in need.

Over 150 virtual shows have been shown since the pandemic began. said Boylesque CEO Jadein Black in January. The troop previously raised money through fundraisers at local entertainment venues and restaurants, but switched to virtual shows to adapt to the pandemic.

Copyright 2021 by WDIV ClickOnDetroit – All rights reserved.

Spring break: For Cancún employees, it is their cash or their well being

American tourists who rub against the rules of social distancing and are impatient with the introduction of coronavirus vaccines are returning to Cancun.

William Cruz can’t decide whether to welcome them or worry about a new wave of coronavirus cases.

“Should gringos come here?” asked the father of two children. Who is waiting for tables in the popular tourist area of ​​the city.

He knows he needs her badly.

He was forced to close a beer business he owned after revenue collapsed last year. Does he want outsiders to come to Cancun?

Cruz answers his own question. First he says, “I would say no … because you are risking infecting your family and us.”

Then he thinks about what it would mean to lose another job. “So let her come,” he said, laughing at the contradiction. “What I think most of all is the money to bring something home.”

Beach goers hit the sand and surf in Cancun.

James Hayes, 46, and Anthony Rega, 43, of New Jersey pose for a portrait at the Grand Oasis Cancun Resort on March 20.

Visitors speak to a server at the Mandala Beach Club, a popular tourist destination.

Tourists pose for photos at the Forum By the Sea shopping mall.

Beach goers relax in Cancun.

TOP LEFT: James Hayes, 46, and Anthony Rega, 43, of New Jersey pose for a portrait at the Grand Oasis Cancun Resort on March 20. ABOVE RIGHT: Visitors are talking to a server at the Mandala Beach Club, a popular tourist destination. BOTTOM LEFT: Tourists pose for photos at Forum By the Sea Mall. BOTTOM RIGHT: Beachgoers relax in Cancun.

TOP: Beachgoers go to the sand and surf in Cancun. TOP LEFT: James Hayes, 46, and Anthony Rega, 43, of New Jersey pose for a portrait at the Grand Oasis Cancun Resort on March 20. ABOVE RIGHT: Visitors are talking to a server at the Mandala Beach Club, a popular tourist destination. BOTTOM LEFT: Tourists pose for photos at Forum By the Sea Mall. BOTTOM RIGHT: Beachgoers relax in Cancun.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have sponsored Americans avoid any trip to Mexico. More than 2 million coronavirus cases have been detected in the country to date, and Mexico has the third highest number of Covid-19 deaths in the world.

According to Mexico’s four-level, color-coded “traffic light” system, the state of Quintana Roo is classified as phase yellow. Hotels and restaurants are allowed to open, but they are 60 percent busy, and nightclubs must be completely closed.

But with tourists apparently wanting to keep partying, economic pressures make Cancun difficult to think about turning away visitors.

Anyeli Rondon, 17, will receive a coronavirus test in Cancun on March 19 before returning to Venezuela.

Anyeli Rondon, 17, will receive a coronavirus test in Cancun on March 19 before returning to Venezuela.

Tourism accounts for 87 percent of the state’s gross domestic product. “So if something happens to tourism, it happens to all of us,” said Marisol Vanegas, Quintana Roo tourism secretary.

The city recorded more than 6 million tourists in 2019. That number fell to nearly half in 2020 as countries closed because of the pandemic, Vanegas said.

But the Tourists are back This year, Vanegas is forecasting 5 million arrivals in 2021.

According to Vanegas, many of these visitors are American, with visitors from Texas topping the list.

“The reason is that North Americans cannot travel to Europe,” said Vanegas. “Many of the airlines are rerouting flights to Cancun as an alternative.”

A man pushes luggage in Cancun’s hotel zone.

Visitors crowd elevators at the Grand Oasis Cancun Resort.

A worker sets up tables for a seaside wedding reception.

Staff greet the guests in the Mandala Night Club.

Visitors stroll through a touristy area known as the Hotel Zone.

TOP LEFT: Visitors are pushing elevators at the Grand Oasis Cancún Resort. Above right: A worker sets up tables for a wedding reception by the sea. BOTTOM LEFT: Employees greet the guests in the Mandala Night Club. BOTTOM RIGHT: Visitors walk through a touristy area known as the Hotel Zone.

TOP: A man is pushing luggage in Cancun’s hotel zone. TOP LEFT: Visitors are pushing elevators at the Grand Oasis Cancún Resort. Above right: A worker sets up tables for a wedding reception by the sea. BOTTOM LEFT: Employees greet the guests in the Mandala Night Club. BOTTOM RIGHT: Visitors walk through a touristy area known as the Hotel Zone.

The economic boom poses a health risk for workers, especially in some overcrowded nightclubs on Kukulcán Boulevard that stay open by serving food and therefore technically qualify as restaurant bars.

Rigoberto Trujillo, 32, a security guard at a nightclub on the tourist strip, says he is worried about contracting the virus but is even more worried about being out of work.

In the early days of the pandemic, his hours were shortened to a few days a week. With the arrival of the spring break, he’s back to full-time. But his fear of the virus remains.

“We’re trying to provide good service,” he said. “I want this service to continue, so I have to take care of myself too.” Every evening he takes off his work clothes before entering his house and then takes a shower before greeting his family.

Guests cheer for a mariachi band at the Grand Oasis Cancun Resort.

Guests cheer for a mariachi band at the Grand Oasis Cancun Resort.

On one final evening, night owls – many exposed – grabbed a popular nightclub on Kukulcán Boulevard. Masked security guards patted maskless tourists before joining at least 100 others.

Scantily clad dancers appeared in feathered headgear and iridescent face masks. When the show was over, house music played and revelers flooded the dance floor. Masked waiters walked through the crowd with trays of drinks.

Hundreds of partygoers lined up across the street to watch an indoor cabaret show. A representative from the club said the arena holds 1,500 people and is 40 percent full.

Dancers perform on stage in a Cancun nightclub.

A member of staff checks the temperature of the guests at the Coco Bongo Show and Disco.

Patrons watch masked performers in the Congo Bar.

A staff member gives a guest a chance at Coco Bongo Show and Disco.

A worker cleans while clerks and party-goers dance at the Coco Bongo Show and Disco.

TOP LEFT: A member of staff checks the temperature of the guests at the Coco Bongo Show and Disco. Above right: Patrons watch masked performers in the Congo Bar. BOTTOM LEFT: An employee gives a guest a chance at the Coco Bongo Show and Disco. BOTTOM RIGHT: A worker cleaning while clerks and party goers dance at the Coco Bongo Show and Disco.

TOP: Dancers perform on stage in a Cancun nightclub. TOP LEFT: A member of staff checks the temperature of the guests at the Coco Bongo Show and Disco. Above right: Patrons watch masked performers in the Congo Bar. BELOW LEFT: An employee gives a guest a chance at the Coco Bongo Show and Disco. BOTTOM RIGHT: A worker cleans while clerks and party goers dance at the Coco Bongo Show and Disco.

The state government has strictly enforced partial capacity in restaurants across the state, and hotels have limited capacity – some businesses have closed for disregarding the measures.

But it seems that this Cancun party strip club has found a way around the restrictions.

The tourist-filled nightclubs have not escaped Miriam Cortés, president of the Quintana Roo Vacation Club Association.

“Despite all the evidence, the authorities did not act. It’s not like it’s hidden. You walk down the street and see it. You see it every day, ”she said of the clubs full of tourists. “We are outraged.”

She said she was concerned about service industry workers in compromised conditions. “But we’re also concerned that people can eat,” she said. International tourists returning to some countries such as the US are required to provide a negative test before boarding their home flights.

And if an international traveler tests positive for the coronavirus in Cancun, many hotels promise to offer a two-week quarantine stay for free. However, the quarantine is not strictly enforced – and even some tests have been questioned.

In a case in Cancun almost two weeks ago it was found that a non-accredited laboratory had given incorrect coronavirus tests up to 44 Argentine tourists.

Mexican authorities said the tourists had negative tests before boarding a plane to Argentina. When they got to their destination, the tourists were given another test and all 44 were positive for covid.

Bartenders prepare for visitors to come to the Coco Bongo Show and Disco.

Bartenders prepare for visitors to come to the Coco Bongo Show and Disco.

Ellie Langdon, a 19-year-old student from Minnesota, had visited one of the clubs on the party strip the night before. She said the restrictions in the United States are excessive.

“If I’m not sick, I won’t put my whole life on hold,” she said. “You should come here. And you should have the best time and get your money’s worth, because it’s vacation and you won’t come to Cancun and not live it.”

She did not intend to be quarantined when she returned home.

Anthony Rega, a 43-year-old New Jersey mortgage broker who was on vacation with a friend, said he, too, went to the clubs on the Strip. “Everyone was there on top of each other,” he said of partiers who did not observe social distancing.

He said he hadn’t seen quarantine for two weeks as long as he wasn’t feeling sick.

“If after a day or two I feel okay – obviously I got a negative test home – I’ll think it’s clear to sail from there.”

A discarded mask is immersed in a pool in the Grand Oasis Cancún.

A discarded mask is immersed in a pool in the Grand Oasis Cancún.

Name for motion: Gadgets wanted for CMA’s donation drive for stay leisure employees

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WKRN) – A call by the CMAs to support those in need in the local music industry.

The Country Music Association is holding a fundraising campaign for COVID Support (MICS) for the music industry at their office in Music Square East, Nashville, March 15-19.

The event will benefit Musically Fed, which has been serving more than 180,000 meals nationwide to people working in the live music and entertainment industries as of March 2020. Around 22,000 meals were distributed here in Nashville.

A CMA spokesperson said there are two ways to donate – online and in person.

If you would like to donate online, you will be asked to order items from Musically the Fed’s Amazon Wish List before March 19th. Choose “Country Music Association, c / o gift list from FOOD DRIVE” as delivery address.

You can also donate personally by dropping off the items you need in the alley behind the CMA office.

FOOD Toiletries
Dried pasta & sauce toothpaste
Oatmeal cereals laundry detergent
Canned fish / meat Washing-up liquid
Canned fruit and vegetables Hand soap
Soup, crackers shower gel
Rice, quinoa, dry beans shaving cream
peanut butter toilet paper
nuts Paper towels

The music-fed Food Drive Thrus in Nashville will take place on March 13th and 27th. Live entertainment / music industry people wishing to register should contact us info@musicallyfed.org or call 480-951-1882. To learn more, visit MusicallyFed.org.

Extra COVID aid cash for important employees and first responders in NY

BUFFALO, NY (WKBW) – Governor Cuomo announced that $ 29 million will be available to support key workers and first responders through the Empire Pandemic Response Reimbursement Fund program.

Up to US $ 1,000 per household is available from private donations.

The program aims to provide out-of-pocket reimbursement for childcare, transportation, housing and other qualified expenses that enabled workers to carry out their duties.

Workers should be referred by employers, trade unions or social service providers who can review employment during the COVID emergency.

Families earning up to 500 percent of federal poverty, or $ 125,470 for a family of four, can apply for funds to cover the expenses.

The money comes from private donations from individuals, charitable foundations, and corporations made during the COVID crisis.

Unemployed employees are hit with one other shock: Many owe the federal government cash for medical insurance

According to the federal government, Ryan made too much money off unemployment. It was more money than she would have made as a preschool teacher, and it bumped her into a different income bracket that reduced her insurance subsidy under the Affordable Care Act. Desperate to keep health insurance in the middle of the pandemic, she’s trying to figure out how to pay the big bill.

“Where do I get all the money to pay back during the pandemic?” said Ryan, 50, who lives in Bergen County, New Jersey. “What did you expect from us? Drop Obamacare During Pandemic? “

Ryan is one of the million Americans facing surprisingly high tax burdens amid a global health crisis. She was finally able to go back to work in a daycare center but says she doesn’t have $ 3,100. She used the savings she had to move from Pennsylvania to New Jersey when a job opened in her field.

“We’re just trying to get back on our feet and we’re now overwhelmed with all the bills we owe,” said Ryan, who lives with her boyfriend.

Congress is trying to fix this problem so that low-income Americans won’t drop their health insurance because they can’t afford it. The $ 1.9 trillion stimulus package, expected to be passed in mid-March, would forgive these tax burdens. (According to an agreement reached late Friday, households earning less than $ 150,000 would also save taxes on the first $ 10,200 in unemployment income.)

Politicians and health experts say the United States needs to keep as many people as possible covered by health insurance during the deadly pandemic. But this subsidy problem that Ryan and millions of others are now facing makes it difficult.

Low-income workers and the self-employed typically turn to the Affordable Care Act marketplaces for health insurance. If workers earn between $ 18,000 and $ 51,000, they’re eligible for a government grant to make plans more affordable. The catch, however, comes if they got health insurance in November or December 2019 – before the pandemic became a national emergency.

People like Ryan estimated their earnings for 2020 and were far from it, largely because of the additional $ 600 a week Congress made available to the unemployed from April to July. Workers such as preschool teachers, teaching assistants, waiters and the self-employed often benefited more from unemployment than from their regular work last spring. Now they owe money to the government to repay some of their health grants.

This happens to some low-income Americans every year, but experts say it is particularly common now that the livelihoods of so many people have been dramatically disrupted.

According to the Internal Revenue Service, around 3.2 million low-income Americans owed the state money for their health grants in 2018 Data. That number is expected to be over 5 million, according to 2020 Estimates from the Joint Tax Committee and the Kaiser Family Foundation.

“This just goes to show how complicated it is to subsidize people’s health care through the tax system,” said Larry Levitt, executive vice president of health policy for the Kaiser Family Foundation. “In the midst of the enormous uncertainty for the people, it would certainly be helpful if they didn’t have to pay back subsidies for having misreported their income.”

According to the economic stimulus plan, everyone who is unemployed will automatically qualify for the full health insurance subsidy in 2021. If the legislation goes into effect, these Americans won’t get a shock tax bill next year, and they should be able to afford health insurance by now.

Lawyers for the poor hailed these recent initiatives by Congress and the White House, but complained that it had taken lawmakers a year to figure out how to help.

“We have been in a pandemic since March, and nothing has been done by Congress to bring more people to health insurance,” said Tara Straw, a senior health policy analyst at the left-wing Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.

And while there’s a solution along the way, some Americans like Shawn McCreary of Doylestown, Pennsylvania have already paid their taxes – and the credit fine for health insurance.

“That year, I owed $ 3,565 in federal taxes, of which $ 1,300 apparently came from” overpaying “the health exchange because my unemployment was higher than my planned income in November 2019,” McCreary said. “That was a complete surprise to me.”

McCreary, 36, is a special education teacher. He was working as a replacement when the pandemic closed due to the pandemic last March. Since he was a substitute teacher, he was not on the school district’s insurance plan. He had taken out insurance through the health insurance company and said he had even tried to overestimate his 2020 income so as not to pay a fine later, but he was unemployed for most of the year.

As an asthmatic, McCreary already has huge health bills. He was also careful returning to the classroom until he was vaccinated. His grandmother died of Covid-19 in July.

“The pandemic really changed my life from top to bottom,” said McCreary. “I don’t have $ 3,500 to just give back to the government. I almost wish they had paid me less to start with. “

McCreary filed his taxes last month and started a payment plan with the IRS. He will likely have to file an amended statement when Congress passes the stimulus bill that waives the money he owes for the health grant.

For the unemployed, this is another turn in a tough year. Health experts say they just hope the stimulus will go away soon and people will realize they can refill.

Prince William apprehensive about pressure on UK emergency staff | Leisure



In this image provided by Kensington Palace, on January 13, 2021, there is a video call with Prince William of England and his wife, Kate, Duchess of Cambridge, at the bottom of the screen and in the top row from left Carly Kennard and Jules Lockett, both from London, seen Ambulance Service, Conal Devitt of the Formby Primary Care Network, and Manal Sadik, assistant director for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion and Expanding Attendance at Guys and St. Thomas Hospital. Middle row from left, Phil Spencer of the Cleveland Police Department, Tony Collins, Just ‘B’ Volunteer Helpline Answering Machine and CEO of North Yorkshire Hospice Care, and Caroline Francis, Just ‘B’ Helpline Support Person and Nurse at North Yorkshire Hospice Care. The royal couple spoke to frontline workers and counselors about the impact the COVID-19 crisis is having on the mental health of frontline workers and why it is important for them to seek assistance at such a critical time can.


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From DANICA KIRKA Associated Press

LONDON (AP) – Prince William is concerned about the mental health of UK ambulance drivers, police officers and other first responders who have suffered exceptional trauma and death in the wake of the coronavirus cases.

William, a former search and rescue helicopter pilot, told rescue workers on a video call not to be afraid to ask for help, even though they are inclined to help others first.

“I’m afraid … you’re all so busy looking after everyone else that you don’t take enough time to look after yourself and we won’t see the effects for some time,” said William, who second in line British Throne, said on a tape released late Friday.

The UK healthcare system is staggering as a more contagious variant of the coronavirus coupled with cold, wet winter weather puts hospitals and rescue workers under unprecedented pressure.

The London Ambulance Service says they receive around 8,000 emergency calls a day, compared to 5,500 on a typical busy day. However, the strain can be felt in all emergency services. Hundreds of firefighters, for example, have volunteered to drive ambulances in order to ease pressure on the distressed services.

The surge in infections across the UK has pushed the number of people hospitalized with COVID-19 to a record 37,282, more than 70% more than during the first peak of the pandemic in April. The UK has reported 87,448 coronavirus-related deaths, more than any other country in Europe and the fifth highest number in the world.