Sara Madsen Miller’s Type Is a “Distinctive Martini You Will not Discover on Each Menu”

Sara Madsen Miller heads Emmy award-winning video production company 1820 productions as Chief Operating Officer and Executive Producer. Her company has shot commercials, television shows, and documentaries while working with the likes of Frito-Lay, 7-Eleven, and Toyota while producing work for ABC, BET, and Discovery. Here she talks about how her grandmother’s style inspires her today and how it reflects her industry.

What I do: “I run the business and business development for 1820 Productions. I also produce visual content for TV stations, advertising agencies, and corporations. Unofficially, I am called the ‘dream maker’. “

Style icon: “My grandmother was my original style icon. Her daily fashion in the 70s could match the flair of Diana Ross, Olivia Palermo, Beverly Johnson and Iman. “

At work: “My work style is a reflection of my personality and an extension of the creative industry in which I work and which I represent.”

Inspiration: “My husband would say he’s my inspiration, but the truth is, I’m inspired by him and magazines like Essence, In-Style, Vogue and Ebony. “

Style defined: “A unique martini that you won’t find on every menu.”

Fashion essential: “Really cute shoes and a backup pair. “

Go-To-Look: “Midnight black clothes with red lip gloss.”

Equipment: “I put on accessories by adding layers of jewelry and texture, then looking in the mirror and asking myself, ‘Is that too much?’ And then add something. “

Weekend look: “On the weekends I wear comfortable and fun athleisure and chic tracksuits.”

Favorite shop: “I’m a lover of fashion and a great sale so I’m wherever it is. However, if you force me to pick a store, I would go with Bergdorf Goodman 5th Avenue in New York. The shoe sale in December is like taking myself to heaven on earth. “

Gary Gensler says the SEC will not herald a China-style crypto ban, however Congress might | Forex Information | Monetary and Enterprise Information

SEC chairman Gary Gensler.

  • SEC chairman Gary Gensler said the agency will not impose a China-like crypto ban because that authority rests with Congress.
  • Most tokens could be some form of security, he said at an SEC prudential hearing on Tuesday.
  • Gensler asked questions from a lawmaker who beat him up for “brutally” running over investors.
  • Sign up for our daily newsletter here, 10 things before the opening bell.

Gary Gensler said the Securities and Exchange Commission has no plans to ban cryptocurrencies as the authority actually rests with Congress, adding that most tokens pass the test of being some form of security.

The SEC chair did that Comments at a hearing in the House of Representatives Tuesday after Republican lawmaker asked Ted Budd if the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission could follow China in imposing a blanket ban on cryptocurrencies.

“No. I mean, that would be a matter for Congress,” said Gensler.

“I think a lot of these tokens pass the tests of being an investment contract or note or other form of security that we bring into the SEC’s investor protection mandate,” he added.

The concern in the crypto world is that the U.S. government may restrict or ban digital assets, much like it did with gold in 1933. Gensler previously said that crypto exchanges must register with the agency because some of their tokens or products could be securities.

The People’s Bank of China Declared crypto transactions illegal Late last month, a move analysts said was in line with the central bank’s stance over the past decade.

“Our approach is really very different,” Gensler told the House Financial Services Committee.

He noted that the SEC is looking into how the industry can best protect investors and consumers, and comply with anti-money laundering and tax compliance laws. It would also be in the Problems that stablecoins could pose, he added.

Gensler’s comments echoed those recently made by Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell, who said the Federal Reserve had no intention of banning cryptocurrencies.

At the same House hearing, Patrick McHenry asked Gensler on the SEC’s stance on digital assets and reprimanded him for being vague about what a digital asset actually is.

“Some of your comments have raised questions in the marketplace and made things less than clear,” said McHenry. “You made seemingly spontaneous remarks that move the markets, you disregarded rule-making by issuing an out of order statement, and you’ve essentially been rude to American investors.”

Gensler said the agency is following the Administrative Procedures Act, which requires a regulator to issue a general notice of the proposed rule.

McHenry asked Gensler if he a. have reviewed Safe Harbor Proposal created by SEC Commissioner Hester Pierce. The proposal aims to give developers of digital networks a three-year grace period to develop a platform with a registration exemption from federal securities laws.

“Commissioner Peirce and I discussed your thoughts on a possible safe haven,” said Gensler. “I think the challenge for the American public is that if we don’t monitor this and put in place investor protection, people will be hurt.”

Continue reading: Altcoins to Buy: These 15 little-known and undervalued tokens could see an ether-style spike due to significant developer interest, according to Bank of America

France and Australia agree submarines will not cease commerce deal | Your Cash

CANBERRA, Australia (AP) –

French and Australian officials said Monday that France’s anger over a canceled submarine treaty will not bring down negotiations on a free trade agreement between Australia and the European Union.

France withdrew its ambassadors to the United States and Australia after President Joe Biden announced a new alliance with Australia and Britain last week that would supply an Australian fleet of at least eight nuclear submarines.

The deal resulted in a $ 90 billion ($ 66 billion) contract for the French state-owned Naval Group to build 12 conventional diesel-electric submarines for Australia. The money would have been spent over 35 years.

The French ambassador to Australia Jean-Pierre Thebault denied media reports that France had been lobbying the European Union not to sign the trade agreement with Australia that had been negotiated since 2018.

“Negotiations are continuing at this stage and there is a strong interest … for Australia in signing a free trade agreement with the EU,” Thebault told Australian Broadcasting Corp. from Paris.

Such a deal “has the potential to bring tremendous benefits to Australia,” added Thebault.

Australian Trade Minister Dan Tehan said he would be traveling to Paris within weeks for trade negotiations and was “very interested in contacting my French counterpart,” Franck Riester.

“My recent trip to Europe to discuss the EU Free Trade Agreement is a strong understanding that this is in the mutual interest of both Australia and Europe,” said Tehan, referring to a visit in April.

“I see no reason why these discussions should not continue,” added Tehan.

French President Emmanuel Macron will speak to Biden in the coming days on their first contact since the diplomatic crisis broke out.

Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison flew to the United States on Monday to meet with Biden and the leaders of India and Japan who make up the Quad Security Forum.

“The point here is always to ensure that the sovereign interests of Australia come first so that Australians can live here peacefully with the many others in our region, because that is what we want as a peaceful and free nation”, said Morrison before leaving Sydney.

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US body only supports COVID-19 boosters for high risk seniors

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RSS says federal cash will not be long-term answer for workers pay – Salisbury Put up

SALISBURY – Rowan-Salisbury Schools received an unprecedented amount of federal funding over the past year, but funding will only go so far as to keep the district’s staff competitive.

In total, the district raised $ 96.9 million in federal funds. The amount is spread across approximately $ 70.6 million in COVID-19 aid and a federal grant of $ 26.3 million granted in 2020 to advance renewal plans.

The district has some of the least competitive salaries for its employees when compared to comparable school districts. In June, Superintendent Tony Watlington collapsed where the district landed. Teachers, teaching assistants, caretakers and bus drivers are at the bottom of the lists in eight or nine districts.

The employees are roughly divided into certified and classified categories. Certified employees include faculties such as teachers and school principals. The classified employees include bus drivers, nutrition workers, maintenance and teacher assistants.

During the school committee meeting last week, Watlington briefly touched on the subject, noting that the district lags not only behind the more affluent surrounding districts in terms of pay for classified staff, but also behind comparable districts.

A bus driver for RSS starts at $ 12.07 per hour while a starting bus driver for Davidson County starts at $ 16.07 per hour. A salary study for classified employees is ongoing.

RSS chief finance officer Carol Herndon said it is rare for a salary study to return whose results show pay should stay the same. It is likely that the district will need to implement the study in a phased manner rather than implementing its recommendations in a single year, Herndon said.

Chief Operational Officer Anthony Vann said the district is struggling to recruit and hold classified positions under its umbrella. He said there were several reasons. Pay is one. Another is the high level of competition from private companies and other school districts for people with the skills RSS is looking for. The COVID-19 pandemic also contributes to this.

While demand fluctuates, Vann cited the example of around 50 vacancies in a workforce of 200 nutritionists. Central Office nutritionists and other RSS staff work in cafeteria lines in schools, much like staff who stand in as substitute teachers to make up for lengthy teacher absences.

Vann said he has lost several very skilled employees to the surrounding counties and sees companies in the city offering signing rewards.

“It makes it difficult to keep qualified staff unless you can compete with them,” said Vann.

Where the county will find the funding for the raise is still open, but there are a few options.

Why not the federal money?

Some of the federal aid money will go into the pockets of the faculty and staff, but it will not provide the county with a solution to long-term funding goals for the people who work there for two reasons: used to pay staff, and it will run out of money too .

The aid money is divided into three parts based on the primary and secondary school emergency fund. The district received $ 4.7 million from the CARES bill in the early days of the pandemic, which has already been issued. The remaining federal aid came in two installments, a package of $ 20.3 million in the final months of President Trump’s administration and $ 45.6 million under the US bailout plan passed earlier this year.

All three aid packages came with slightly different rules. The last two packages, which make up the bulk of the funding, were not issued. The use of the latter packages must pass a three-step test to either prevent, reduce or respond to COVID-19.

Currently, the district is trying to shift some of its funds to pay grants to employees taking on additional duties due to COVID-19, but the state has consistently declined districts to use the money to largely pay the salaries or bonuses. In the meantime, the $ 20.3 million must be spent by the end of September 2023 and the $ 45.6 million the following year.

Herndon said it was dangerous to try to fund permanent bonuses with volatile cash because the district could not sustain increases after the grants expired.

“Our goal is to find sustainable funding,” said Herndon, adding that the district is in the process of setting a price for the implementation of the wage study.

The district will spend more than $ 30 million in aid on repairing and upgrading HVAC systems in its schools. This will achieve a long-term capital goal by removing this funding from the capital requirement list of more than $ 200 million in the district’s facilities.

These expenses are acceptable as they improve the air quality in the buildings. When all work is complete, every school in the district will have HVAC systems with fresh air exchangers.

The $ 26.3 million grant is different. Its express purpose is to give teachers incentives to advance the work of the district on its special renewal status.

Earlier this year, the district announced its first grant incentive program, which will provide $ 585,000 in signing and retention bonuses at 13 schools. The district management has discussed creating an incentive payment with the subsidy at their schools in need, in order to also attract teachers.

Where does the district find money?

North Carolina is one of the few states that has left the funding of its public schools to the total grace of the state and local governments.

School systems in NC have no authority to collect taxes or generate income of their own accord, except through grants and private donations. The overwhelming majority of the district’s $ 207.6 million budget for this fiscal year comes from a combination of federal, state and local funds awarded directly by these institutions.

Most of the money comes from the state. One possibility is for the state to pass one of the proposed budgets currently circulating in the legislature. The budget could include either a $ 13 or $ 15 minimum wage for civil servants, with the state government assuming the state-funded portion of the increase. But a budget passed by the legislature that could come at the end of this month would also apply nationwide.

The second place to find funding is through the Rowan County Board of Commissioners. That year, the commissioners cut nearly $ 500,000 from current expenses for the district, while the local portion of salary and welfare expenses increased by $ 416,000. Local funding is $ 38.8 million.

“One of the things our county needs to sell to businesses and potential citizens is quality schools,” Herndon said, adding that it requires quality staff and competitive wages.

Herndon said RSS should meet with the commissioners in person to have a conversation so that district officials can understand the district’s needs. Letters sent to district officials each year may lack the emotion and passion behind the district’s work.

The district has introduced itself to commissioners in the past, but the COVID-19 pandemic has made this meeting difficult.

The county also provides almost all of the capital funding for the county. Small purchases of equipment such as furniture could be made, but local money is used to build schools.

The final way to find money is to exercise some financial discretion. Renewal gives the district more government funding flexibility than the average district, making it easier to keep track of the district’s spending.

Herndon cited as an example of buying curriculum materials and analyzing whether that product gives the district what it wants. If not, RSS could test competing products or free up that money for other initiatives.

“If we are serious about offering competitive wages to our employees, we need to look very carefully at what we are currently funding,” said Herndon.

Tesla Inventory Is Useless Cash. AI Day Will not Change That.

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A Tesla logo can be seen on a Tesla Model 3 car

Nicolas Asfouri / AFP via Getty Images

Tesla is eagerly awaited Artificial Intelligence Day might not be enough to tear the stock off the recent one Trade range. For this to happen, bullish investors may have to wait until early 2022.


Tesla

(Ticker: TSLA) The stock fell about 1.6% in pre-trading on Thursday, which appears to be another difficult day for the market.

S&P 500

and

Dow Jones industry average

Futures are down 0.8% and 0.9% respectively. The S&P lost 1.1% on Wednesday.

Including the pre-IPO moves, Tesla stock is down about 4% year-to-date and 14% in the past six months. For every positive thing for the stock – better than expected, for example Merits and strong shipments – there seems to be a competing negative. Some of the negative aspects can be blamed on the company while others are beyond its control.

Rising interest rates, which hurt highly-valued growth stocks more than others, dragged Tesla stock down 15% in February. The company has no control over prices. And the global automobile Semiconductor shortage tracked all car companies year-round, making car deliveries difficult, despite the 2020 Covid-induced recession demand has been higher than expected.

Tesla is also haunted by safety concerns about its autonomous driving capabilities. NHTSA opens an investigation in 11 accidents with Tesla driver assistance functions. And Senators Richard Blumenthal from Connecticut and Ed Markey from Massachusetts sent a letter to the FTC asking the agency to look into Tesla’s marketing of its autonomous driving capabilities. Those two things could suppress a positive stock reaction to Tesla’s Artificial Intelligence Day, which is slated to begin Thursday evening.

Big Tesla events don’t always result in a positive stock bang. To get started, Tesla hosted a Autonomy Day in April 2019 that detailed advances in its self-driving technology. The stock lost about 3% over the next six months while the S&P 500 rose about 3%.

Tesla shares also fell by hers in the two days Battery technology event in September 2020. Still, the stock rebounded roughly 85% from the post-battery day decline to year-end. That’s a big step, but so was Tesla added to the S&P 500 between the battery event and the end of 2020.

A catalyst like the inclusion in the S&P 500 is not in sight in 2021.

Bullish investors may have to wait for new capacity to come online in Texas and Berlin, Germany for the stock to climb back up. More capacity would give investors confidence that the company can ship around 1.3 million units in 2022, an increase of about 50% from the 860,000 expected deliveries in 2021.

New productions, which would be reflected in quarterly statistics, would also give investors confidence that Tesla has the battery and microchip supplies it needs to meet its lofty growth targets.

The plant in Texas will manufacture the Model Y and the Cybertruck. The Berlin plant will manufacture cars for the European market. The Berlin plant would relieve Tesla’s plant in Shanghai in order to concentrate more on the Chinese home market. Both plants are scheduled to go online towards the end of 2021. CEO Elon Musk recently said that Tesla’s German plant could soon be ready to build cars than October.

After the capacity limit, Tesla investors will want another catalyst. That’s likely a car that is smaller in size and lower in price than a Model 3. The timing and details of the next product are unknown, but the bulls expect something to be shared in 2022.

Write to allen.root@dowjones.com

Disney will not attend CinemaCon in-person as delta variant rages in Las Vegas

Signage outside the Caesars Palace Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada on Sunday, May 02, 2021.

Roger Kisby | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Walt Disney Executives won’t be traveling to Las Vegas next month to attend the National Association of Theater Owners’ CinemaCon.

The company quoted growing concern about the Covid-19 Delta variant why it skips the annual meeting of cinema owners and Hollywood studios at Caesars Palace, according to a report by The Hollywood Reporter. Disney will be showing one of its upcoming films rather than giving a staged presentation.

The news comes almost a week later NATO has publicly condemned Disney’s day-and-date disclosure from “Black Widow”. It’s unclear if this was a factor in the studio’s decision.

Disney representatives were not immediately available for comment.

For a decade, CinemaCon has been a top-class event for studios, theater owners and the media to meet, network and exchange upcoming content and cinema innovations. However, the pandemic sidelined last year’s conference and could still affect this year’s event.

As of Friday, the other major studios are continuing their efforts to host personal presentations, although fewer stars are expected to be present during the four-day convention.

While NATO requires attendees to provide evidence of vaccination or a negative Covid test within 48 hours of the event, many in the film industry have raised concerns about the recent surge in coronavirus cases. There are rumors that other studios that weren’t there before Disney left may follow suit.

Last week the White House declared southern Nevada, which includes the city of Las Vegas, a “sustainable hotspot” for the virus. This means the area has a high number of cases and there is a risk that healthcare resources are limited.

Los Angeles County officials have warned residents not to travel to Nevada and Mask requirement for indoor areas reintroduced for all vaccinated and unvaccinated. Las Vegas doesn’t require tourists to wear masks indoors, however.

Representatives from the National Association of Theater Owners declined to comment.

Pritzker Guarantees ‘Sturdy Marketing campaign,’ however Gained’t Say How A lot Cash He’ll Spend in 2022 – NBC Chicago

Illinois Governor JB Pritzker officially announced his re-election campaign this week, and although he spent more than $ 170 million during the 2018 race, it is unclear how far into his wallet he will be ready for that campaign grasp.

Pritzker, who will seek a second term as governor in next year’s elections, disagreed when asked by NBC 5’s Mary Ann Ahern how much he would spend on the 2022 race, saying his focus is solely on mileage ” robust “campaign trying to help Democrats win their race.

“My focus is on running a robust campaign and making sure we vote up and down the Democrats, not just myself,” he said. “We have constitutional officials running for re-election and people running for county executive seats, as well as a state representative and a state senate (so I’ll spend it) like I did in 2018 when we founded Blue Wave Illinois help everyone to drive the ticket up and down. “

According to Campaign Funding Records, during his 2018 bid to oust former Governor Bruce Rauner, Pritzker spent $ 171.5 million of his own money, which had also spent significant sums in his unsuccessful re-election campaign.

Pritzker has already drawn a Democratic challenger in the 2022 primary, as Beverly Miles, a Chicago nurse and U.S. Army veteran, announced a campaign for the nomination. At least three Republicans have already jumped into the field, including State Sen. Darren Bailey, who filed several legal challenges against Pritzker’s orders during the coronavirus pandemic, as well as businessman Gary Rabine and former State Sen. Paul Schimpf.

All three Republican candidates have spoken out loudly against Pritzker, with Bailey accusing the governor of “buying” the election.

“Today our failed Liberal Governor JB Pritzker announced that he would try to buy another election,” Bailey said in a press release. “Billionaires like Pritzker cannot relate to the struggles of working Illinois and families.”

Pritzker dismissed this criticism, saying that his election spending will be used solely to get his message across with the Democratic Party in Illinois.

“I’m just focusing on making sure we get the message out,” he said.

Pritzker also said he would continue to plan to help Democrats across the country during the upcoming midterm elections, but stressed that he did not speak to President Joe Biden about strategy or finances when the two met last week at the White House.

“I’ve always been a supporter of Democrats across the country,” he said.

Many worry Social Safety will run out of cash. Why that will not occur

Tara Moore | Getty Images

Most Americans are concerned about running out of Social Security during their lifetime, and those fears only got worse amid the Covid-19 pandemic.

That’s according to a survey by the financial services company Nationwide, which found 71% of adults feel this way. Fears about the benefit program were greatest among Generation X at 83% and Millennials at 77%, while only 61% of baby boomers agreed.

In addition, 47% of millennials said they believe they are “not getting a penny from the benefits they deserve”.

Many Americans – 59% – say they are more pessimistic now if the program is no longer supported after the pandemic outbreak. Meanwhile, 19% say Covid-19 caused them to rethink their plans to get benefits, with 11% planning to postpone filing and 9% planning to submit an earlier application.

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The trust funds that Social Security relies on to pay benefits have become scarce. The last official projection stated by the Social Security Administration that these funds could be used up in 2035, then 79% of the promised benefits would be payable. That estimate weighed all the effects of a pandemic.

Still, fears that the program would dry up and the performance reviews would end are unfounded, said Shai Akabas, director of economic policy at the bipartisan Policy Center.

“A lot of people hear the words bankrupt or bankrupt and automatically assume that the program will just go away,” Akabas said.

“The reality is that social security has been around for over 80 years and has more support than any other government function,” he said. “It’s very unlikely to go away anytime soon.”

While there is likely to be a solution, it takes Congress a long time to act. That can create uncertainty for Americans trying to plan their retirement, Akabas said.

The sooner the legislature acts, the less dramatic these changes can be. Higher taxes, benefit cuts, or a combination of both are among the adjustments they would likely consider.

“It’s not that serious or significant that the program will go away,” Akabas said. “But it’s also not a simple solution that we can wait for the last minute and just patch it overnight.”

Research suggests that benefit cuts would likely be less than 25% if they happen at all, said Joe Elsasser, founder and president of Covisum, a company that makes social security claims.

To calm these fears and enable people to plan, Covisum offers recently launched an online tool to show how cuts in social security benefits would affect a person’s monthly checks. It is noteworthy that the computer does not contain a scenario in which the advantages are completely eliminated.

“The probability that it will go to zero is as close as possible to zero,” said Elsasser.

Nationwide’s survey was conducted online from the Harris Poll between April 19 and May 7. It comprised 1,931 US adults.

NICK STROBEL: Moon will not dim July 4th fireworks | Leisure

Happy Independence Day! Tomorrow is Aphelion Day, when the Earth is furthest from the Sun at just over 94.5 million miles.

The extreme heat wave in the Pacific Northwest a few days ago clearly shows that the distance between the earth and the sun is not the reason for the seasons. Unfortunately, it is very likely that heat waves like the one we had last week will be more frequent.

We can handle very hot days here in the Central Valley because most of our homes and businesses have air conditioning (while electricity is still running), but most places in the Pacific Northwest don’t have air conditioning.

When my wife came home from a trip to the east late at night, she pointed to a bright star in the southeast and asked if it was Venus. Reasonable guess because the star is very bright, but Venus is now our “evening star”, visible deep in the west shortly after sunset.

The bright star we saw at almost 1 a.m. is Jupiter, the largest planet in the solar system, but because of its great distance from us, it appears weaker than Venus. A large brownish-yellow waning domed moon also appeared just above the horizon, one day from the third quarter.

The moon tonight will be a waning crescent so the moon won’t wash away any of the fireworks. The moon will be in the new moon phase on Friday and the first quarter will take place on July 17th. That said, there are some nice shots of a waxing crescent moon next to bright Venus in the evening next week.

July 11th will be especially great because Venus is right next to Mars (about a thumb’s breadth at arm’s length to the right of Mars). A little further to the right is a thin waxing crescent moon. All three may just barely fit in the same field of view of your binoculars.

The following night, July 12, Venus is only a little finger away from Mars, but the moon does not fit into the field of view of the binoculars.

Remain skeptical

My last trip included a night in Washington, DC, and one place we visited was the International Spy Museum. The various tour websites say it takes people an hour or two to get through, but it took my wife and I more than four hours just to do the first floor and we had to rush through the second floor to give us time Had to grab a quick bite to eat before heading to the airport. We read all the signs in museums.

One of the messages from the ISM was to draw reasonable conclusions from incomplete data and not know the full context of your data, a context that can radically change the meaning of the data.

It made me think of all the media hype surrounding the recent report from the Office of the Director of National Intelligence on UFOs (also referred to in the report as “unidentified aerial phenomena”). There have been over 140 sightings referenced in the report since 2004, all but one that the experts called in by the US government cannot explain.

This media noise is of course due to the fact that many people are very willing to make a big logical leap from the “unidentified flying object” to immediately identify it as an alien alien spaceship without considering more prosaic explanations.

The saying “extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence” means that the burden of proof rests on those who make claims about alien alien spaceships. You have to prove that the UFO cannot be anything but an alien alien spaceship. (For more information on this burden of proof, do a Google search for “Sagan Invisible Dragon”.)

People from all demographic categories have seen UFOs, but it is people from the United States who report the vast majority of sightings. The reasons most of the sightings reported are from those in the US is because of our very strong individualistic culture, which focuses on individual experience and expertise; our distrust of the federal government (often for very good reasons); and people here believe we live in a country with a technology that is superior to any other country. People in other countries who see a UFO are more likely to attribute it to new US war technology than to an alien spaceship. Context makes a big difference in how data is interpreted.

While as a skeptic of UFOs as extraterrestrial extraterrestrial spaceships I don’t have to disprove the hypothesis, I’ll point you to a nice one-sided guide to extraterrestrial UFOs published by Andrew Fraknoi bit.ly/ufoskeptic and Mick West’s investigation into the Navy videos of the strange phenomena that have featured in the media several times (see Fraknoi’s list for the links). Spoilers: The videos that are making the rounds in the media can be explained by definitely mundane and boring things, including camera optics artifacts.

Contributing columnist Nick Strobel is the director of the William M. Thomas Planetarium at Bakersfield College and the author of the award-winning website AstronomyNotes.com.

Aviation trade faces problem that inflow of federal grant cash will not have the ability to clear up, professional says

The grants aim to keep airport workers busy, get construction projects off the ground and help airports recover from a pandemic that is severely dampening air traffic. Airports can also use the money to grant rent relief for retail and concession companies in terminals.

Dan Akins, an aviation economist at consultancy Flightpath Economics, said MSP’s cut in grant money was more or less proportional to its share of air travel. He also said total funding might seem like much right now, but it’s based on March estimates.

“It seems big now because I think back then the light at the end of the tunnel was so small that it was hard to know when this was going to end,” Akins said. “And when it arrives it seems like we need less and less of it, but that is the price of a lengthy process to distribute money to airports and other commercial interests that have suffered during the pandemic.”

But Akins said the aviation industry’s biggest problem right now isn’t money – it is Shortage of staff.

“There aren’t enough people. There aren’t enough planes moving,” Akins said. “Demand has dropped so much that in the past few weeks you’ve seen Delta struggling, Americans struggling, Southwest struggling to keep their schedules because there isn’t enough manpower to provide the talent that they need Things to get an airplane from A to B. “

He said some airlines may have been too aggressive in firing highly specialized personnel like pilots and it will take a long time to regain that talent.

“Maybe they let too many pilots go with early retirement packages, as I think, as is the case with Delta, which seemed in a crisis when all airlines went over the waterfall,” Akins said. “‘Let’s get rid of the most expensive senior pilots and this will save us.” That was real short-term thinking. “

In other cases, Akins said, airlines are pulling managers off their officers and allowing them to get into day-to-day operations.

Right now, as airlines have been caught unprepared for a sudden surge in demand for air travel, air fares are rising, Akins said. And the generous refund policies that some companies put in place during the pandemic could also be dropped.