How a lot Mega Thousands and thousands, Powerball winners have paid in 2021 taxes

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As for the lottery, it’s been a good year for Uncle Sam so far.

The winners of the Powerball and Mega Millions jackpots – valued at a total of $ 2.9 billion – together paid approximately $ 515 million to the IRS in 2021. And that won’t be the end.

Whether jackpot winners choose the instant, discounted cash option (most do) or a three-decade pension, 24% is withheld for federal taxes. However, since the 37% maximum rate applies to income over $ 523,600 (sole taxpayer) and $ 628,300 (married couples filing together), you end up owing more.

There have been five Powerball jackpot winners so far in 2021 – and the pace of those wins could pick up, because a third weekly drawing will be added on Mondays from August 23.

Mega Millions has four winners this year (but the jackpot of $ 55 million won on June 8 remains unclaimed). For all prizes collected, the winners chose the cash option instead of the pension.

For the three Mega Millions jackpots claimed – which ranged from $ 96 million to $ 1 billion – the winners’ cash options totaled $ 1.2 billion. The federal 24% withholding tax totaled $ 288 million, bringing total revenue down to $ 912 million.

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Powerball winners have a total of $ 945.7 million in cash options, with jackpot amounts ranging from $ 23.2 million to $ 731.1 million. After the 24% federal withholding of $ 227 million, the winners were left with $ 718.7 million.

To illustrate, if the winners were unable to reduce their taxable income at all, another 13% – the difference between the 24% withheld and the top tax rate of 37% – would be due to Uncle Sam. Taken together, that would be another $ 278.9 million going into the federal treasury (a total of $ 793.9 million).

Of course, these lottery winnings generally only add a drop in the federal tax bucket. Income taxes paid by individuals are expected to represent approximately $ 1.9 trillion (50%) of the estimated $ 3.8 trillion in government revenue for fiscal 2021.

Local cash registers also benefit from big lottery winnings. State taxes ranging from zero to more than 8% would also be levied depending on where the ticket was purchased.

Like the state withholding tax rate on jackpot winnings, the amount withheld for state taxes can be less than you owe.

There are ways to reduce taxation on your profits, though not many. For 2021, due to a temporary change in federal regulations, charities can reduce their taxable income by making a qualified monetary donation of up to 100% of their adjusted gross income (this limit is expected to fall back to 60% in 2022).

Some lottery winners set up their own charitable foundation or a similar facility, such as a fund advised by donors, and donate part of their profits to it.

The Mega Millions jackpot is $ 179 million ($ 129.5 million cash option) for the Tuesday night drawing. Powerball’s jackpot is $ 211 million (cash option of $ 153.9 million) with the next drawing scheduled for Wednesday night.

Your chance of winning Powerball is 1 in 292 million. For Mega Millions, it’s 1 in 302 million.

2021 Memorial Well being Championship purse, winner’s share, prize cash payout

The 2021 Memorial Health Championship wallet is set at $ 600,000, with the winner’s share being $ 108,000 – the standard payout of 18 percent under the Web.com Tour Prize Money Distribution Table.

The Memorial Health Championship field is led by the likes of Adam Svensson, Curtis Thompson, and others.

The event will be played at the Panther Creek Country Club in Springfield, Illinois this year.

This event runs from Thursday to Sunday.

What else is at stake: Korn Ferry Tour points, OWGR points, exceptions

In addition to the money, there are important points, discounts and advantages for the field – especially for the tournament winner.

This is the 18th event of the year on the Korn Ferry Tour, with the delay in the 2021 calendar resulting in a combined 2020-2021 season that will eventually determine 50 PGA Tour tickets.

During the regular season, a player who wins the Korn Ferry Tour is awarded 500 points.

The top 25 players at the end of the 2020-2021 combined regular season will receive a PGA Tour ticket for the following season, and the order of priority at the fall events will be based on their combined points between the regular season and the Korn Ferry Tour final.

The winner of the Memorial Health Championship also receives 14 points in the official World Golf Ranking, thereby improving his world ranking.

Memorial Health Championship 2021 wallet, winners share, prize money paid out

  • 1. $ 108,000
  • 2. $ 54,000
  • 3. $ 36,000
  • 4. $ 27,000
  • 5. $ 22,800
  • 6. $ 20,700
  • 7. $ 19,200
  • 8. $ 17,700
  • 9. $ 16,500
  • 10. $ 15,300
  • 11. $ 14,190
  • 12. $ 13,200
  • 13. $ 12,300
  • 14. $ 11,400
  • 15 $ 10,800
  • 16. $ 10,200
  • 17. $ 9,600
  • 18. $ 9,000
  • 19. $ 8,400
  • 20. $ 7,800
  • 21st $ 7,290
  • 22nd $ 6,810
  • 23 $ 6,330
  • 24 $ 5,850
  • 25. $ 5,400
  • 26. $ 5,118
  • 27 $ 4,860
  • 28 $ 4,620
  • 29 $ 4,440
  • 30. $ 4,260
  • 31st $ 4,110
  • 32.3,990 $
  • 33. $ 3,870
  • 34.3750 $
  • 35.3630 $
  • 36.3510 $
  • 37. $ 3,390
  • 38.3,270 $
  • 39. $ 3,150
  • 40. $ 3,090
  • 41. $ 3,030
  • 42.2,970 $
  • 43.2,910 $
  • 44. $ 2,850
  • 45. $ 2,790
  • 46. ​​$ 2,730
  • 47. $ 2,700
  • 48.2670 $
  • 49.2640 $
  • 50.2610 $
  • 51. $ 2,580
  • 52. $ 2,556
  • 53. $ 2,544
  • 54. $ 2,532
  • 55. $ 2,520
  • 56.2508 $
  • 57.2496 $
  • 58. $ 2,484
  • 59. $ 2,472
  • 60.2460 $
  • 61. $ 2,448
  • 62.2436 $
  • 63. $ 2,424
  • 64. $ 2,412
  • 65.2400 $

Westminster Canine Present prize cash: How a lot do the winners make in 2021?

A trip to the Westminster Dog Show is an expensive undertaking.

Most show dogs cost at least $ 1,000. Owners will spend $ 250,000 on dog handling, grooming, advertising, and travel.

At that cost, owners could buy nearly 20,000 bags of most dog treats.

But how much could owners and their dogs make by winning the Westminster Dog Show, one of the most prestigious dog shows in the United States?

We break it down below:

Westminster Dog Show Wallet 2021

Dog shows can cost a lot to attend, but few make money for owners.

The Westminster Dog Show is one of those that doesn’t offer cash prizes for winners. Dogs get tummy scratches instead. Owners get Instagram clout.

How much does the winner of the Best in Show earn?

Do you want to make money by enrolling your dog on the Westminster Dog Show? It’s best to take a look at a few other options.

The winner will not receive any money from being named Best in Show. Neither will your owner. The American Kennel Club National Championship rewards $ 50,000 to the dogs who will take Best in Show home with them.

Who won the 2020 Westminster Dog Show?

Siba the standard poodle won the Westminster Dog Show last year. Siba is owned by Connie S. Unger and last year became the first standard poodle to be named Best in Show since 1991.

How much does it cost to register a dog for the Westminster Dog Show?

According to a Report from Yahoo! Finances, it costs owners $ 100 to enroll their dog on the Westminster Dog Show. However, the cost of making sure the dogs are ready for the show goes well beyond the entry fee.

How much is a ticket to the Westminster Dog Show?

In a normal year, ticket prices range from $ 22 for adults to $ 10 for children, up to $ 65 for a reserved seat in Madison Square Garden. However, due to coronavirus restrictions in New York, viewers will not be allowed to watch the Westminster Kennel Club announced, and instead of the MSG, it will be held outdoors at the Lyndhurst Estate in Tarrytown, New York. Only exhibitors receive tickets for the fair.

French Open prize cash: How a lot will the winners make in 2021? Purse, breakdown for area

As the temperatures rise, so does the action at the second tennis grand slam of the year. Roland Garros goes into week two with some of the biggest names still targeting the La Coupe des Mousquetaires (men) or the Suzanne Lenglen Cup (women).

In addition to winning two of the sport’s greatest trophies, the winner will also receive prize money. After a reduction in the prize money for the 2020 edition (when the tournament was held in the fall due to the pandemic), the 2021 wallet for Paris was also reduced by 10.53 percent.

What is the French Open wallet for 2021?

In 2020 the purse was $ 45.69 million and in 2021 it is fixed at $ 41.95 million. It’s a drop of $ 6,977,070 from last year’s wallet.

How much money does the winner get?

The masters in men’s and women’s singles will earn roughly $ 1.69 million everyone. Last year, Iga Swiatek became Poland’s first individual Grand Slam champion. In the men’s category, Rafael Nadal added his 13th win at Roland Garros and the 20th Grand Slam title of his career to his trophy case. The couple won $ 1.9 million each

The men’s and women’s doubles champions win $ 289,235 while the mixed doubles champions win $ 148,523

Breakdown of the prize money for the 2021 French Open

Although the total has shifted, if a player loses in qualifying or the first two rounds, they will receive the same amount as in last year’s tournament.

Men’s and women’s singles

place Prize money
winner $ 1.69 million
runner up $ 907,880
Semi-finalists $ 453,940
Quarter finalists $ 308,679
Round 4 $ 205,786
Round 3 $ 136,787
round 2 $ 101,683
Round 1 $ 72,630
Round 3 qualification $ 30,989
Round 2 qualification 2 $ 19,368
Round 1 qualification 1 $ 12,105

Men’s and women’s doubles

The prize money of the double winners has also suffered a blow this year, but again there is an increase in pay for those eliminated in the first rounds.

place Prize money
winner $ 289,235
Runner-up $ 170,577
Semi-finalists $ 100,339
Quarter finalists $ 59,024
Round 3 $ 34,720
round 2 $ 20,423
Round 1 $ 13,616

mixed double

In 2021, the winning couple will take home $ 148,523. First round to quarter finalists stagnated from year to year.

place Prize money Yes
winner $ 148,523
Runner-up $ 74,261
Semi-finalists $ 37,739
Quarter finalists $ 21,305
Round 16 $ 12,174

This is how it is broken down at every major tournament.

All figures in USD.

Australian Open prize money

Total: $ 61.95 million

Winner: $ 2.13 million
Runner-up: $ 1.16 million
Semi-finalist: $ 656,854.50
Quarter final game: $ 405,704.25
First round: $ 77,290

Wimbledon prize money

The championships were canceled in 2020 due to the pandemic, but here are the numbers for 2019.

Total: $ 51.88 million

Winner: $ 3.2 million
Runner-up: $ 1.6 million
Semi-finalist: $ 813,114.53
Quarter final game: $ 405,782.87
First round: $ 61,951.58

US Open Prize Money Open

Total: $ 53.4 million

Winner: $ 3 million
Runner-up: $ 1.5 million
Semi-finalists: $ 800,000
Quarter Finalists: $ 425,000
First round: $ 61,000

How a lot prize cash do the Champions League 2020-21 winners get?

Winning matches in the crown jewel of UEFA club competitions is a lucrative business

Champions League Financial rewards are an integral part of the season schedules of the world’s largest clubs.

Reaching the group stage of UEFA’s most important club competition is worth millions and can change the fate of a smaller club overnight.

The total price of course depends on how many games a team wins and how far it goes.

Editor favorites

How much prize money will the winners and runners-up of the 2020-21 competition win? goal brings you everything you need to know.

How much prize money will the 2020-21 Champions League winners receive?

It’s worth winning the Champions League final EUR 19 million (GBP 16 million / USD 23 million) and while he loses the final, the runner-up gets 15M EUR (13M GBP / 18M USD) to soften the blow.

However, the total prize money given to the winner is much more than that as the rewards are collected based on performance in each round.

position Prize money
winner € 19 million
runner up € 15 million
Semi-finalist € 12 million
Quarter final game € 10.5 million
Last 16 € 9.5 million
Group stage victory € 2.7 million
Group stage draw € 900,000
Qualification for the group stage € 15.25 million
Third qualifying round € 480,000
Second qualifying round € 380,000
First qualifying round € 280,000
Preliminary round € 230,000

Based on latest Numbers: A single group stage win is worth € 2.7m (£ 2.3m / $ 3m) and a draw is worth € 900,000 (£ 780,000 / $ 1m).

If a team starts from the group stage and wins every game in the group stage and then wins the entire competition, it gets a total € 82.45m (£ 71m / $ 100m) in the prize money.

Manchester city won five games in the group stage and drew one, which means they have already earned just over € 60million Chelsea won four group games and drew two, which means they have earned just under € 60million.

This figure is based on performance alone, but UEFA distributes more money to clubs based on the “market pool” broadcasting concept, where revenue is allocated based on the size of a television market.

The prize money for Champions League clubs is much higher than that for clubs participating in the Europa League.

The impact of the disruption caused by the Covid-19 pandemic, which affected two consecutive tournaments, is not yet clear, but it has been reported that prize money may be cut in the future.

For example, in October 2020 The times reported that UEFA prize money would be cut for five years after the pandemic. However, a 2021 report in L’Equipe suggested that the prize money would increase slightly.

You can read about the prize money of the Europa League 2020-21 here.

Winners introduced in Purple Beans and Rice Artwork Contest | Leisure/Life

The winners of the Red Beans and Rice Art Contest were announced by the competition sponsors, Cajun Country Rice, Camellia Brand and Savoie’s Foods.

In the Grade 5-8 Student Category, the winners are: First Place – Robyn Hays from Chalmette; second place – Sophia Kryszewski from Lafayette; third place – Kassidy Spears from Jonesville.

In the adult section (from 18 years) the winners are: First place – Lori Petrie from Opelousas; second place – Robin Miller of Baker; third place – Sherryl Guillory from Lafayette.

“We loved the opportunity to see so many people artistically interpret what this iconic Louisiana meal means to them. We warmly congratulate the winners and hope they can enjoy the prizes – which appropriately include red beans and rice – and some money to spend as they please, ”said Robert Trahan, co-owner of Falcon Rice Mill and Cajun Landreis in Crowley.

HMS scholar amongst winners of annual Younger Writers Contest | Options/Leisure

HUNTINGTON – Since 1984, the West Virginia Young Writers Contest has celebrated student writing in the state as a result of the commitment to write in all subjects and to publish, display, and celebrate student writing.

That year, Huntington Middle School’s Claire Johnson won second place in seventh and eighth grades for her play “Zombies,” which is listed below.

Teachers and administrators in each county encourage students to submit letters for assessment first at school and then at the county level.

Entries can be submitted on any topic and in any genre of prose: fiction, non-fiction, short stories, memoirs or essays.

Executives at Marshall University’s Central West Virginia Writing Project then judge entries based on ideas, organization, voice, choice of words, sentence flow, and conventions. The state winners were announced to the public on Friday, Young Writers Day, which took place practically in Microsoft teams.

First-placed county winners receive certificates and participate in workshops with published writers / moderators on West Virginia Young Writers Day. State winners in each of the six competition categories will receive checks for $ 100 for first place, $ 50 for second place, and $ 25 for third place.

“Zombies” by Claire Johnson

Alone a young girl rested and slept soundly. Not far from her bed was a broken clock, the screen broken and the plug unplugged. The girl lay for long hours and slept soundly, without the screaming of the little clock. In her little house everything was quiet, still without the voices and steps of her parents who had gone to work long before. The girl didn’t like it when her parents left; she felt alone.

Have a chat, your parents would say. But she knew what kind of entertainment her parents meant. The kind that started with a screen and ended in despair, detachment and a throbbing headache. She would much rather explore, read, and create. Boredom was a more watchful parent than those who fathered her – boredom at least taught her lessons and sparked her creativity. Why can’t you be like the other kids? her parents would ask. They are all very happy with their devices. But the little girl didn’t want to be like the other children. She didn’t want to be a zombie.

She stumbled down the stairs and rubbed the sleep from her eyes. Her house was perfect: every finish was pristine, not a single thing out of place, as if no one lived in the house at all – which she sometimes took to be true. She took her coat off the hanger and stepped outside into the crisp autumn air. She enjoyed the outdoors, much to her parents’ displeasure. They will chase Mud through the house, they would scold. I know you like to go outside, but why not just watch some nature documentary instead? The little girl did not understand her parents, nor did they understand them.

She looked at the trees that lined her meadow. She enjoyed the park, but it always hurt to see it. Every person who sits on the benches is fascinated by the virtual life into which they have plunged desperately. She would watch from a distance and notice small details. She was very good at it and noticed details. Her parents called it a nuisance, annoyed that she paid more attention to other people than to her screen. Your device teaches you things that are far more important than observation.

The little girl disagreed.

She walked along the stream and watched the ducks chase each other in circles, longing for the ignorant bliss that she was sure they felt. She walked down the street and entered a small cafe. The little girl always enjoyed the little café and drank her tea from mini tea cups. While she waited in line, she watched the people in front of her. The one in front appeared to have headphones on and moved its head in a bass beat that was so easy to hear for someone who listened closely. No one but the little girl seemed to be listening closely, too intrigued by her ex’s new girlfriend, or at least the girl who was sitting at a nearby table. She scrolled and scrolled, and her eyes narrowed every time her ex showed up in her feed. The little girl looked away. She knew when she was invading someone’s privacy.

Finally, when it was her turn, she went to the cash register. She just pointed at the menu, her finger barely reaching across the counter for the cashier to see. He nodded and turned his gaze back to the computer screen in front of him.

After a few moments, a young looking boy in an apron presented her mini teacup and the little girl took a seat in the back. She liked the back of the little cafe – it gave her a clear view of everyone in it. When she was done, she skipped the door she came in and gave a rare smile to a woman on her way. The woman was too busy with her screen to notice.

The little girl was walking the inner streets of the city, her least favorite place. The sidewalks were full of people, but somehow it was the place where she felt most lonely. Everyone was walking back and forth, their heads buried in their screens. The little girl was often tossed around by a distracted pedestrian who was too focused on his own virtual life to notice a lonely child. That was what bothered her the most, the reason why she was most tempted to pick up her screen and pretend to enjoy the desperation and headache it brought with it: the feeling of belonging, the feeling of acceptance in a society that would otherwise never accept it. These thoughts are way too great for someone your age, their parents would complain. The little girl agreed.

She wandered the city alone, tears marking the agony she felt – alone, calm, suffocated by the walking zombies that surrounded her. Slaves to their own devices.

Nomadland leads winners at 2021 Movie Unbiased Spirit Awards | Leisure

‘Nomadland’ was the big winner of the Film Independent Spirit Awards 2021 and won four awards on Thursday (22.40.21).

The drama beat competition from “First Cow”, “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom”, “Minari” and “Never Seldom Sometimes Always” to win the prestigious “Best Feature Film” award, while filmmaker Chloe Zhao was best Director was honored, which further strengthened her predictions. I’ll get the same award at the Oscars this weekend.

The film was also awarded Best Editing and Best Cinematography.

Riz Ahmed triumphed in a strong category and took on the best male lead role for “Sound of Metal” ahead of Steven Yeun (“Minari”), Adarsh ​​Gourav (“The White Tiger”), Rob Morgan (“Bull”) and the late Chadwick Boseman (‘Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom’) and in his acceptance speech he encouraged those whose lives were turned upside down due to the coronavirus pandemic.

He said, “The Sound of Metal is about how a health crisis can throw your life off course, and on the other hand there can be a lot of discomfort but also clarity. And for anyone who has gone through some upheaval this year, me.” wish you peace on the other side. “

Carey Mulligan, the star of the promising young woman, dedicated her victory to Helen McCrory as best female lead after her death on April 16 after a secret battle with cancer.

She said, “I just want to dedicate this award to a true independent spirit – an actress that I looked up to and will continue to look up to for the rest of my career, Helen McCrory. Thanks to her for all she has given us.”

The 35-year-old actress was shortlisted for the award alongside Nicole Beharie (‘Miss Juneteenth’), Viola Davis (‘Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom’).

Sidney Flanigan (“Never Seldom, Sometimes Always”), Julia Garner (“The Assistant”) and Frances McDormand (“Nomadland”).

For the first time in history, the event also recognized television and history performance, with “I May Destroy You” winning both Best New Scripted Series and Best Ensemble Cast In A New Scripted Series.

The “unorthodox” stars Amit Rahav and Shira Haas each won best male and best female performance in a new script series.

“Never seldom, sometimes always” had given the nominations with seven nods, but could not win in any category.

2021 Film Independent Spirit Awards selected list of winners:

Best feature:

“Nomadland”

Best first feature:

“Sound Of Metal”

Best Director:

Chloé Zhao, “Nomadland”

Best script:

“Promising young woman”

Best first script:

Andy Siara, “Palm Springs”

John Cassavetes Award:

‘Residue’

Best male lead:

Riz Ahmed, “Sound of Metal”

Best female lead:

Carey Mulligan, “Promising Young Woman”

Best Supporting Man:

Paul Raci, “Sound of Metal”

Best supportive woman:

Yuh-Jung Youn, ‘Minari’

Best camera:

Joshua James Richards, “Nomad Land”

Best processing:

Chloé Zhao, “Nomadland”

Robert Altman Award:

“One night in Miami”

Producer price:

Gerry Kim

Someone to see award:

Ekwa Msangi, “Farewell Cupid”

Best New Script Series:

“I can destroy you”

Best Female Performance in a New Screenplay Series:

Shira Haas, “unorthodox”

Best Male Performance in a New Screenplay Series:

Amit Rahav, “unorthodox”

Best Ensemble in a New Screenplay Series:

“I can destroy you”

Would you guess all of your cash on Vikings being winners or losers in 2021?

Kirk Cousins has never finished with a .500 record in any season as a starter, even if he has flirted with it and been properly tagged with the perception that his teams generally finish right around that mark.

He will be hard-pressed to do it in 2021, owing more to a new scheduling quirk than his own acumen. The NFL is now a 17-game affair, and in order to go .500 this season, Cousins’ Vikings would need to finish 8-8-1 — not out of the question since Cousins has improbably finished 8-7-1 twice in his career (once each for Washington and Minnesota), but still far less likely than when the NFL played an even number of games like every other rational league everywhere.

But there is one place you can find a perfectly even split on the 2021 Vikings: The William Hill sports book, which released its over/under win total lines for all 32 NFL teams a couple days ago.

Only one NFL team opened with an over-under of 8.5. Yes, it’s your Vikings.

I talked about that at the end of Tuesday’s Daily Delivery podcast, with the caveat (of course) being that you should only use this a thought exercise if sports betting is not permitted where you live.

If you don’t see the podcast player, click here to listen.

In a 17-game season, that means that the wagering-inclined Vikings fan has a simple question to ask herself or himself: Are the Vikings going to finish with a winning record (9-8 or better) or a losing record (8-9 or worse)?

If you had to wager, say, your May rent or mortgage payment on one of those two outcomes, which would you pick?

Maybe you would make a slightly more informed decision once they hold next week’s draft and/or (hopefully) add more to the offensive line. Maybe the order of their schedule would even matter. But not much should fundamentally change from now until September.

These are their 17 games — eight at home, nine on the road, the fifth-toughest schedule overall in terms of opponent 2020 winning percentage:

Home:Chicago Bears, Detroit Lions, Green Bay Packers, Los Angeles Rams, Seattle Seahawks, Cleveland Browns, Pittsburgh Steelers, Dallas Cowboys

Road:Chicago Bears, Detroit Lions, Green Bay Packers, Arizona Cardinals, San Francisco 49ers, Baltimore Ravens, Cincinnati Bengals, Carolina Panthers, Los Angeles Chargers.

That’s … tough. The defense should be better, but there are no guarantees. The offense could take a step back. And the special teams are as unsettled as ever.

Do you go with your general Vikings pessimism or Mike Zimmer’s odd year magic?

I have to admit, I was surprised when I put this to a Twitter poll. More than 70% of you (at least as of 8 a.m. Tuesday) would take the over — meaning seven out of every 10 respondents think the Vikings will have a winning season in 2021.

I guess this is what I would say: If I was a Vikings fan just making a small wager for fun in order to stay interested in the season, I’d bet the over — 9 wins, a winning record, maybe a trip to the playoffs and an extension of the Cousins/Zimmer/Rick Spielman era.

If I had to bet a serious amount of money? Give me the under, because I’m worried that it will all fall apart against some pretty good teams.

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GLAAD Media Awards 2021: The winners listing | Leisure

“Uncle Frank” (Amazon Studios)

Outstanding Limited or Anthology Series

“I can destroy you” (HBO)

Excellent reality program

Excellent child programming

“The Not Too Late Show With Elmo” (HBO Max)

Excellent child and family programming

[TIE]: “Day One” (Hulu) and “She-Ra & The Princesses of Power” (DreamWorks Animation / Netflix)

Sam Smith, “Love Goes” (Capitol)

Outstanding groundbreaking music artist

CHIKA, “Industrial Games” (Warner Records)

[Tie]: Tell me why (DONTNOD Entertainment & Xbox Game Studios) and

The Last Of Us Part II (Naughty Dog & Sony Interactive Entertainment)

“Empyre, Lords of Empyre: Kaiser Hulkling, Empyre: Aftermath Avengers” by Al Ewing, Dan Slott, Chip Zdarsky, Anthony Oliveira, Valerio Schiti, Manuel Garcia, Cam Smith, Marte Gracia, Triona Farrell, Joe Caramagna, Ariana Maher, Travis Lanham (Marvel Comics)