The place’s The Cash? Hundreds of thousands of Illinois Rental Help {Dollars} Nonetheless Ready To Be Disbursed – NBC Chicago

It’s said to be a lifeline: more than $ 1 billion in federal rental and relief funds that Congress has earmarked for Americans hardest hit by the pandemic.

Illinois received a decent chunk of that funding: more than $ 800 million.

But NBC 5 Responds records show that much of the government’s funds are still in an account – not yet paid off – while the cloud of uncertainty about how long eviction moratoriums will last looms over fearful tenants.

Housing lawyers and civil servants are preparing for a potential flurry of housing problems.

In a recent US Census Household Pulse Survey, more than 109,000 Illinois residents responded that they were likely to face eviction, and just over 19,000 said the same thing about foreclosing their homes.

It is for this reason that the emergent CARES Act of Congressional Emergency Rent Assistance Program stands ready to save many from homelessness.

The problem, however, is the process of getting the money into the hands of those who need it most.

NBC 5 Responds examined the latest numbers for two Illinois government agencies that currently hold the bulk of the rental subsidy funds: the Illinois Housing Development Authority (IHDA) and the Department of Human Services (IDHS).

IHDA’s numbers show that it distributed about 46 percent of the $ 504 million it was supposed to deliver to renters and landlords. To date, the Office has received more than 96,000 requests for assistance through its online portal.

IDHS has taken a different approach to delivering the funds allocated to it.

The IDHS records show that through a network of community providers across the state, it has paid out approximately 11 percent of the $ 117 million to more than 4,000 applicants since April.

State officials and attorneys said many people in Illinois find themselves in a scenario they have never experienced before: facing the maze of procedures and trials in eviction courts as they seek both financial and legal assistance in order to to keep them afloat. NBC 5 replies.

Housing officials told NBC 5 that these findings highlighted the need for a recent extension of the state’s eviction moratorium (to learn more Click here). They stated that more time is needed to get rental assistance into the hands of those who need it most.

In a virtual interview, IDHS Secretary Grace Hou agreed to extend the state moratorium, stressing that the programs are working as quickly as possible while ensuring that funds are distributed responsibly.

“We have a very compassionate yet cautious science-based approach,” Hou said. “We don’t want our program to be questioned negatively in the further course.”

Hou said IHDA’s Rental Assistance Program is designed to take thousands of applications across the state virtually through an online portal and deliver funds directly to tenants and landlords.

But the IDHS plan is different.

“We know this one-size-fits-all isn’t for all renters and landlords looking for help,” said Hou.

The IDHS rent subsidy distribution plan, Hou explained, is a “personal floor game”; played by a team of grassroots, immigration and faith organizations who work with the agency to help communities who are most in need and who are afraid to turn to the government for help.

To view a list of IDHS rental assistance providers in your area, Click here.

“People may be familiar with the programs, but in some communities there may be a fear of actually accessing some of these programs,” Hou said, adding that some families need more than just rental assistance.

“We work with families who may have a number of other challenges,” said Hou. “The programs are designed to work hand in hand to address different households in different situations.”

The call for more rental assistance, delivered faster, isn’t unique to Illinois. This week, the Treasury Department confirmed that the bulk of the country’s earmarked funds – 89% – is still in the pipeline.

If state and local authorities do not distribute rental support funds by September 30, the Treasury Department has the right to redistribute these funds to areas of continuing need.

But a local silver lining: federal agencies said Illinois was one of the best-improved programs, with its spike from spending in May to more than $ 96 million the following month.

Hou said she understood the sense of urgency, but state officials also need to balance it with thoughtful and strategic and deliberate processes.

While the IHDA application portal is temporarily closed for renters or landlords seeking help with renting out, Hou said it will reopen in the coming weeks.

In the meantime, tenants and landlords can apply for assistance through the IDHS provider network.

For more information on rentals and legal resources, NBC has 5 Responds a complete guide here.

The place’s The Cash: The way to defend your cellphone from hackers

Your phone is an extension of your online life. Here are three ways to ensure that your devices are protected from hackers.

CHARLOTTE, NC – With the recent news of hacked pipelines and large corporations paying ransom to get their files back, you might be wondering how secure your devices are.

It has become much more than just a mobile phone. In reality, our phones are an extension of our online life. We rely on it, monitor the financial assets on it, and may even keep password lists on a variety of websites.

First, who is vulnerable? The answer is everyone. Will you know if you have been hacked or if spyware has been installed on your phone? Probably not, which is why this information is so important.

Know that spyware can collect all of your information like passwords, contacts, photos, videos and documents that you have stored on your phone or computer.

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So how can you make sure your phone is safe? Here are three things you can do to make sure your phone and the information on it are locked tight.

  1. Make sure your automatic updates are turned on, you can do this in the settings. The newer the device, the better the security. Big Tech automatically sends updates and patches to keep up with current threats, so make sure this is enabled.
  2. Don’t use the same password for everything. 13% of respondents in a Harris survey use the same password for everything and 52% use the same passwords for multiple accounts. So change them and make them stronger. Phrases that are unique to you are powerful and should be easier to remember. Avoid the urge to use names of pets, children, and birthdays and anniversaries. Most of this information is available on Facebook. Lock these accounts, don’t keep them public. It’s shocking how many people have open sides that anyone can see.
  3. Activate two-factor authentication. When you enter your password, a code will be sent to your phone or email. Experts say this is a great security measure.

Finally, don’t click on weird emails or messages from long lost friends that suddenly come out of the blue with a link to Photos or some other link to click. Also be careful with the note “Click here to get the bargain coupon”. It can be displayed in any store. Before you click, google the ad to see if it’s real, but don’t just blindly click.

We don’t want to admit it, but human error and password laziness are the two things that make us most vulnerable.

WCNC Charlotte always asks “where’s the money?” If you need help, contact the Defenders team via email money@wcnc.com.

Contact Bill McGinty at bmcginty@wcnc.com and follow him on Facebook.

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The place’s Tampa Bay’s COVID aid cash being spent?

It has been almost four months since the American bailout plan was passed. Eight cities in the Tampa Bay area will receive direct funding.

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. – In March, President Joe Biden signed a bill worth $ 1.9 trillion COVID relief plan.

Part of that plan includes that Child tax deduction This means that 39 million families will be entitled to monthly child payments as of July 15.

The help package called American rescue plan Billions of dollars pumped into the state of Florida.

When the plan was passed, 10 Tampa Bay received the state and local allotment estimate spreadsheet developed by the House Oversight & Reform Committee.

CONNECTED: American Bailout Plan: Who’s Got What in Tampa Bay?

State of Florida: The Sunshine State should get $ 17.6 billion. Of this, $ 10 billion will remain in Tallahassee and will be distributed according to state lawmakers’ decisions. The remaining $ 7 billion will be split between the state’s county and city governments.

Of that $ 10 billion goes to the county governments, here is the estimated breakdown in Tampa Bay:

Hillsborough: $ 285.48 million

Pinella: $ 189.09 million

Sarasota: $ 84.12 million

A Hillsborough County spokesman confirmed they received half of their reported stake of $ 142,956,264 from the U.S. Treasury Department on May 19.

The county expects to receive the remainder of the money from the American Rescue Plan (ARP) in May 2022.

Michelle Van Dyke, a Hillsborough spokeswoman, said via email: “Our executive team is developing an ARP investment plan that sets out the intended and allowable allocations in accordance with the Guiding Principles released by the BOCC on the 7th we will present our ARP investment plan to BOCC at the end of August. “

A Pinellas County spokesman said it was still working on investment plans and declined to provide details at the time.

Eight cities The Tampa Bay area will also receive direct funding from the stimulus package. Here is the breakdown:

St. Petersburg: $ 46.66 million

Lakeland: $ 24.38 million

Clear water: $ 20.87 million

Sarasota: $ 10.92 million

Bradenton: $ 10.90 million

Pinellas Park: $ 9.98 million

Now, nearly four months after the bill was passed, 10 Tampa Bay is asking questions about how money is being spent in our area.

A spokesman for the city of St. Petersburg confirmed that the leaders received about half of their share, about $ 22.5 million. You will receive the second half in 2022.

Mayor Rick Kriseman said the money is in the bank until they give the public time to express opinions on where that money should be spent.

“We’re really interested in getting a taste of the community, you know, is resilience and sustainability the most important thing? Is health equity the most important thing? Is transportation the most important thing,” said Kriseman.

Kriseman and the city council have developed a series of community feedback workshops to help prioritize which areas of impact will receive funding.

Community members can contribute to the following eight eligible areas of impact:

  1. Infrastructure
  2. Affordability of housing
  3. health equality
  4. economic development
  5. leisure offers
  6. public safety
  7. transport
  8. Resilience & sustainability

The three public workshops include presentations that outline the state of play for each area of ​​impact, followed by breakout sessions where community members can provide feedback.

Dates / locations for workshops are:

– Monday, July 26th, 6-8pm – Enoch Davis Center (1111 18th Ave. S.)

Tuesday, July 27th, 6-8pm – JW Cate Rec Center (5801 22nd Ave. N.)

– Wednesday, July 28th, 6-8pm – Willis S. Johns Rec Center (6635 Dr. MLK Jr. St. N.)

Another great aspect of the American rescue plan is about supporting American schools. The package labeled $ 130 billion for K12 education. Tampa Bay school districts should receive:

Hillsborough: $ 500 million

So far, spokesmen for the Pinellas and Polk districts have said they have not yet received funding.

CONNECTED: Federal judge blocks aid to minority farmers after Florida farmer complains
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The place’s the cash going? Salinas to obtain greater than $50 million in COVID aid

The city of Salinas will receive $ 50,459,386 from the recently passed COVID-19 aid package worth $ 1.9 trillion. That’s more than half of the $ 86 million that each city in Monterey County receives in total. Action News 8 asked Steve Carrigan, Salinas City Manager, “Where is the money going?” “We’re 20 years behind on sidewalks. One of the things that hit all seven councilors right away was that we can fix the sidewalks,” Carrigan said, another infrastructure problem highlighted during the pandemic and now at the center of attention City is bridging the digital divide. “I like the idea of ​​looking at broadband infrastructure and bringing the internet to all four corners of Salinas,” said Carrigan. Carrigan said before a decision is made they still have to determine how exactly the money can be spent. “It’s not always crystal clear with the government. So we’re asking where exactly we can spend this money,” said Carrigan. At this point, Carrigan says he knows for a fact that the money can be used on infrastructure projects, efforts to contain the spread of Covid-19 and help recover lost revenue. Carrigan said when it comes to lost revenue during the Salinas pandemic, “We know that the number is 14 million, but I could easily say 75-100 million.” Carrigan says it’s difficult to quantify how much the city is after Cancellation of rodeo and youth sporting events like football tournaments throughout the year. “There are temporary occupancy taxes. There are hotel evenings, people eat in restaurants, they buy gasoline. That’s thousands of people who come into town who don’t came into town, “said Carrigan. The city council will meet on March 30th to begin the public discussion of spending over $ 50 million and they will have until December 31st, 2024 to spend it all. “For three and a half years some people think it’s a long time, in government it’s very, very fast,” said Carrigan. “I can tell you enough, this is historical, this is a big deal, and we’re going to spend it wisely here in the City of Saltpans.”

The city of Salinas will receive $ 50,459,386 from the recently passed COVID-19 aid package worth $ 1.9 trillion.

It represents more than half of the $ 86 million that each Monterey County city receives as a whole. Action News 8 asked Salinas City Manager Steve Carrigan, “Where is the money going?”

“We’re 20 years behind on sidewalks. One of the things that came up with all seven councilors immediately was that we can fix the sidewalks,” Carrigan said.

Another infrastructure issue highlighted during the pandemic and now at the heart of the city is bridging the digital divide.

“I really like the idea of ​​looking at broadband infrastructure and bringing the internet to all four corners of Salinas,” said Carrigan.

Carrigan said before a decision is made they still have to determine how exactly the money can be spent.

“It’s not always clear with the government. So we’re asking where exactly we can spend this money,” said Carrigan.

At this point, Carrigan says he knows for a fact that the money can be used on infrastructure projects, efforts to contain the spread of Covid-19 and help recover lost revenue.

Carrigan said when it comes to lost revenue during the Salinas pandemic, “We know the number is 14 million, but I could easily say 75-100 million.”

Carrigan says it’s difficult to quantify how much the city lost after the cancellation of rodeo and youth sporting events like soccer tournaments during the year.

“There are temporary property taxes, there are hotel stays, people eat in restaurants, they buy gasoline. Thousands of people who come into town who have not come into town,” said Carrigan.

The city council will meet on March 30th to begin the public discussion on how to spend the more than $ 50 million, and they will have until December 31st, 2024 to spend it all.

“For three and a half years some people think it’s a long time, in government it’s very, very fast,” said Carrigan. “I can tell you enough, this is historical, this is a big deal, and we will spend it wisely here in the city of salt flats.”