Fb pledges to revive extra water than it makes use of by 2030

Mark Zuckerberg, Chairman of Facebook, speaks on the second day of the 56th Munich Security Conference. The fight against propaganda campaigns and other attempts at manipulation costs Facebook billions every year.

Tobias Hase | Image Alliance | Getty Images

Facebook announced on Thursday plans to return more water than it uses by 2030, the company’s latest initiative against climate change.

The company primarily uses water to cool the computer banks that run in its data centers. In 2020, according to Facebook, it removed 3.7 million cubic meters of water – a volume equivalent to nearly 1,500 Olympic-sized swimming pools – or a total consumption of 2.2 million cubic meters.

Facebook intends to focus its efforts on regions that utilize local water resources, but it is also exploring high-risk areas that are facing the greatest challenges in terms of their water supply, said Sylvia Lee, Facebook’s water sustainability director.

“When you look at the biggest effects of climate change – some of the really big ones like forest fires, droughts, floods – everything is ultimately related to water,” Lee said in an interview.

Extreme weather events have become increasingly common around the world, from forest fires in Facebook’s home state of California to historic storms and record heat waves.

The United Nations Climate Panel launched one earlier this month bad report calls for immediate action. The agency warned that limiting global warming to almost 1.5 degrees Celsius or even 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels will be “unattainable” in the next two decades without reducing greenhouse gas emissions quickly and on a large scale. The report states that heat extremes at 2 degrees Celsius would often reach critical tolerance levels for agriculture and health.

Big tech companies, which use a lot of energy in their data centers and are growing much faster than the overall economy, are announcing their plans.

Apple called Wednesday It supports a clean energy standard proposed by the Biden government to eliminate greenhouse gases from power plants by 2035. Facebook rival Snap announced its own climate strategy in March to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and buy back 100% renewable energy. In 2019, Amazons Jeff Bezos revealed “Climate Promise”, and said he anticipates 80% of the company’s energy consumption will come from renewable sources by 2024.

Outside the tech industry, companies are like 3M and Pespi made a similar pledge to protect water supplies. 3M joined the Water Resilience Coalition earlier this month and is committed to using its resources to improve water supplies. Pepsi promised earlier this month to replenish more water than it uses by 2030.

Facebook has previously launched water restoration projects in New Mexico, Arizona, Texas, Utah, Oregon, and California. This includes funding to support the Colorado River Indian Tribes System Conversation Project to maintain and stabilize the water levels in Lake Mead, Arizona. The company is also helping plant 70,000 trees in California to restore areas burned by forest fires in 2018.

Going forward, Facebook announced that it would expand its water restoration efforts in Ireland, Singapore, India, the UK and Mexico.

“When we focus on water restoration, we focus on projects that go into the same watershed we’re involved in,” said Lee.

The company plans to review its water restoration efforts through LimnoTech, a sustainability consultancy. Facebook will keep the public informed of its efforts annually Sustainability reports.

Earlier this year, Facebook announced that it had been achieved Net zero emissions and that’s it now 100% dependent on renewable energies. In September 2020, the company set itself the goal of becoming net zero throughout the supply chain by 2030.

SEE: Facebook’s co-creator of its Diem on Digital Wallet Push cryptocurrency

Rain barrels assist get monetary savings, preserve water; right here’s how New Bedford residents can get one at a reduction

NEW BEDFORD, Massachusetts (WPRI) – If you live in New Bedford and want to save some money and help the environment, a Boston-based company is a convenient way to do it.

The great American rain Barrel company has dealt with the measure. Department of Environmental Protection teamed up to provide rainwater collection barrels at a discounted price of $ 79.

The aim is to help cities and communities to save water and at the same time reduce costs.

The kegs are the same 60 gallon size but may vary slightly in appearance due to manufacturing in different countries, according to the company.

TUTORIALS: How to Install and Use a Rain Barrel

New Bedford residents have until Thursday, September 2, to order kegs, which can be picked up at the New Bedford Department of Public Infrastructure’s office on Shawmut Avenue from 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. on Saturday, September 11th

The company says it has been repurposing shipping barrels and turning them into rain barrels since 1988.

LEARN MORE: New Bedford rain barrel program

Feds will ration water from Colorado River amid historic drought

The US government on Monday declared the first water shortage in Lake Mead, the largest reservoir in the country by volume, after the water level fell to a record low amid a decades-long drought.

The water cuts will go into effect for Arizona, Nevada and Mexico in January, the Bureau of Reclamation said on Monday. Arizona will be hardest hit, with roughly 18% of the state’s annual allotment cut.

The Colorado River provides water and electricity to more than 40 million people in the west, while also providing approximately 2.5 million acres of farmland. Among the cities it serves is Phoenix, which according to the US newspaper has been the fastest growing city in the US for the past decade Arizona Republic, and is now the fifth largest city in the country.

Earlier this summer, reservoirs in the Colorado River Basin fell to their lowest level on record after 22 consecutive years of drought. In just five years, Lake Mead and Lake Powell have lost 50% of their capacity.

Officials believe Lake Mead’s water level is just below 1,066 feet on Jan. 1, which is about nine feet below the trigger level of 1,075 feet.

At a press conference following the announcement, officials said “additional action is likely to be required in the near future” as the situation worsens. More than 98% of the western US is currently in drought, 64% in extreme drought conditions.

“We are seeing the effects of climate change in the Colorado River Basin through prolonged drought, temperature extremes, widespread forest fires, and in some places floods and landslides, and now it is time to take action to respond,” said Tanya Trujillo. Deputy Secretary for Water and Science in the Ministry of the Interior.

Lake Mead was created through the construction of the Hoover Dam and extends over more than 750 miles of coastline.

Legal professionals for victims in Flint water lawsuit make case for extra money in settlement

FLINT, me. – On Monday, lawyers for Flint residents were given the opportunity to bring their case that the $ 650 million settlement with the state is simply not enough because of the water crisis.

A total of 50,000 people have signed up to receive a stake, and many of them are unsatisfied with a variety of issues, including $ 200 million in legal fees.

Flint, is still grappling with the effects of the water crisis. Now the fight for money. From Monday, the victims’ lawyers pleaded for more money in court. Soon the victims will tell their own stories.

Here’s a look at the numbers.

  • 50,000+ registered

  • Money mostly for kids, businesses hit by the lead water crisis

  • Comparative deal for $ 640 million

  • Lawyers charge 32% legal fees

  • Balance about $ 435 million

When the deal was first announced, the governor was optimistic.

“It is our duty to make the best offer to Flint’s children and families,” said Michigan’s Governor Gretchen Whitmer.

But since then, some, including Flint’s former mayor, have been saying the number should be closer to 1 billion.

“It’s just not enough for those who have suffered,” said former Flint Mayor Karen Weaver.

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Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel released the statement on Monday.

“Our state owes the people of Flint a path to healing, not a lengthy legal back-and-forth. I continue to hope that this agreement will be finally approved to get us all on this path. We recognize that no amount of money will ever remove the damage done, but this comparison should serve as a reminder of our commitment to the people of Flint, the city and their future, ”said Nessel.

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Saginaw residents want cash to keep away from water shutoffs. United Means has $12M to present them. Few have inquired.

CORRECTION: An earlier version of this report contained an incorrect dollar amount in relation to total federal aid available to United Way of Saginaw County. The correct amount is $ 12 million. The correct sum is now reflected in history.

SAGINAW, MI – On Tuesday, Audra Davis’ challenge was to alert hundreds of Saginaw residents at risk of losing water utilities that their nonprofit has $ 3.2 million in federal aid that theirs solve the predicament.

On Wednesday morning, the challenge for the President of the United Way of Saginaw County grew:

At the time, her nonprofit had $ 12 million in federal aid that could help resolve these predicaments.

“I wasn’t expecting that,” said Davis. “I opened my e-mail for this message in the morning.”

This news could be good for the people who live in hundreds of Saginaw homes that are threatened with water supplies because of overdue bills.

The $ 12 million fund is particularly designed to help people in arrears, including water utilities.

However, officials remain concerned about the relative lack of response from affected Saginaw residents, who may not know that there is a solution to their problem.

Dry reception

In some cases, the silence emanating from affected homes could have a simple explanation: maybe no one is home.

In early June, water was turned off in 236 homes before a two-week lockdown began on Monday, June 28. In total, service was restored to 155 of these 236 homes after residents there paid their bills and established a payment schedule with the city, or began the process of seeking financial assistance elsewhere.

As of Wednesday, 81 houses were without a water supply. Officials say 13 citizens living in these apartments are in contact with city officials. They couldn’t reach anyone who lived in the other 68 dry houses.

“Many of the accounts that haven’t contacted us are most likely empty,” said Lori Brown, Saginaw’s finance director. “I see a lot of accounts with zero (water usage) for several months, e-mails sent back, and bad phone numbers on file.”

More than 500 homes remain on the list of homes at risk of water closures in the coming weeks and months.

While other homes in this group may be empty, officials believe many people may avoid contact for reasons including embarrassment over the accumulated debt. The lack of communication can result in residents missing the help available.

“We warned people about it,” said Brenda Moore, the mayor of Saginaw. “It is so sad that we only react at the witching hour. The residents have to understand that if we come out of our silos and unite, we can move this city forward. “

Officials say employees started emailing notifications in January 2021, calling the numbers listed on the 750 accounts at the time.

Employees warned local residents of the end of a pandemic moratorium on shutting down water utilities and informed them about supportive organizations such as United Way of Saginaw County.

The federal moratorium ended in March; Saginaw extended his moratorium until June 15.

“If we don’t spend it, someone else will”

Now that the two-week suspension of the water lock has effectively extended the moratorium, Davis hopes the borrowed time will allow affected residents to finally get in touch with funding.

“We currently have an abundance of funds to help people with homelessness, utility bills, or other issues,” she said of United Way of Saginaw County’s resources. “We want to make people aware of these programs so that they are not underused.”

While other funds are available, the largest pool of financial support for the nonprofit comes from a program called CERA (short for Covid Emergency Rental Assistance). Saginaw County’s $ 12 million in CERA funds are provided by the Michigan State Housing Development Authority through the U.S. pandemic-related CARES bill totaling $ 2.2 trillion.

Davis said $ 3.2 million in CERA funding was available for the county earlier this week, but that number rose significantly through Wednesday, June 30, when state officials told her organization they were now Could distribute $ 12 million to qualified residents.

CERA guidelines dictate that United Way of Saginaw County must distribute the $ 12 million by the end of 2022, she said.

“We urge landlords and tenants to seek help,” said Davis. “If we don’t spend it, someone else will.”

A campaign to educate these residents about resources kicked off this week.

The mayor was among the members of the Saginaw city council, staff and representatives of local non-profit organizations who are available to help affected residents. The three-day information campaign began on Wednesday.

About 20 residents came to the water supply.

The group is expected to be available again on Thursday and Friday, July 1 and 2, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on the first floor of City Hall, 1315 S. Washington.

Residents are encouraged to bring ID, a copy of their water bill, and proof of income.

Nonprofits expected at the sessions include the First Ward Community Service and the Saginaw Community Action Center.

Davis said United Way of Saginaw County officials will also be in attendance. She attended the Wednesday meeting in the town hall.

Start the process

For residents interested in CERA funding, Davis recommended calling first the Northeast Michigan Chapter of 2-1-1, a nonprofit that acts as a gateway to resources available from organizations such as United Way of Saginaw County.

To connect to the service, individuals must dial 2-1-1 on their phones. The operators can be reached every full hour every day, including public holidays.

In some cases, residents may be better suited to resources other than CERA funds, Davis said. Operators with 2-1-1 can make this decision.

“It’s just more efficient when people call the process with 2-1-1,” she said.

For residents affiliated with United Way of Saginaw County, staff there determine the viability of each applicant by assessing factors such as annual income and family size. For example, a single resident must earn less than $ 36,000 a year to qualify; a four-person household must earn less than $ 51,600 a year in total.

These dollar numbers represent 80% of the median median income in the region; a percentage set under the CERA program. David said most grant programs use math, which requires residents to earn less than 50% of the median median income.

“The fact that we can get 80% or less is great,” she said. “During the pandemic, it was recognized that more people needed help. This means that more people can seek help. “

Residents across the county have already used the program, Davis said.

When CERA funds were available for distribution by United Way of Saginaw County in March 2021, the amount available was $ 5.6 million. In the three months since then, citizens have been allocated $ 2.4 million.

Of that money spent, $ 1.9 million was provided to Saginaw County residents seeking rental assistance, $ 469,849 for customers requiring assistance with water or electricity bills, and $ 28,500 for Internet service costs for the residents.

“In our community, many people struggle to make ends meet,” said Davis. “It’s hard to imagine what it’s like to live without water and electricity, but there is a real need. We want to make sure that we meet this need. “

Read more on MLive:

Saginaw is temporarily suspending water closures as the city ramps up the information campaign

Nonprofit organization 2-1-1 can offer a lifeline for 750 Saginaw homes on the list of water closures

While the water closures in Saginaw continue, residents face costly fines and demolished houses

Water authority might get monetary savings, enhance belief, officers say | Information, Sports activities, Jobs

News Photo by Steve Schulwitz Gordon Luczak from the Alpena community loads laundry into his washing machine at home on Monday. If Alpena Township and Alpena form a water authority, ending the ongoing litigation over city-charged water tariffs, which the municipality believes is unfair, Luczak said he would support it.

ALPENA – municipalities are forming water authorities to help ensure equity between communities and customers and reduce operating costs, officials from several existing Michigan authorities said.

Alpena and Alpena Township can create one agency – essentially a separate board of directors that oversees infrastructure or services in multiple municipalities – to end the city and municipality’s nearly ten-year struggle over water and sewage rates. Alpena Mayor Matt Waligora and Alpena Municipality Leader Nathan Skibbe said they had productive conversations.

The community, which buys water and sanitation services from the city, disagreed with a rate hike from the city, and the ensuing legal battle rose as high as the Michigan Supreme Court, which recently sent the case back to the local court for trial.

Officials have released few details on what an agency might look like in the Alpena area, but members of established Michigan agencies say cost benefits and improved interstate relationships result from its establishment. Committees made up of appointed representatives from each municipality served by the authority make decisions about the water supply and set tariffs.

Gordon Luczak, resident of the Alpena municipality, said the litigation in the Alpena-Alpena municipality had been going on too long and if an authority helps put an end to it, he is for it, especially if it means paying the same fees how the city’s residents pays.

Alpena Township adds its own water fees for township customers.

Under one agency, all residential customers would pay the same rate based on their water usage.

“I live two blocks from the people in town and I pay a higher price than they do if I use the same system.” Said Luczak. “It’s stupid.”

WHAT ARE THE ADVANTAGES?

Officials from Alpena and Alpena Township have investigated five Michigan water authorities, including the Huron Shore Regional Utility Authority, which serves customers in the Tawas, East Tawas and Oscoda, AuSable, Alabaster, Baldwin and Greenbush townships.

Annaw Horning, city manager for Tawas, said the agency allows municipalities to have equal control over setting regulations, tariffs, and deciding on capital projects.

Without the authority, Tawas would become a regular customer at Baldwin Township, which owns the water production facility, unless Tawas spent millions of dollars building its own facility, she said.

“That would be expensive and something that is really not possible at the moment.” She said. “We’d rather continue to share resources and be part of the decision-making process.”

Tim Sheridan, superintendent and licensed water company for the Blumfield Reese Water Authority near the Thumb, said the agency sources its water from Saginaw and then sells it to its 1,459 customers. Blumfield Township and Reese Village established the authority in 1968. Denmark Township joined in 1997 and a small portion of Gilford Township came on board in 2015.

Sheridan said an agency was cutting operating costs.

“There is a clear cost advantage as the costs are shared among more customers.” he said. “Instead of each municipality having to bear the cost of its own system and having administrators and accounts for each, one unit oversees a system. The authority is basically a separate municipality. “

Authorities are also helping to complete infrastructure projects more efficiently, Sheridan said.

Rather than having multiple municipalities pay for and maintain their own systems, an agency can identify the infrastructure issues that require attention and allocate the funds raised by selling the water to address them.

“The system is viewed as a whole and not several small systems that are connected to one another.” he said. “You get more for your money and the areas that are most needed are addressed wherever it is.”

When communities work together for whatever reason, forms of trust, relationships improve, and everyone learns more about the other community and their struggles. Horning said this could lead them to collaborate more regularly and share other resources.

She said local government leaders are not always on par but can leave most disagreements behind and work in the best interests of residents.

“It can absolutely improve relationships, but also if you vote on the other side it can have the opposite effect.” She said. “Overall, however, I think that working together and making decisions together has a positive effect and you learn more about the people and their community.”

THE CHALLENGES

Horning said that getting everyone on the same page early on will help an agency succeed later.

Most often, one or more municipalities make sacrifices in order to form an authority, such as the transfer of ownership of production and treatment facilities.

The proposed agency between Alpena and Alpena Township could mimic the Huron Shore agency, which would mean the city giving up ownership of its system and rolling it up into the agency. It is not clear that this would happen as no proposal for an authority in the Alpena region has been finalized.

“Some sacrifices have to be made, and then you will have some residents who think they should get more because they are more into authority.” She said. “If you can overcome these early hurdles, it is a fair and efficient way to provide services fairly to everyone.”

Often times, the municipalities in the agency with larger population groups and more infrastructure often receive more investment to maintain the system through these municipalities. According to Horning, educating the public about how water pipes and other infrastructures affect their service will help people overcome the feeling that they are getting less service for the same amount of money.

“Some people will feel changed for a moment” She said. “You need to know that it is a system and what affects one church affects everyone.”

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Helix Water District: Watch New Video – The place Does Your Cash Go

April 9, 2021

Ever wondered what your water bill is paying for in the Helix Water District?

We are a non-profit agency. This means that every dollar we collect from customer bills goes directly to providing clean and reliable water.

Almost half of your water bill is paid for buying imported water. The rest of your account will cover the costs of running, maintaining, managing, protecting and improving your 24/7 water service.

When you pay for the cost and get the value, Helix customers can be assured they are getting superior value at a reasonable cost.

Check out our video and see your dollar flow.

Mayor vows to retain state cash for Sewerage & Water Board, regardless of metropolis’s large stimulus payout

Mayor LaToya Cantrell said the state has already allocated $ 20 million to the Sewerage & Water Board to incorporate a new Entergy substation planned for its Carrollton facility. It’s money she wants to keep despite New Orleans standing in line to receive a huge grant from the latest round of federal pandemic aid. Cantrell told an S&WB board meeting on Wednesday that she had heard Baton Rouge “rumble” about possible efforts to take back the state money. She said she would reach out to the New Orleans Legislative Delegation for assistance. The latest round of pandemic funds, part of the American Rescue Plan Act, includes $ 375 million for New Orleans – one of the largest grants for any U.S. city and by far the largest in Louisiana. Cantrell said money will offset the city’s spending and loss of tax revenue as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak. “No effort should be made to divert those (state) dollars that have been identified for the substation integration,” said Cantrell. The Sewerage & Water Board needs to borrow $ 34 million from Entergy’s finance department to pay for the substation, which is scheduled to go live in 2023. The state’s $ 20 million will be used to add this new power source to the facility’s existing grid, Ghassan Korban, executive director of the Sewerage & Water Board, said the utility will deploy nearly $ 30 million in federal funds that are already in place available for all of his power plant modernization plans. He is also filing an additional $ 46 million with the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Korban said the Sewerage & Water Board will tap multiple wells to spend $ 45 million on three more frequency converters needed for Entergy’s modern power generation, and hide it for use in its outdated drainage facility. A portion of $ 5 million will come from the 2019 Fair Share Agreement to align tourism tax revenue with urban infrastructure needs. Another $ 30 million will be borrowed from Entergy. Cantrell and other local officials are expected to explore several state ways to pay for Sewerage & Water Board projects. Without state or federal funding, the Sewerage & Water Board would likely have to reach out to customers to pay to upgrade its electrical grid. A series of 10% annual increases in S&W bills that started in 2013 ended last year. A rating service that reviews the utility’s ability to borrow money said a further increase in customer rate would likely be required if the government fails to pay the bill for their large-scale projects.

Mayor LaToya Cantrell said the state has already allocated $ 20 million to the Sewerage & Water Board to incorporate a new Entergy substation planned for its Carrollton facility. It’s money she wants to keep despite New Orleans poised to receive a huge allocation from the latest round of federal pandemic aid.

Cantrell told an S&WB board meeting Wednesday that she had heard Baton Rouge “rumble” about possible efforts to withdraw the state money. She said she would reach out to the New Orleans Legislative Delegation for assistance.

The latest round of pandemic funds, part of the American Rescue Plan Act, includes $ 375 million for New Orleans – one of the largest grants for a U.S. city and by far the largest in Louisiana. Cantrell said money was meant to offset the city’s expenses and lose tax revenue as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak.

“No effort should be made to divert those (state) dollars that have been identified for the substation integration,” said Cantrell.

The Sewerage & Water Board needs to borrow $ 34 million from Entergy’s finance department to pay for the substation, which is scheduled to go live in 2023. The state’s $ 20 million will be used to add this new power source to the facility’s existing grid.

Ghassan Korban, executive director of the Sewerage & Water Board, said the utility will already be putting $ 30 million in federal funds into its overall plans to modernize the power plant. It is also filing an additional $ 46 million with the Federal Emergency Management Agency, he said.

Korban said the Sewerage & Water Board will tap multiple sources to spend $ 45 million on three more frequency converters. This equipment is required to take advantage of Entergy’s modern form of electricity for use in obsolete drainage systems. A portion of $ 5 million will come from the 2019 Fair Share Agreement to align tourism tax revenue with the needs of the city’s infrastructure. Another $ 30 million will be borrowed from Entergy.

Cantrell and other local officials are expected to explore multiple government channels to pay for Sewerage & Water Board projects. Without state or federal funding, the Sewerage & Water Board would likely have to reach out to customers to pay to upgrade its electrical grid.

A series of 10% annual increases in S&W bills that started in 2013 ended last year. A rating service that reviews the utility’s ability to borrow money has determined that if the government fails to pay the bill for their large projects, further increases in customer rates would likely be required.

Fort Smith Board approves more cash for Parrot Island water slide

The Fort Smith Board of Directors voted to fund a new slide at Parrot Island Waterpark. The City and College of Sebastian County each previously voted to allocate $ 250,000 to expand Parrot Island Waterpark with a new liner upon completion of the FlowRider amenity.

The $ 250,000 for the expansion was included in the city’s budget for 2021. However, it will require an additional $ 220,833 to build the slide the city needs, deputy city administrator Jeff Dingman told the board on Tuesday, March 16, at the city’s regular board meeting.

The original plan for the new slide was to replace the yellow “body slide” in the park with new fiberglass for a “tube slide”. The new foil would fall off the existing foil tower, which can only serve four foils. The yellow slide has been changed and is now working properly, Dingman said.

“We prefer to keep it operational and add a new fifth slide to the park rather than replace one of the original four slides,” said Dingman.

The new slide will be the first tube slide for the park. However, building a new slide requires an additional, separate slide tower and support structure for the pump house.

“These items are being created with future expansion in mind, making it relatively easy to add up to three additional slides in the future,” said Dingman in a memo of the project’s budget.

The city’s total share of the foil expansion project is expected to be $ 470,833, Dingman said.

“Sales were expected to drop significantly in 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, which resulted in departments cutting their budgets to absorb the forecast economic shock. However, Fort Smith failed to realize that the expected economic impact of the pandemic and sales tax revenue were above sales estimates. Therefore, an allocation from the additional (budgeted above) sales tax revenue for parks generated in both 2020 and 2021 is required to fund the additional amount the city needs to expand Parrot Island water park, ”Dingman said in the memo .

The additional funding won’t take away any money for planned park projects in 2021, said Doug Reinert, director of Parks & Recreation. The board unanimously approved the regulation for the additional funds.

In November, City Administrator Carl Geffken informed directors that Parrot Island was having a difficult 2020 fiscal year due to the pandemic. It had 59,248 visitors and total sales of $ 1.003 million for the year. At a total cost of $ 1.301, the park ended the season in a deficit of $ 297,973. However, Settle and Geffken found this was an anomaly and the park had made money every two years. In 2019, Parrot Island had total sales of $ 1.351 million and total sales of $ 1.273 million for net income of $ 77,527. The attendance in 2019 was 91,589.

Mayor George McGill also announced at the meeting that the city would host a second mass COVID vaccination clinic on May 5th. The city hosted a COVID-19 vaccination clinic at the Fort Smith Convention Center on February 24. There will be a clinic on Wednesday (March 17th) for those who received their first shot at this clinic and need their second shot.

Cash for Lake Champlain water high quality initiatives

Saturday, February 27, 2021

Money for water quality projects on Lake Champlain

Recently, I wrote through the Adirondack Council and asked the state for funding a comprehensive study of water quality in the Adirondacks. (Speaking of advice, it’s easy hired someone outside of Governor Andrew Cuomo’s office to be his new Vice President for Conservation.)

I’ve been thinking about how much money is influencing public conversation – not just advertising and PR, but also money or a lack of money for research.

Decades ago, money poured into the Adirondacks to research the causes of acid rain. When the acid rain subsided, this money was understandably diverted elsewhere.

However, some new money has come in. One of the most interesting sources of money for some time, in large part, has been Senator Patrick Leahy’s longstanding interest in protecting Lake Champlain. The interest is shown in the form of money for the exploration of the lake and its massive watershed, which includes the Saranac, Boquet and Ausable rivers and their headwaters in the Adirondacks.

Check out just two of the grants recently awarded by one of Leahy’s beneficiaries. the Lake Champlain Basin program::

Editor’s Note: This first appeared in Ry’s weekly Water Line newsletter. Sign up to stay up to date on the water quality from the Adirondacks.