No circumstances of omicron variant discovered within the U.S. up to now, CDC says

Pediatric doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech Covid-19 vaccine lie on a table at National Jewish Health on November 3, 2021 in Denver, Colorado.

Michael Ciaglo | Getty Images News

The US has not yet found any cases of the new Omicron Covid variant, the CDC announced late Friday, referring to a heavily mutated strain of the virus that the World Health Organization has classified as a “variant of concern”.

“So far, no cases of this variant have been identified in the USA,” said the statement by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“CDC continuously monitors variants and the US variant monitoring system has reliably detected new variants in this country. We expect Omicron to be identified quickly if it shows up in the US, ”it said.

The newly identified strain – referred to as Pedigree B.1.1.529 – Was first discovered in South Africa and was a cause for concern due to the rapid rise in the number of coronavirus cases in the country’s Gauteng province.

The UN health agency only designates strains of Covid as worrying variants if they are more transmissible, more virulent, or better at bypassing vaccines and therapeutics.

“This variant has a large number of mutations, some of which are worrying,” said the World Health Organization. “Preliminary evidence suggests an increased risk of reinfection in this variant compared to others” [variants of concern]. The number of cases of this variant seems to be increasing in almost all provinces of South Africa. “

The US on Friday imposed travel restrictions on non-US citizens from South Africa and seven other countries in the region. The restrictions begin Monday and are part of a global effort to mitigate the spread of Omicron, according to senior Biden government officials.

The other countries affected by the ban were Botswana, Eswatini, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia and Zimbabwe.

It was not known how long the restrictions would apply.

– CNBC’s Christina Wilkie contributed to this report.

Inventory futures fall amid fears of latest Covid variant present in South Africa

Johannes Eisele | AFP | Getty Images

US stocks fell on Friday renewed Covid fears about a new variant found in South Africa.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average lost 800 points, or more than 2%, while the S&P 500 and Nasdaq Composite were down 1.4% and 0.9%, respectively. Friday is a shortened trading day due to the Thanksgiving holiday as U.S. markets close at 1:00 p.m. ET.

The downward movement came after WHO officials on Thursday before a new Covid-19 variant discovered in South Africa. The new variant contains more mutations in the spike protein, the cell-binding component of the virus, than the highly contagious Delta variant. Because of these mutations, scientists fear that vaccine resistance may be increased, although WHO said more research is needed.

the Britain has temporarily suspended flights from six African countries due to the variant. Israel banned travel to multiple countries after reporting a case to a traveler. Two cases have been identified in Hong Kong. Belgium also confirmed a case.

“When I read that there is one [case] in Belgium and one in Botswana, we’ll wake up next week and find one in this country. And I am not going to recommend anyone buy anything today until we are sure it isn’t going to happen and I can’t be sure that it doesn’t, “said CNBC’s Jim Cramer.

Bond prices rose and yields fell in the midst of a flight to safety. The return on the benchmark 10-year US Treasury bond decreased by 13 basis points to 1.511% (1 basis point corresponds to 0.01%). This was a sharp reversal as yields jumped above 1.68% at times earlier in the week. Bond yields move in the opposite direction to prices.

Oil prices also fell US crude oil futures declined 6.2% to $ 73.57 a barrel, while the South African rand fell 1.7% against the greenback to 16.231 a barrel.

The Asian markets were hit hard by Friday trading, with the Japanese Nikkei 225 and Hong Kong Hang Seng indexes each falling more than 2%. Bitcoin fell 8%.

Often referred to as Wall Street’s “fear measure,” the Cboe volatility index rose to 28, its highest level in two months.

Travel-related stocks were hit the hardest as Carnival Corp. and Royal Caribbean both lost more than 10% in pre-opening trading. United Airlines, Delta Air Lines, and American Airlines each fell more than 7%. Boeing lost 6%. Marriott International and Hilton Worldwide were down more than 5%.

Bank stocks fell on fears of a slowdown in economic activity and falling interest rates. Bank of America, Goldman Sachs and Citigroup each lost more than 4%.

Industrials associated with the global economy, led by Caterpillar, fell 3%. Dow Inc. lost 2%.

Chevron lost nearly 5% as energy stocks reacted to the surge in crude oil prices.

On the other hand, investors pushed their way into vaccine manufacturers. The Moderna share gained more than 8%. Pfizer shares were up 5%.

Some of the home games that had risen in the first few months of the pandemic were higher again. Zoom-Video added 9%. Netflix was up 2%.

“It’s important to emphasize that very little is known about this newest strain at this point, including whether it can bypass vaccines or how severe it is compared to other mutations. Therefore, it is difficult to make informed investment decisions at this point. ”Paul Hickey of the Investment Group said in a statement to clients. “Historically, chasing a rally or selling into a sharp decline (especially on a very illiquid trading day) is rarely profitable, but that doesn’t stop a lot of people this morning.”

Several investment professionals told CNBC on Friday that the sell-off could be a buying opportunity.

“Friday is the day after Thanksgiving, probably not that many traders on their desks with an early close today. Therefore, potentially lower liquidity is causing part of the withdrawal, “said Ajene Oden of BNY Mellon Investor Solutions on CNBC’s”Squawk box. ”“ But the reaction we’re seeing is an investor buying opportunity. We have to think long-term. “

CNBC Pro Stock Pick and Investment Trends:

Markets closed for Thanksgiving Thursday, so stocks posted modest gains on Wednesday that dampened the week’s losses for the S&P 500 and Nasdaq Composite. During the holiday weeks, the trading volume tends to be low.

A surge in Treasury yields earlier this week put high-growth stocks under pressure. The Nasdaq is down 1.3% for the week, while the S&P 500 is up less than 0.1% and the Dow is up about 0.6%.

The last few weeks of the year are typically a busy time for the market, with the so-called Santa Claus rally usually bringing happy holidays for Wall Street. The S&P 500 is up 25% since the start of the year.

Friday also marks the unofficial start of the Christmas shopping season as investors look to Black Friday insights to set US consumer sentiment.

Retail executives have been speaking for the past few weeks about how to deal with supply chain issues and inflation. It also remains to be seen whether the discussion of supply chain issues caused consumers to start their Christmas shopping earlier, potentially hurting fourth-quarter sales.

“I wouldn’t be surprised if that was a dynamic around the holiday season,” said Sarah Henry, portfolio manager at Logan Capital Management. She added that her firm was looking for companies with long-term strategic advantages rather than trying to bet on the best Christmas sales results.

There were also several strong economic reports on Wednesday, with personal income and consumer spending higher than expected for October and Initial jobless claims at their lowest level since 1969. Core PCE, the Fed’s preferred inflation meter, remained higher at 4.1%.

No major business news is planned for Friday.

South African rand takes hit on new Covid fears, variant

South African rand.

RapidEye | iStock | Getty Images

The South African rand fell sharply against the dollar on Friday after a new variant with many mutations was discovered in the country.

The currency fell as low as 16.2391 against the greenback during Friday’s Asian session and was last trading 1.6% weaker at 16.2215 per dollar.

The losses came as investors turned to safe-haven currencies like that Japanese YEN, which is up about 0.6% against the greenback to 114.69 per dollar. The USA Dollar indextracking the greenback versus its peers was at 96.712 – compared to levels below 96.5 seen earlier this week.

World Health Organization officials said Thursday They are monitoring a new variant with numerous mutations in the spike protein – the part of the virus that binds to body cells. The health authority is planning a special meeting for Friday to discuss what this can mean for vaccines and treatments.

According to the WHO, the variant with the designation B.1.1.529 was found in small numbers in South Africa.

“We don’t know much about it yet. What we do know is that this variant has a large number of mutations. “Dr. Maria Van Kerkhove, WHO technical director on Covid-19, said in a question-and-answer session that was broadcast live on the organization’s social media channels.

Hours after the announcement, the UK announced that it would Temporarily suspend flights from six African countries.

– CNBC’s Hannah Miao contributed to this report.

WHO calls particular assembly to debate new Covid variant from South Africa with ‘giant variety of mutations’

RT: Maria Van Kerkhove, Head ai Emerging Diseases and Zoonosis at the World Health Organization (WHO), speaks during a press conference on the situation of the coronavirus at the United Nations in Geneva, Switzerland, January 29, 2020.

Denis Balibouse | Reuters

The World Health Organization is monitoring a new variant with numerous mutations in the spike protein and is planning a special meeting on Friday to discuss what that could mean for vaccines and treatments, officials said Thursday.

According to the WHO, the variant with the designation B.1.1.529 was found in small numbers in South Africa.

“We don’t know much about it yet. What we do know is that this variant has a large number of mutations. “Dr. Maria Van Kerkhove, WHO technical director on Covid-19, said in a question-and-answer session that was broadcast live on the organization’s social media channels.

The new variant is monitored as a Covid cases are increasing worldwide on the way to the Christmas season, with WHO reporting on hotspots in all regions and particularly in Europe.

South African scientists have discovered more than 30 mutations in the spike protein, the part of the virus that attaches to cells in the body, said South African scientist Tulio de Oliveira in a media briefing hosted by the South African Ministry of Health on Thursday.

Variant B.1.1.529 contains several mutations associated with increased antibody resistance that can decrease the effectiveness of vaccines, as well as mutations that generally make them more contagious, according to the slides he presented at the meeting. No other mutations have been seen in the new variant so far, so scientists don’t yet know whether they’re significant or will change the behavior of the virus, the presentation said.

The variant has spread rapidly in Gauteng Province, which is home to the country’s largest city, Johannesburg.

“Especially when the ascent occurs in Gauteng, everyone travels in and out of Gauteng from all corners of South Africa. So it goes without saying that in the next few days the start of an increasing positivity rate and increasing numbers will take place a matter of days and weeks until we see that, “said South African Health Minister Joe Phaahla during the briefing.

The variant has also been detected in Botswana and Hong Kong, said Phaahla.

“Right now, researchers are coming together to understand where these mutations are in the spike protein and the furin cleavage site and what this could potentially mean for our diagnostics or therapeutics and vaccines,” said Van Kerkhove. She said there are fewer than 100 complete genomic sequences of the new mutation.

The virus development working group will decide whether B.1.1.529 will be an interesting or worrying variant, after which the WHO would assign a Greek name to the variant, Van Kerkhove said.

“It is really important that there are no knee-jerk reactions here, especially with regard to South Africa,” said Dr. Mike Ryan, Executive Director of the WHO Emergency Program.

Well being Variant: Why journey nurses matter (and make good cash)

SIOUX FALLS, SD – Travel Nurses. They are healthcare professionals, reinforcements who were instrumental in helping understaffed nursing staff during the COVID-19 pandemic.

And you probably haven’t even heard of it.

While not every short-term caregiver makes big bucks, high paychecks are possible, especially when health systems are desperate for help. At some point that year, a health system in South Dakota was looking for critical care, crisis response nurses and offering more than $ 6,000 a week.

On the latest episode of The Health Variant podcast, presenter and NewsMD health correspondent Jeremy Fugleberg speaks to Professor Joshua Gottlieb, Associate Professor and Nursing Researcher at the Harris School of Public Policy at the University of Chicagofor answers on why traveling nurses are so important and why they are highest dollar can be paid for what they do.

Also discussed: Gottliebs Proposal to compensate health workers for the provision of vaccines, potential incentives to vaccinate more people, increase office hours, and other steps.



“The Health Variant” deals with health issues that are important to the region such as fitness, COVID-19, cannabis and telemedicine, introduces listeners to places and people they need to know and offers behind-the-scenes coverage.

NewsMD is a brand of Forum Communications focused on health and health coverage, primarily in the upper Midwest, including coverage of industry news, research, trends, technology, economic and political topics.

The Health Variant podcast is available on major podcast apps including:

For comments or suggested topics for podcast episodes, contact Fugleberg at jfugleberg@forumcomm.com or on Twitter: @jayfug.

Delta variant infects extremely vaccinated jail inhabitants, however few hospitalized

A sheriff’s deputy measures on Wednesday, April 22.

Sandy Huffaker | AFP | Getty Images

The rapidly spreading Delta variant broke through a federal prison in Texas in the summer and infected both the unvaccinated and fully vaccinated populations, but few were hospitalized, according to a report released Tuesday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Of the 233 detainees in the prison that was not named, 185 or 79% were fully vaccinated Covid19according to the new report published in the agency’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

From July to August, 172 inmates or 74% of the federal prison population were infected with Covid, according to the CDC. The Delta variant hit the unvaccinated harder, the agency said, and infected 39 of the 42 prisoners who were not given the syringes. That compares to the 129 infections from 185 fully vaccinated people.

According to the CDC, four people were hospitalized, three of whom were unvaccinated, and one person who was unvaccinated died.

The agency said the report shows the potential for Delta variant outbreaks in community facilities, including correctional facilities and detention centers, even in locations and populations with high vaccination rates.

“Although attack rates, hospital admissions and deaths were higher in unvaccinated people than vaccinated people, the duration of positive serial test results was similar for both groups,” the agency wrote in the report.

Vaccinating the majority of the US population remains vital as vaccinations are highly effective in preventing serious illness, hospitalizations and deaths, the agency said.

The new report comes as federal health officials urge all Americans to get vaccinated and continue to wear masks indoors, especially in meeting places, as the highly contagious Delta variant spreads across the country.

The US still has a dangerously high number of cases. The nation reports an average of more than 138,900 cases a day on Tuesday, according to data from Johns Hopkins University. The country reports an average of more than 1,900 deaths a day, data from Johns Hopkins shows.

Earlier this month, President Joe Biden outlined a broad plan to increase Covid vaccination rates in the US, pressures on private employers to immunize their workforce; and order vaccinations for federal employees, contractors and healthcare workers.

The plan is to offer boosters of Pfizer and Moderna vaccines to the general population.

An advisory committee to the Food and Drug Administration on Friday recommended unanimously Pfizer Booster Vaccinations For People 65+ And Other At-Risk Americans. A final decision from the agency is now expected every day.

Inflation, labor and delta variant hit restaurant homeowners, Goldman Sachs information finds

Restaurants across the county have been looking forward to the economy reopening in recent months as Covid vaccines continued to spread and pent-up consumer demand was felt.

But headwinds from supply chain interruptions to labor shortages and rising costs hit the industry as the contagious Delta variant tarnishes hopes of a return to normal.

Small business owners in the food, restaurant and hospitality sectors are more concerned than most about the ongoing disruption of the pandemic, according to new data from Goldman Sachs’ 10,000 Small Business Voices program. The data shows that 84% of owners in these sectors are concerned about the impact of rising Covid-19 infection rates on businesses, compared to 75% of the entire small business population.

Almost all of them saw an increase in operating costs, with 93% believing that inflationary pressures have increased since June, negatively affecting finances.

The data subset of 117 food, restaurant and hospitality owners came from a broader survey of 1,145 participants in the Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses program earlier this month.

The numbers underscore the continuing pressures restaurants face even in an economy recovering from the worst of the damage caused by the coronavirus. While the introduction of vaccines and looser public health restrictions have brought the industry closer to normal, challenges remain as restaurant owners look to fall.

Ruby Bugarin, who runs Margaritas and Pepe restaurants in the greater Los Angeles area, said both the availability of goods and the higher cost hit her business. Products like crabs are harder to find, the cost of chicken and pork has increased by more than $ 1 a pound, and the prices of other goods have increased.

“In the past two or three weeks, the price of avocados has gone from about $ 40 a box to $ 85 a box. So that’s more than double, ”said Bugarin, a member of the Small Business Voices program. “We can’t do the same to our customers – we raise prices once or twice a year.”

Labor costs are also rising in her two restaurants with a total of 63 employees. Bugarin said she would like to add a chef or two at each location, but instead pays overtime weekly to her current staff.

Restaurant, hospitality and hospitality owners like Bugarin are also more affected by work problems than in the wider small business community. The data shows that 79% of these business owners say the challenges for employees have worsened since the pandemic, compared with 64% overall.

Recent data from the National Federation of Independent Business underscores the labor law issues that weigh on the optimism of small businesses. The vacancies in August were above the historic 48-year average for the second month in a row.

“In June, despite inflation and despite labor challenges, 67% of small businesses said they believed the US is on the right track,” said Joe Wall, national director of Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses Voices. “That number is now 38%. The delta variant is sure to be the # 1 issue in terms of sentiment change, and then you pile on it, inflation dynamics and the challenges facing the workforce.”

With the pandemic taxing restaurant operators, Goldman’s data shows that nearly 40% of food and hospitality companies say they expect they’ll need to take out a loan or line of credit for their business this fall or winter. This corresponds to 29% of the companies as a whole.

The Small Business Administration recently announced a revision of the Economic Injury Disaster Loan program for businesses. The credit limit will be increased to $ 2 million and recipients will be allowed to use the funds to prepay business debts, which allows restaurants to use the money on business debts and more.

“At a time when small business restaurants still have extreme working capital needs, these changes will improve the prospects for thousands of operators and improve the economic prospects for communities large and small,” said Sean Kennedy, executive vice president of public policy at the National Restaurant Association said in a statement. The group worked with the SBA on the new small business terms.

Beyond these changes, small business and restaurant owners and advocates have urged lawmakers to top up the $ 28.6 billion restaurant revitalization fund. It granted grants to the industry but was quickly exhausted due to high demand.

“We were able to distribute it to over 100,000 companies across the country, but demand was 2.5 times as much,” SBA administrator Isabel Guzman told CNBC about the RRF last month. “There are still restaurants, food and beverage companies that need support. We know they have been hardest hit, and will often be the last to reopen in communities, but they define so many of our main streets.I can’t say exactly what the actions of Congress will be, but the SBA would be ready to take these Manage programs quickly, efficiently and fairly. “

Downward Stress on Cash-Market Charges Continues; Delta Variant Hits China Companies Sector

Good day. The Federal Reserve’s primary tool for controlling economic dynamism is ticking down again, increasing the possibility that officials may need to take technical measures to get it going again. Meanwhile, China’s service sector suffered an unexpectedly severe blow in August when a wave of coronavirus infections across the country triggered new lockdowns and sent an official measure of non-manufacturing activity to a contraction area.

Now for today’s news and analysis.

Top news

Covid-19 Delta variant beats up China’s service sector

China’s official non-manufacturing purchasing managers’ index, which tracks activity in construction and services, slumped to 47.5 in August from 53.3 in the previous month, according to data released Tuesday by the National Bureau of Statistics. The value of 47.5 – which fell far short of what economists had forecast for a value comfortably above 50 – marks the measure’s first break into contracting territory since February 2020, at the height of the initial coronavirus explosion that led to the lockdown Hubei Province.

Derby’s Take: Funds rate is softening, adding to the specter of technical rate boosts

By Michael S. Derby

The effective key interest rate has been slipping since around mid-August after it was raised by the Fed at the beginning of summer following a technical rate hike. The key interest rate, which had been around 0.10% for most of the summer, fell to 0.9% on August 18 and again to 0.8% on Monday. If the key rate stays soft or softens and this shift proves to be sustained, the Fed may have to react by revoking the settings of its interest rate control toolkit. Continue reading.

Important developments around the world

Oil industry investigates damage after Hurricane Ida slam in Louisiana

Energy companies assessed the condition of refineries, pipelines, petrochemicals and offshore oil rigs along the central Gulf of Mexico on Monday, the day after Ida hit Louisiana as a powerful Category 4 hurricane.

Unfinished tractors and pickup trucks pile up as components become scarce

Manufacturers stack unfinished goods on factory floors and park incomplete vehicles in airport parking lots while waiting for missing parts, made scarce by supply chain problems that disrupt multiple industries.

New life and work choices enliven exurbs and bring new strains with them

Extra-urban areas have grown nearly twice as fast as domestic over the past decade, and there are signs that growth is accelerating as Americans prepare for a landscape where increased work from home means the need to commute decreased.

EU recommends stopping non-essential travel from the USA

The European Union recommended stopping non-essential travel from the US due to the increase in Covid-19 cases, diplomats said on Monday, ending a summer vacation break for American tourists.

Summary of the Financial Regulation

SEC chair warns against payment for order flow

Robinhood Markets Inc.’s shares plunged Monday after the chief of the Securities and Exchange Commission signaled he was ready to ban payments on the order flow, which makes up most of the online brokerage’s revenue.

Members Exchange urges regulators to fix stock prices for half a penny

Investors could see shares of Apple Inc. and Bank of America Corp. for $ 152.005 or $ 42.115 per share if regulators sign a proposal presented this week. Members Exchange, a startup exchange backed by major Wall Street firms, said in a proposal that the Securities and Exchange Commission should allow some heavily traded stocks to be valued in half-cent increments.

So far, direct listings have paid off for investors

Eyewear maker Warby Parker Inc. is the latest to file with the SEC for direct listing, demonstrating the persistence of the alternative path to public markets for companies that don’t need to raise money.

Foresight

Wednesday (all times ET)

9:30 p.m .: Bank of Japan’s Wakatabe speaks at a meeting with local leaders in Hiroshima

Thursday

8:30 a.m .: US Department of Commerce releases international trade data for July

research

Goldman Sachs says evictions threaten

Around 750,000 American households are now threatened with eviction from rental apartments in the wake of the latest political changes that protect the financially needy, Goldman Sachs said in a message to customers. The investment bank estimates that between 2.5 million and 3.5 million households are behind on rents and owe landlords up to $ 17 billion, while state aid to tenants is slow. “The strength of the housing and rental market suggests that landlords will try to evict tenants who are behind on rent unless they receive government support,” the note said. According to analysts at Goldman Sachs, this should not have a very negative impact on the economy. They say in the note that “Our literature research shows that an eviction episode of this magnitude is a small burden on consumption and employment growth.”

– Michael S. Derby

Basis points

Asking rents for homes rose nearly 13% year-to-date through July, the highest annual increase in five years, according to real estate data company Yardi Matrix.

US pending home sales declined for the second straight month in July, according to the National Association of Realtors, whose index of pending home sales fell 1.8% from June to 110.7. Pending home sales declined 8.5% year over year in July. (DJN)

Manufacturing output in Texas slowed in August, with the Dallas Fed’s Manufacturing Outlook Survey manufacturing index falling to 20.8 from July 31. The general business activity index, which rates general terms and conditions in the industry, fell from 27.3 to 9. (Dow Jones Newswires)

Aluminum forwards on the London Metal Exchange are up a third this year and prices are around 80% above their low in May 2020 when the pandemic restricted sales to the aerospace and transportation industries.

German inflation in August was 3.9% year-on-year, compared to 3.8% in July. (Dow Jones Newswires)

Business and household confidence in the euro zone fell slightly in August after hitting an all-time high in July, the European Commission said, noting that the economic sentiment indicator fell from 119.0 in July to 117.5. Economists polled by the Wall Street Journal expected an index of 118.0. (DJN)

Canada’s quarterly current account surplus rose to $ 3.58 billion or the equivalent of $ 2.84 billion in the second quarter as goods exports soared, Statistics Canada said. The data for the first quarter has been revised, Statistics Canada said, adding that the current account surplus for the first three months of the year was $ 1.82 billion, compared to an earlier estimate of $ 1.18 billion. (DJN)

(END) Dow Jones Newswires

Aug 31, 2021 9:35 AM ET (1:35 PM GMT)

Copyright (c) 2021 Dow Jones & Company, Inc.

Corporations rising extra cautious about delta variant, earnings calls present

A sign describes entry restrictions at a JLL office in the Aon Center in Chicago, Illinois, USA on Thursday, June 24, 2020.

Christopher Dilts | Bloomberg | Getty Images

When the reporting season started in earnest in mid-July, few companies asked questions or mentioned the Covid Delta variant.

That changed as new Covid-19 cases increased and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention changed their stance on masks for vaccinated people, according to a CNBC analysis of transcripts of calls.

From July 13th through Thursday, 142 companies have been in the S&P 500 of the 410 who reported their quarterly profits mentioned the delta variant by name or answered a question about it in their profit talks. Only 15% of these mentions came before July 27th – the same day the CDC said fully vaccinated people should wear a mask indoors in areas with high transmission rates. New Covid cases also rose steadily as the highly contagious Delta variant became the dominant strain of the virus in the USA

The US reports a seven-day average of more than 109,000 new cases as of August 5, nearly 28% more than a week ago, according to Johns Hopkins University.

For the most part, executives said their companies did not see any significant business impact with the rise in new cases.

Becton, Dickinson & Co., a medical technology company, was one of the few to report a change in consumer behavior and told analysts that fewer elective surgeries have been performed in some US states in recent weeks because of the variant. For the week ending August 1, 72% of beds in intensive care units in the United States were occupied, according to Johns Hopkins data.

But some companies with a more global footprint say it’s a different story outside of the US.

“An uneven recovery from the pandemic and an ascending delta variant in many countries around the world have shown us once again that the road to recovery will be a winding one.” Apple CEO Tim Cook said when the company called on July 27th.

Postings, the parent company of Kayak and OpenTable, said bookings were down 22% in July compared to 2019, a bigger drop than the 13% drop in June.

“In Europe, we noticed reductions in overnight stays in several of our most important countries, including Germany, France and Italy, in July,” said Booking CFO David Goulden on Wednesday at the company’s conference call.

Other companies reported supply chain disruptions as Covid cases accelerated in Asia and Europe. For example, rail operators Norfolk South said the Delta variant will affect its suppliers in Southeast Asia.

“We have a couple of factories that source parts from Southeast Asia and due to manufacturing issues there, they had to bring forward scheduled production shutdowns later this year,” said chief marketing officer Alan Shaw on the company’s conference call on July 28th. “And that has now had an impact on our production and our volumes.”

The Delta variant has also led some companies to issue more conservative projections, although most companies said they don’t expect any further lockdowns in the US.

Abiomed, a medical device maker, told analysts on its conference call Thursday that the lower end of its full-year revenue forecast sees “some persistent unevenness” from the variant, even though the company raised its outlook.

Beyond meatwhich is not part of the S&P 500 said that Restaurant operators are more conservative in their food orders due to the uncertainty caused by the delta variant and work-related challenges.

“For us, the main feature of the third quarter, and our forecast is simply a lack of visibility,” said CEO Ethan Brown on Thursday.

Disney will not attend CinemaCon in-person as delta variant rages in Las Vegas

Signage outside the Caesars Palace Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada on Sunday, May 02, 2021.

Roger Kisby | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Walt Disney Executives won’t be traveling to Las Vegas next month to attend the National Association of Theater Owners’ CinemaCon.

The company quoted growing concern about the Covid-19 Delta variant why it skips the annual meeting of cinema owners and Hollywood studios at Caesars Palace, according to a report by The Hollywood Reporter. Disney will be showing one of its upcoming films rather than giving a staged presentation.

The news comes almost a week later NATO has publicly condemned Disney’s day-and-date disclosure from “Black Widow”. It’s unclear if this was a factor in the studio’s decision.

Disney representatives were not immediately available for comment.

For a decade, CinemaCon has been a top-class event for studios, theater owners and the media to meet, network and exchange upcoming content and cinema innovations. However, the pandemic sidelined last year’s conference and could still affect this year’s event.

As of Friday, the other major studios are continuing their efforts to host personal presentations, although fewer stars are expected to be present during the four-day convention.

While NATO requires attendees to provide evidence of vaccination or a negative Covid test within 48 hours of the event, many in the film industry have raised concerns about the recent surge in coronavirus cases. There are rumors that other studios that weren’t there before Disney left may follow suit.

Last week the White House declared southern Nevada, which includes the city of Las Vegas, a “sustainable hotspot” for the virus. This means the area has a high number of cases and there is a risk that healthcare resources are limited.

Los Angeles County officials have warned residents not to travel to Nevada and Mask requirement for indoor areas reintroduced for all vaccinated and unvaccinated. Las Vegas doesn’t require tourists to wear masks indoors, however.

Representatives from the National Association of Theater Owners declined to comment.