Model Watch: Tv persona Sarah Lian lets her outfits do the speaking

Clothing is more than just vanity. Sarah Lian believes it can also work to complement a personality. She also sees fashion as a reflection of society and time.

The 38-year-old Malaysian gives a lot of thought to the choice of her outfits – be it with simple accessories like accessories or more serious things like a sustainable fashion choice.

Born in Taiping, Perak, and raised in Canada, Lian was active in film, television and theater. She is often seen here as a celebrity in the local scene at events (or as a hostess).

Continue reading: Style Watch: Malaysian artist Foo Bihzhu is larger than life when it comes to fashion

As for her aesthetic, she seems to prefer anything that can help her stand out.

From bold yet chic designs to comfy two-piece ensembles to exquisite red carpet dresses, Lian certainly knows how to rock a look. Maybe it’s more about their confidence than anything else.

While Lian likes to keep up with trends, she doesn’t think they define anyone’s style. In her opinion, fashion shouldn’t be a make or break factor in judging a person.

Curating a good OOTD (Outfit of the Day) is in the details, after all, and Lian is more demanding than most when it comes to striking that fine balance between effortless and beautifully polished looks.

What do you think of fashion? How does it affect life in general?

Fashion plays a big role in my life. In addition to studying fashion at university, I believe that it is an extension of your own personality. Fashion has always been a social commentary on society and the world we live in, and to me that sounds true. Since most of us were at home (during the pandemic), clothes like loungewear or fun “home” styles were more noticeable and common. It also showed that there wasn’t much room for pretexts as everyone had nowhere to go, we could all be more authentic. Also with sustainability in the foreground, I try to be a little more conscious when buying clothes. When I buy fast fashion, I make sure that I have pieces that last a long time and, to be honest, my favorite pieces have a long lifespan.

What does a typical Sarah Lian outfit look like?

I would probably describe my personal style as effortless, chic with a touch of boldness. I like to take risks while holding on to simple silhouettes that emphasize the curves on a woman’s body. A textured dress with a neckline or design detail paired with a pair of strappy sandals would likely be a signature Sarah Lian look.

If someone asks you for moderation suggestions, how would you respond?

Convenience is the key. If you are not comfortable in your own skin, everything you wear will look like you are drowning. Also, knowing your body type and finding ways to balance your appearance would be another aspect of dressing well, and if all fails, stick to the basics. Don’t make it too complicated! 4. Do you think everyone can be fashionable?

Continue reading: Style Watch: Singer-songwriter Zee Avi remains colorful Malaysian

I think anyone can be fashionable with the amount of attention and time they spend on fashion. Being up-to-date on the trends and the new collections or the spirit of each season can help you make better, more informed decisions about what you like and what you don’t like. That being said, you can still be fashionable if you stick to the basics, it’s all up to your interpretation.

What are your style essentials?

A pair of comfortable heels, rings or bracelets to add a little more detail to the outfit, and a great lipstick too.

ABQ monetary advisor: Ideas for speaking about cash along with your children, preventing in opposition to inflation

Danielle death co

Updated: September 27, 2021 8:51 am

Created: September 27, 2021 8:49 AM


ALBUQUERQUE, NM – Concerns about money is something many of us have experienced before, and rising inflation is making it more common. However, there are ways you can fight inflation and teach your children how to make good financial decisions.

David Hicks of the Oakmont Advisory Group discussed tips on every topic with Danielle Todesco on Monday morning.

She Stated, He Stated: Dad and mom pushing prenups and speaking cash along with your honey will be relationship stressor

Dear Lori and Jeff,

My boyfriend and I recently got engaged. We never really talked about finance and kept almost everything money-related separate. We share the cost of living even when we eat out. After the engagement, he told me that his parents insisted that I sign a prenuptial agreement as they seem to have a lot of fortune and so did he, unknown to me. He insists that he trusts me enough to marry me without a prenup and that everything his parents do. I’m a bit overwhelmed by the whole thing. It’s not that I’m against signing, I’m just not sure what it means and how it will affect our relationship.

Signed,

Prenup fear

Dear PA,

Lori and Jeff: There are actually three key themes in your question: how you should feel about getting married, your lack of communication about finances, and the blurred lines between your fiancé and his or her parents.

Lori: Marriages Are Increasingly Used in the US Millennials get married later in life after they have had time to amass some savings. In addition, many have divorced parents and are very conscious of the possibility of their marriage ending. Marriage advocates tend to separate the emotions of marriage from the business aspects of living together. They just see marriages as convenient. And yet I understand how being presented with one can sting. We want to believe that when we get married we will become a team of generosity and equality that will last forever. Marriage can emphasize “mine and yours” over “ours,” and when “yours” is significantly smaller, you may begin to hold grudges. If the marriage is going nowhere, changing your perspective can help. Instead of feeling it against you, remember that this man you love has what is rightfully his own.

Getting married can also be a great opportunity to find out how you deal with money as a couple. Before signing, make sure you have a common vision of finances over the long term. Take the time to sit together and explore:

• What feelings, fears and stories are associated with your handling of money?

• What are your current financial situations (savings, debts, spending patterns, goals)?

• What are your expectations of how each of you will contribute? What happens if a partner loses their job or falls ill? What if you decide to have children? Will either of you stay at home for a while and if so, how will this contribution be recognized financially?

• If you support your husband in his work, how will this be reflected in the event of a divorce?

• How are decisions about spending and saving made?

• What common goals would you like to plan (home, retirement, children, vacation, car)?

Jeff: One of the most significant dynamics we’ve found in our work with premarital couples is how their parents’ views and perspectives can affect the relationship. This is particularly clear when it comes to finance. Parents often throw in their opinions (both openly and passively-aggressive) and want what is best for their children. But when these preferences create conflict in the relationship, it is time to set stronger, healthier boundaries. The challenge is that it can feel like we are choosing between our parents and our partners, and our loyalty is often absolutely required. Your fiancé may feel trapped in this type of scenario of trying to please you, but also feeling pressure from his parents to grant her wishes.

With his situation in mind, there are some difficult questions you need to ask about your perception of his request. Do you feel like the two of you are on the same team, or does it feel like he’s on his parents’ side on issues related to money and financial planning? Do you feel like a priority and believe that he would be ready to challenge his parents to stand up for you and the relationship?

Jeff and Lori: Money is one of the top relationship killers and tends to get more deadly in silence. Now is the time to start thinking about what is getting in the way of talking about money and what each of you must do to have transparent conversations about how to proceed.

Lori and Jeff are married, licensed psychotherapists and couple-to-couple coaches at the Aspen Relationship Institute. Submit your relationship questions to info@AspenRelationshipCoaching.com and your query can be selected for a future column.

Speaking to college-bound teenagers about saving cash as we emerge from pandemic

(WTNH) – 2020 was a year of uncertainty for many families, both health and financial. Now that we get back to normal in mid-2021, let’s stretch your dollar by asking why do experts say this summer should be used as a college student learning experience.

The big lesson you need to learn now is your money and whether you were ready for the unexpected.

“One small mistake can add up and blemish your credit report for years,” said Nathan Grant, senior credit industry analyst at Credit Card Insider.

Grant said if people are back to work and have some normalcy we should spend this summer talking to our kids, especially those planning on going to college this fall.

“Whether you work from home or not, there will be a huge expense to consider. And if you already have debts, now is the time to take care of it. “

Teach them to develop responsible financial habits early in life. It will help you secure better loans and interest in the future, find a job, or rent an apartment.

Many of us shop more online. As you buy books and school supplies, explain why it is important to use a credit card instead of a debit card.

“With a credit card, it’s not your money that is at stake, but the lender. They take care of it immediately and fraud cases. Which is a debit card. This money will be debited from your account. You sometimes have to wait weeks to get this money back and that could affect other bills, especially during this pandemic.

Only spend what you can pay off in full so you don’t get into debt. And repeat the importance of saving a little bit of money each month in case something unexpected, like a pandemic, happens again.

Paying on time is another of the most important lessons you can teach your children, as late payments can stay on your credit report for up to seven years.

Youngsters and Cash: Because the pandemic will get worse, dad and mom prioritize speaking about cash with their youngsters [Column] | Cash

Believe me, talking to your child about money can be easy.

It mainly takes advantage of the plethora of everyday learning opportunities that occur in the serial aisles of grocery stores, sits in the TV commercial flash, searches pop-up ads online, and uses new or used cell phones. Will be bought. the mall.

But too many parents miss out on these opportunities, whether they have no faith in the subject or are not interested.

But something interesting happened during the pandemic. According to a recent study by Baltimore-based investment firm T. Rowe Price, parents have started talking more to their children about money.

In fact, T. RowePrice found that the percentage of parents who had money conversations with their children in the past year hit record levels during the pandemic process. The company launched its annual Kids & Money survey 13 years ago to examine the attitudes and behavior of parents and children towards money.

According to the latest survey of more than 2,000 parents and children between the ages of 8 and 14, 47% of parents discuss money problems with their children at least once a week during the pandemic. As of 2017, fund companies have stated that the percentage of families who regularly chat about money has never exceeded 35%. (The 2020 survey was almost complete in the early stages of the pandemic.)

What did parents and children talk about? Save money, establish the importance of not living beyond your own means, set financial goals and share how the pandemic has affected your daily cost of living. Of course, the family also provided information about the pandemic as often as they talked about their financial well-being.

Jerome Clark, Strategic Program Manager at T. Lowprice said:

The survey also found that families of all races had more money conversations with their families over the past year.

One point is to understand the clues your child is not giving their parents. The stressful situations that we have been through for over a year can be transformed into powerful teaching aids. A long-standing study by T. Rowe Price found that children who frequently talked about money to their parents became more financially responsible as they got older.

If talking about savings, expenses, goal setting, and other financial concepts isn’t your forte, there are numerous resources available online to get you started MoneyConfidentKids.com, T. A free educational resource created by RowePrice.

Parents should always be ready to ask their children about the worst things about money. Your questions can surprise you when you are least willing to answer.

When confronted with moments like this, I always say, “That’s an interesting question. Why do you ask? “It takes time to say something other than” yes “,” no “and” maybe “.

You may not have all the answers, but don’t worry. The fact that you are listening to your child’s questions may be enough to keep the conversation going.

Children and Money: As the pandemic worsens, it is very important for parents to talk to their children about money [Column] | money

Source link Children and Money: As the pandemic worsens, it is very important for parents to talk to their children about money [Column] | money

‘There’s extra disgrace in speaking about cash than intercourse’

Der tootin ‘.

“It’s more shameful to talk about money than sex,” claims Laura Dern.

Dern – whose “Big Little Lies” character Renata Klein Once said: “I will not be rich” – adds: “I cannot believe that no one has ever told me money. Nobody talked about it. Should you get a checking account? How do you save? Who do you talk to about it? “

Dern, 54, also loves that Renata’s line has become one of the series’ most iconic moments.

“I hope every woman says so,” she said during a Vanity Fair Cocktail Hour, Live! Chat with Vanity Fair’s Editor-in-Chief Radhika Jones.

“Little did I know it would resonate that way, and if it was a line that I ever said could resonate, I’m thrilled that it is because it’s obviously multilayered, and it’s not just about Finance goes. But how nice that women talk about money. “

The Oscar-winning actress, who began performing as a teenager, jokingly apologized for performing with her daughter Jaya TikTok videosand stated that her 16-year-old “would have killed me if I hadn’t given her at least a couple of TikToks. She asks me to do a TikTok most days so I try to speed myself up. “

And the “wild” actress called filming “Jurassic World: Dominion” during the COVID-19 pandemic “a very complicated and daunting consideration – going back to work at such a crucial and frightening moment and not wearing PPE at work to be able to act as an actor. “

The Vanity Fair Cocktail Hour, Live! is a virtual charity event in support of the Motion Picture & Television Fund’s COVID-19 relief efforts.