Hollywood is betting large on TikTok expertise in bid to woo Gen Z

In this photo illustration a TikTok logo seen displayed on a smartphone with stock market percentages in the background.

SOPA Images | LightRocket | Getty Images

When TikTok creator Boman Martinez-Reid first got an email from Creative Artists Agency he ignored it. As an Ontario native, he saw the acronym CAA and assumed it was CAA Insurance, a major car insurance company in Canada.

It was only after a TikTok representative contacted him that he realized he was being courted by one of Hollywood’s top talent agencies.

“I get a [direct message] from a guy at TikTok and he says let’s talk on the phone,” Martinez-Reid recalled. “So, we had a phone call and he asked me ‘I know that CAA has been reaching out to you. Do you know who they are? They represent Beyonce, Meryl Streep, you have to get on the phone with them.'”

Martinez-Reid, known online as “Bomanizer,” has more than 1.5 million followers and a budding career that includes a guest appearance on “Canada’s Drag Race” and a line of branded merchandise. While he rose to TikTok fame making reality show spoof videos, the 24-year-old has aspirations beyond the social media platform. He signed with CAA in July 2020.

Martinez-Reid is part of a growing list of content creators that have signed with traditional talent agencies, including dancer Charli D’Amelio, actress Addison Rae and the creators of the viral TikTok series “The Unofficial Bridgerton Musical,” Abigail Barlow and Emily Bear.

These artists have been tapped because of their talent, but also because of their engagement with online communities. These entrepreneurs have built large and loyal followings on the short-form video app, something talent managers and agents from traditional Hollywood firms see as a potential gold mine.

Not only can these agencies help build mini-media empires around these creators, they also can benefit from the strategies these digital influencers use, and apply it to bolster the careers of the agencies’ already established clients.

Actor Will Smith, who is repped by CAA, is just one example of an A-list celebrity who has embraced social media, including TikTok and YouTube, in recent years as a way to promote his content and to promote himself.

“Will recognized four or five years ago that young audiences are consuming media in a much different way,” said David Freeman, co-head of the CAA’s digital media division. “Will understood that he had to shift and change the way that he was interacting with his audience.”

This pivotal audience, which ranges in age from six to around 25, is known as Gen Z and is one of the most sought after consumer bases for companies. Not only is this young generation coming of age as consumers, but they are also driving major trends for older generations, said Jason Dorsey, president of the Center for Generational Kinetics, a research and strategic advisory firm.

“This makes this younger set of trendsetters overly valuable,” he said.

This generation is not just impacting entertainment, but apparel, food, technology and bigger social conversations, he said. 

“As Gen Z comes up, they really are the best predictor of the future,” Dorsey said. “Smart brands are trying to figure out how you connect with them in a sincere way. … If you win Gen Z, you can win everyone else.”

Embracing Gen Z

Dorsey noted that many brands missed out on connecting with the millennial generation because they dismissed this demographic’s adoption of mobile devices and social media and believed that this group of young consumers would return to the traditions of previous generations.

“That didn’t happen,” he said.

While the millennial generation adopted the internet and a mobile-first mentality, Gen Z has never known a time that they could not do almost everything they needed to do on a mobile device, said Connor Blakley, a marketing consultant and Gen Z expert.

“Everyone always says that Gen Z has a six- to eight-second attention span,” he said. “What that is is just a really good ‘BS meter’ for different kinds of information so that we can pick the thing that we really want to spend time on.”

Blakley, who is a member of Gen Z himself, has advised companies like Pepsi, Johnson & Johnson and the National Hockey League on social media marketing strategies. He noted that Gen Z is a generation that can easily discern when people and companies are being disingenuous.

“That’s why you are seeing talent agencies, marketing agencies, influencer agencies, all kinds of branding agencies going to TikTok because that is the place where Gen Z already is,” Dorsey added. “If you want to reach them, you have to go to where they are because you have virtually zero chance of getting them to where you are.”

TikTok, in particular, has been a place for talent agencies to cull new talent because of its rapid rise to popularity and the viral nature of its content. In fact, TikTok was the most popular website in 2021, surpassing even Google, according to data from Cloudflare, a web security and performance company.

The social media app, which launched internationally in 2017, rose to prominence in 2018, but really gained traction with consumers in late 2019 and during the coronavirus pandemic.

Movie theaters were shuttered, productions of popular TV shows were halted and the rate at which content was being released to the public slowed considerably. With so many people stuck at home, many turned to alternatives like TikTok for entertainment.

“Suddenly there was a pandemic,” Martinez-Reid said. “Everyone was stuck inside. I had nothing to do but to make content and everyone else had nothing to do but to watch content.”

Boman Martinez-Reid, known on TikTok as “Bomanizer,” is a content creator who was signed by talent agency CAA in July 2020.

Boman Martinez-Reid

For Martinez-Reid, TikTok was a creative outlet. He was one semester away from graduating from Ryerson University’s RTA Media Production program when the social media platform began to gain popularity. So, he decided to try his hand at content production.

“What do I have to lose? If I post something and it does well, great. If it does poorly, then no one will know,” he said.

His first TikTok was posted in December 2019 and centered around Martinez-Reid having a conversation with his last two brain cells about joining the social media platform.

“I was just basically shooting for this like overproduced, super scripted, try hard kind of edge, which at the time was not a thing on TikTok,” he said. “And I think that’s why my content started to do so well, because I started to get this comment that was like ‘I can’t believe that this is a TikTok’ and from then on it sort of just snowballed into more and more opportunities.”

Martinez-Reid has become known for his reality show spoof videos in which, alongside family and friends, he pokes fun at how cast members often get into feuds over the small things. He said that during the pandemic, while people were stuck inside, they could relate to tiny little frustrations bubbling over into big arguments.

While Martinez-Reid has yet to break into Hollywood, he’s used his relationship with CAA to meet with casting directors and story producers at various networks over the last 18 months. His goal is to gain more knowledge about the industry so he can make more strategic decisions about what projects he wants to sign on for in the future.

But there is a path for Martinez-Reid, one that was first forged more than a decade ago by content creators on YouTube and the now defunct video platform Vine.

‘Talent is talent’

Over the last decade, CAA has helped content creators from nontraditional platforms make the transition to Hollywood. The group reps Tyler Blevins, aka Ninja, who rose to fame streaming himself playing video games. While Blevins continues to play video games professionally, he has also participated in Fox’s “The Masked Singer” and had a cameo appearance in Disney’s “Free Guy.”

The talent agency also represents Arif Zahir, who gained notoriety for his impressions posted on YouTube, and now voices Cleveland Brown on Fox’s “Family Guy.”

Other notable celebrities that have risen from this space include CAA-signed Justin Bieber, who was discovered by Usher and Scooter Braun and became a Grammy Award-winning artist; Liza Koshy, who also signed with CAA and now voices Zipp Storm on the “My Little Pony: A New Generation” TV show; and Bo Burnham, who is represented by United Talent Agency, went from making comedy YouTube videos, to writing, directing and starring in top Hollywood films.

“Talent is talent,” said Frank Jung, who launched CAA’s digital media division almost a decade ago alongside Freeman. “If they are an amazing talent, that’s just number one.”

TikTok is still a relatively new platform and has yet to produce the same number of Hollywood success stories as YouTube has in the last decade, but experts predict it won’t be long until its making a mark on the film and television industry.

Already we’ve seen the rise of Addison Rae, 21, who secured a multimillion dollar deal with Netflix in September after starring in the streamer’s film “He’s All That,” a sequel to 1999’s “She’s All That.” She is represented by William Morris Endeavor Entertainment and currently has more than 86 million followers on TikTok.

And, of course, Charli D’Amelio, 17, who touts a following more than 133 million strong on the social media platform, has partnered with brands like hummus maker Sabra, Procter & Gamble and Dunkin and now has her own docuseries on Hulu. D’Amelio is repped by UTA.

Then there is Maggie Thurmon, who rose to fame on the social media app dancing and performing circus tricks with her father Dan. The 19-year-old was signed by UTA in February 2020 before she hit 1 million followers on the platform.

Now, she has more than 5 million followers, a popular podcast called “Mags and Dad’s Wholesome Chaos” and just wrapped her first feature film “The Other Zoey,” which features Andie MacDowell and Heather Graham.

“I’m auditioning at the moment,” Thurmon told CNBC just hours after finishing up on set. “I’m so excited for the possibilities of acting in the future. If I can do this for the rest of my life, I would just be the happiest person on the planet.”

Thurmon said she was “greatly surprised” when she announced to her TikTok following earlier this month that she would be pursuing acting alongside her burgeoning social media career.

“I prepared for the backlash,” she said. “But I did not find one negative comment on the TikTok announcement or Instagram post.”

Thurmon’s experience is not unique. “What we see is that Gen Z influencers on TikTok have built meaningful followings and have a built-in audience of fans that feel a personal connection to the creator and want to be more supportive,” Dorsey said. “They feel like that are going along with them on the project.”

That’s one reason these content creators have clout among Hollywood agencies looking to sign fresh talent.

‘Data is the new oil’

“The unique thing is not only being able to identify talent, but this talent already comes with a built-in audience,” CAA’s Freeman said. “Through social media and these platforms, there is a direct conversation that is happening between talent and audience.”

For Jung and Freeman, these audiences provide much needed data about what people want to consume for content and who they want to see make that content.

“Data is the new oil,” Jung said. “What we are trying to do is make sure we are amplifying these voices and eventually creating media businesses for the clients, which will leave lasting legacies.”

“And also everyone can make some money,” he added with a laugh.

Not only can these agencies help build mini-media empires around these creators, they also can benefit from the strategies these digital influencers use, and apply it to bolster the careers of the agencies’ already established clients.

Smith, who has been campaigning for a best actor nomination at this year’s Academy Awards for his role in Warner Bros.’ “King Richard,” is a prime example of a traditional CAA client who has used social media to jumpstart the next phase of his career.

Freeman said that much of the actor’s learnings and best practices came from Koshy, who taught him that his social media videos didn’t need to be perfect, well-produced videos, they just needed to be authentic and give audiences a peek behind the curtain into his life.

Smith started his own YouTube channel in 2017, posting vlog-style videos about his life alongside curated series. 2018’s “The Jump” focused on Smith’s preparation to bungee jump out of a helicopter over the Grand Canyon for his 50th birthday, while 2021’s “Best Shape of My Life” centered on the actor’s journey to improve his personal fitness.

More recently, he has posted videos of himself training alongside Miami Dolphins quarterback Tua Tagovailoa, quizzing his young costars from “King Richard” about his career and explaining how he went about recording his audiobook.

Actor Will Smith takes a selfie at the UK Premiere of “King Richard” at The Curzon Mayfair on November 17, 2021 in London, England.

Samir Hussein | WireImage | Getty Images

“His career was colder than it had been,” Dan Weinstein, of Underscore Talent, said. “I wouldn’t say it was nonexistent, but he was not the ‘Independence Day’ blockbuster draw he was. He found new audiences. He reinvented his persona around his celebrity. There’s no denying the fact that he is an insanely creative, talented, charismatic individual and he’s leveraging that to breathe new life into all of his endeavors.”

In the last five years, Smith has starred in major blockbusters like Warner Bros.’ “Suicide Squad” and Disney’s “Aladdin,” reestablishing himself as a force at the box office.

And Smith isn’t the only celebrity following this path. Dwayne Johnson, Ryan Reynolds, Taylor Swift, Jennifer Lopez and more have embraced social media as a way to connect with fans and promote their work.

Jung and Freeman’s digital media division of CAA has been devised as a place to meld the best practices of the traditional Hollywood model with the strategies of grassroots entrepreneurial content creators. In doing so, their team can take already established talent and reinvigorate their careers. They can also take up-and-coming talent, like Martinez-Reid, and build from an already sturdy foundation.

Martinez-Reid is still forging his path and CAA isn’t rushing him.

“That’s why I love CAA,” Martinez-Reid said. “Because they see me as a talented creator who will have a career. It’s not just about quick jobs. It’s about shaping what my next 10 years are going to look like.”

KLA faucets prime expertise for a Silicon Valley profession — Nice Lakes fashion

The construction of a second headquarters gave KLA the ability to prioritize inclusion and diversity when hiring new employees. An important part of KLA’s inclusion and diversity strategy are Employee Resource Groups (ERGs) – a collective of employees who come together with common interests in diversity. KLA ERGs include Women In STEM Empowered (WISE), Konexión, Black Employees Leading Excellence, Inclusion, Values ​​and Education (BELIEVE) and Mosaic. The Mosaic ERG originated in KLA’s Ann Arbor site and is a diverse group of employees who work together to create a culture of belonging through a multitude of people Inclusion and diversity activities. The aim of Mosaic is to use the diversity of backgrounds, experiences and points of view of KLA employees.

The opening of Ann Arbor’s headquarters comes at a crucial turning point for workplace and employee culture. In the midst of the rising talent war and changing employee expectations, KLA continues to improve its “whole person” approach, which focuses on development and empowerment, believing that every person naturally wants and will be successful. when the right environment and the opportunity to play to their strengths. Rather than building its recruitment program solely on experience, skills or degrees, KLA looks for attitude, intelligence and curiosity as the basic raw materials for success.

Jeff Bezos’ Blue Origin shedding high expertise throughout NASA lander battle

Jeff Bezos, owner of Blue Origin, unveils a new lunar module called the Blue Moon during an event at the Washington Convention Center on May 9, 2019 in Washington, DC.

Mark Wilson | Getty Images

Jeff Bezos flew into space late last month, but his company has lost top talent since the billionaire space founder returned to Earth.

At least 17 key executives and senior engineers left Blue Origin this summer, CNBC learned, and many will follow suit in the weeks to Bezos’ space travel.

Two of the engineers, Nitin Arora and Lauren Lyons, have announced jobs at other space companies this week: Elon Musks SpaceX and Firefly aerospace, respectively.

Others have been quietly updating their LinkedIn pages over the past few weeks.

Any unannounced departure has been confirmed to CNBC by people familiar with the matter. Those departures include: Steve Bennett, Senior Vice President of New Shepard, Jeff Ashby, Head of Mission Assurance (who has retired), Scott Jacobs, Sales Director for National Security, Bob Ess, Senior Director of New Glenn, Tod Byquist , Senior Director of the First Tier of New Glenn, Senior Finance of New Glenn Manager Bill Scammell, Senior Manager of Production Testing Christopher Payne, New Shepard Technical Project Manager Nate Chapman, Senior Propulsion Design Engineer Dave Sanderson, Senior HLS Human Factors Engineer Rachel Forman, BE-4 Controller Lead Integration and Testing Engineer Jack Nelson, New Shepard Lead Avionics Software Engineer Huong Vo, BE-7 Avionics Hardware Engineer Aaron Wang, Propulsion Engineer Rex Gu, and Rocket Engine Development Engineer Gerry Hudak.

Those who announced they were leaving Blue Origin didn’t say why, but frustration with management and a slow, bureaucratic structure are often cited in employee reviews on the Glassdoor job site.

A company spokesperson highlighted Blue Origin’s growth in a statement to CNBC.

“Blue Origin grew by 850 employees in 2020 and we have grown another 650 in 2021 so far. In fact, we’ve almost quadrupled in the past three years. We continue to occupy important management positions in manufacturing. , Quality, engine design and vehicle design. We are building a team and we have great talent, “said the spokesman.

Some of the retired engineers were part of Blue Origin’s astronaut lunar lander program. Bezos’ company lost its bid for a valuable NASA development contract in April when SpaceX was announced as the only award winner under the Space Agency’s Human Landing System program, receiving a $ 2.9 billion contract.

But even though the Government Accountability Office last month rejected Blue Origin’s protest against NASA’s decision, the company has further escalated its fight to participate in the HLS program. Blue Origin launched for the first time a PR offensive against SpaceX’s Starship Missile and then NASA sued in federal court on Monday.

A $ 10,000 bonus

Jeff Bezos pops champagne after emerging from the New Shepard capsule after his space flight on July 20, 2021.

Blue origin

The company has nearly 4,000 employees in the United States, with headquarters in Kent, Washington, near Seattle, and offices in Cape Canaveral, Florida; Van Horn, Texas; and Huntsville, Alabama.

Ten days after Bezos’ space flight on July 20, Blue Origin gave all of its full-time employees an unconditional cash bonus of $ 10,000, several people familiar with the situation told CNBC. None of Blue Origin’s contractors received it. The company confirmed the bonus, with a spokesperson saying it was intended as a “thank you” for reaching the milestone of getting humans into space.

Two people told CNBC that the bonus was perceived internally as an attempt by corporate management to persuade talent to stay in response to the number of employees who filed resignations after the introduction.

A look at Glassdoor reveals a marked difference in employee satisfaction with the leadership of Blue Origin compared to that of other leading space companies. According to Glassdoor, only 15% of Blue Origin employees approve of CEO Bob Smith – up from 91% for Elon Musk at SpaceX or 77% for Tory Bruno at the United Launch Alliance.

The HLS fight

A model of the crew lander at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in August 2020.

Blue origin

NASA’s Human Landing System program is one of the critical parts of the agency’s plan, known as Artemis, to return US astronauts to the lunar surface.

Last year NASA awarded nearly $ 1 billion in concept development contracts for HLS – SpaceX received $ 135 million, Read‘Subsidiary Dynetics receives $ 253 million and Blue Origin receives $ 579 million. The space agency then expected to award two of these three companies for hardware development contracts this year. However, after a lack of requested funding for HLS from Congress, NASA decided to only give SpaceX a contract worth about $ 2.9 billion.

Blue Origin and Dynetics each quickly filed protests with the US Government Accountability Office, which stopped NASA’s work on the program until the protests could be resolved. GAO confirmed NASA’s decision on July 30th. On August 16, Blue Origin went one step further, sue NASA in federal court.

NASA has paid $ 300 million of its SpaceX contract to date, with payment being made on the day GAO declined to protest. However, the space agency’s work on HLS has again been suspended – this time due to Blue Origin’s lawsuit, according to court records on Thursday – and will not resume until November 1.

Big delays

Billionaire businessman Jeff Bezos will launch with three crew members aboard a New Shepard missile on the world’s first unattended suborbital flight from Blue Origin Launch Site 1 near Van Horn, Texas on July 20, 2021.

Joe Skipper | Reuters

Blue Origin has struggled to execute several large programs since Bezos hired Smith as CEO in 2017. Bezos founded the company in 2000 with the aim of “creating a future where millions of people in space live and work to help the earth”. Delays – although common in the industry where the adage “space is tough” is persistently heard – have pushed Bezos’ vision back. highlighted by the departure of Blue Origin’s Chief Operating Officer late last year.

Bezos launched to the edge of space as one of the members of the first crew aboard the reusable New Shepard rocket. Although the company didn’t disclose pricing, New Shepard is competing with it Virgo galactic in suborbital space tourism, with Blue Origin selling nearly $ 100 million worth of tickets for future passenger flights. Although New Shepard’s first crewed launch was a resounding success, Blue Origin leadership had previously expected the rocket to begin human launching by the end of 2017.

An artist’s illustration of a New Glenn rocket on the launch pad in Florida.

Blue origin

BE-4 engine test at Blue Origin launch facility in West Texas.

Blue origin

Blue Origin’s third major program is its stable rocket engine, led by the BE-4, which will propel its New Glenn rocket. The company previously said its BE-4 engines would be “ready to fly in 2017”.

However, four years later, development issues and a lack of hardware for testing mean Blue Origin has not yet shipped its first aircraft engines. ArsTechnica reports earlier this month. The company is pushing to have two BE-4 engines ready by the end of this year. BE-4s in particular are important beyond Blue Origin because ULA signed a contract to use the engines to power their Vulcan missilesPrefer Blue Origin Aerojet Rocketdyne as its supplier. ULA is pushing to have its first Vulcan rocket ready for launch by the end of this year, and Blue Origin’s BE-4 engines are expected to be one – if not the – last piece to be added before launch.

Bezos has spent most of the time focusing on over the past two decades Amazonbut on the way has steadily sold parts of its stake in the tech giant to Fund the development of Blue Origin – to the $ 1 billion a year, or possibly more. Last month, Bezos resigned as CEO of Amazon, with many in the space industry expecting him to focus more on his space business.

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New leisure firm seeks native expertise | Existence



owensby

OWENSBY

A new entertainment and production company is seeking to leverage talent in Kokomo to host a range of performances for the community, from plays and concerts to films and music videos.

The company, O Entertainments & Productions, is the brainchild of Earvin Owensby, who recently moved to Kokomo from Indianapolis to be closer to the family. Now he wants to help make the City of Firsts a Mecca for the arts.

“I hope it will draw attention to Kokomo, which is family-oriented fun for music and entertainment. I hope to promote Kokomo as a place to go and bring your family, such as comedy shows, and that companies here can sponsor some of those events, ”he said.

Owensby said he grew up in a large family of musicians and singers and that he always “wanted to do something to make music and filmmaking better”. He said he had always been fascinated with the production world and tried his hand at screenwriting and film projects about four years ago. Now he hopes to increase that by bringing local talent on stage and behind the camera.

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Although Owensby doesn’t have a stationary location yet, he has his eye on a few spots and hopes one will soon become the home of O Entertainments & Production.

He is currently working on a biblical film project called “One Touch”, is planning a city-wide post-COVID concert in the fall and is looking for musicians of all genres. He also hopes to bring the red carpet experience to Kokomo by hosting film premieres from independent filmmakers.

“We hope to bring more events to the community, such as stage arts, plays and concerts,” he said.

Further information and trailers from O Entertainments can be found at o-entertainments.com. Those interested in becoming a part of O Entertainments and Productions can contact Owensby at oeandproductions@gmail.com. He is looking for actors, musicians, comedians, singers and writers.

Summer season Arts Competition celebrated the land of Umpqua’s artistic expertise | Leisure

Mimi Ryan will host a booth at the Summer Arts Festival this year where she will host a community art project that will be placed in school gardens across the county. Ryan is an AmeriCorps member who oversees the Umpqua Valley Farm to School and the Blue Zones Project Umpqua. She has worked on setting up school gardens at Fir Grove, Winchester and Green Elementary Schools. “We are hosting a community gardening art activity at our booth where community members of all ages can come and paint their own round pieces of wood,” said Ryan. “When the festival is over, each of these hand-painted pieces will be pieced together into larger pieces that will be hung in the school gardens we work with at Green, Winchester, and Fir Grove elementary schools.” She tries to make sure the project is on a seasonal garden theme so that every school has works of art dedicated to what grows in autumn, winter, spring and summer. “We’re really excited to see what our community can do,” said Ryan. Ryan’s booth at the Summer Arts Festival will be one of many, as more than 130 local and regional artists are expected to offer handcrafted work, art projects, demonstrations and entertainment. The Summer Arts Festival returns for a three-day weekend in late June this year to celebrate the creative talent of the Umpqua country with thousands of visitors. The event will take place in Fir Grove Park on June 25th from 12pm to 9pm, on June 26th from 10am to 9pm and on June 27th from 10am to 4pm. This is the 52nd annual celebration of the arts in the Umpqua Valley. hosted by Umpqua Valley Arts. There will be a special kids’ zone with activities for the youngest art enthusiasts in the area. Art vendors’ stands close at 8:00 p.m. Friday and Saturday, while the food court and main stage are open until 9:00 p.m. Entry is $ 5; Children under six are free. Family passes valued at $ 15 are also available. visit

Sanne Godfrey can be reached at sgodfrey@nrtoday.com or 541-957-4203. Follow her on Twitter @sannegodfrey.

Bay Shore Church Kids Choir Looking For Expertise | Leisure

Bay Shore Church invites children of all ages to join the Bay Shore Church Children’s Choir every Sunday after services from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m.

All participating children will sing, rehearse the scriptures, practice speaking, and learn how to prepare sets, costumes, and props for upcoming worship songs and biannual musicals.

Due to health and safety guidelines, the choir is currently using the Zoom platform for weekly rehearsals and preparing virtual videos for weekly online church services.

“Not only do the children gain confidence, poise, and increased vocal skills, but they also learn lifelong lessons by portraying Biblical stories musically and through their artwork,” said Julie Ramsey, music director. ”

For more information, call 562-433-0401. The Bay Shore Church is located at Belmont Shore, 5100 E. The Toledo.

cutNscratch: Roanoke music scene remembers Danny Counts expertise, humor | Leisure

Swing joined Counts in the late 1970s as part of Forbert’s band to go on tour following the success of Forbert’s single “Romeo’s Tune”. Watch them with Forbert on the BBC2 show “The Old Gray Whistle Test” below youtu.be/eu_oTh04u3c.

Swing said Thursday that he and Counts teamed up through B. Kliban Comics, Frank Zappa, Captain Beefheart. The Shaggs, Lord Buckley and other art out of the norm. They treated listening as an art.

“We got into really old, obscure, crazy, almost twisted things. … The more we heard The Shaggs, the more we realized that as bad as it was, absolutely bad. “

But on stage, their music and friendship were deeply rooted.

“He was a stand-up guy,” said Swing. “He was as honest as the day was long. Good times, bad times, he was there. “

He added: “The level of Danny, his excellent musicality, his humility and who he was as a person were inextricably linked.”

Counts’ always flowing bass lines, which only needed the bare essentials – delivered with archetypal, electric sound – also brought him the Bromberg appearance. This band nicknamed him “The Fuzzy Pumper” after the Play Doh toy that radiated “hair” made of clay.

Volition Leisure Provides Luna Clever As Expertise Supervisor – Deadline

Volition entertainment has hired film and television managers Luna Wise as the newest addition.

Wise joins Volition as a Los Angeles Talent Manager under founder Ami Manning, bringing with her a roster of 25 aspiring actors who have appeared in numerous major studio films and network television shows. She will also be involved in the subsidiary of Volition Entertainment Dragonfly productionsat the end of development support in the production of film and television projects with and without a script.

Wise began her career in the industry as an agency intern with Keiko Nakamura in Tokyo before moving up in the youth business department. After returning to the US, Wise switched to talent management.

Wise is extremely passionate about bridging the gap between Hollywood and its underrepresented and diverse actors and storytellers. She hopes to put an emphasis on inclusive attitudes in industry leadership roles and the immediate need for more green light under the leadership of POC.

In the title role, Wise will produce an upcoming drama about the life of Elizabeth Hudson Smith, starring actress Nadine Jackson. The script was written by Gus Edwards, a famous playwright, writer and notable member of the Negro Ensemble Company.

Appalachian Arts & Leisure Awards search to honor expertise of area | Information

The aim of the first Appalachian Arts & Entertainment Awards, which will air in March, is to highlight the diverse talent of the Appalachian region.

However, the public may have the choice of determining the winners of the competition by getting involved macarts.com on February 2nd to have a say in the selection of top performers and artists in eight categories.

Jill Hamlin, assistant director of fine arts at Mountain Arts Center, was in London last week to promote the talent competition and encourage local residents to vote for the winners in each category. It was featured in Forcht Broadcasting (SAM 103.9 FM and WNAV 96.7 FM) to explain the award program and encourage other artisans in the Appalachian region to make their selections for the event next year.

“The awards program is like the Grammys – we have musicians, dancers, singers and great hosts,” said Hamlin. “We picked the top 5 in each category and these range from the best radio DJ to the best tattoo artist.”

The top 5 finalists in each category will be announced on February 2nd and those who tune in can vote for their favorite entrant for the People’s Choice Award.

These finalists submitted their entries, with the winners being selected by popular vote. They are then put before a jury who are experts in their various fields. Judges are selected from Boston, Los Angeles, Florida, and other areas. The fields were narrowed down from 1,200 submissions. Other categories include photography, painting, sculpture, dance education, music educator, singers, authors, original songwriters, short films, radio and television personalities, high school bands and college bands. The musical selection varies from bluegrass to punk, from Americana to country and rock, gospel and reggae.

“We have categories for all types of music, art, writing, photography, music educators, and video production,” she added. “We just really want to shed light on ourselves and our heritage.”

Hamlin said the awards are a partnership between the Mountain Arts Center and the Big Sandy Community and Technical College. Tickets for the award program could be bought when visiting the Mountainartscenter or macarts.com.

“We have so much talent here and so often do we have that stigma of being uneducated and unrefined,” said Hamlin. “We want to show the talent of the people in this area – Appalachia is so often associated with Kentucky, Virginia and West Virginia, but the Appalachian Mountains actually stretch from New York to Mississippi and Alabama.”

The Appalachian Mountains actually extend into 13 states, from southern New York to Pennsylvania, to western and south Ohio, eastern Kentucky, West Virginia, eastern Virginia, central Tennessee, eastern North Carolina, and northeast South Carolina , Northern Georgia and Central Alabama and Northwest Mississippi.

“Appalachia is just one of many cultures, but the purpose of the awards – called APPYs – is to make us proud of who we are and proud of our art,” continued Hamlin. “Often times we feel we have no voice and we hope this inspires artists in the region to be proud of their legacy.”

Hamlin said the stereotype that is often imposed on people in the area is negative.

“Movies like ‘Liberation’ and ‘O brother, where are you?’ Don’t do us a favor, “she said. “The documentaries from a few years ago, where people in the area were labeled ‘Mountain Dew Mouth’, didn’t help either. We want to highlight our heritage. We have so many resources here – we make our own clothes, we do pull on our own food. If the technology were turned off, we would survive. “

This strength, she said, makes the people of this region resilient and resourceful.

“We have always taken care of each other, including our worst enemy. We would help them if they were hurt,” she added. “Appalachia nourishes the heart and soul. We are givers, we are educators and we want to emphasize who we are.”

Hamlin added that the organizers hope to expand the categories even further over the next year and encouraged artisans to submit their work. To do this, visit appalachianartsandentertainmentawards.com and fill out an online form to submit your listing. Artists can submit their work or be nominated.

For more information, visit the Mountain Arts Center at (606) 886-2623 or visit the website at macarts.com. The actual award ceremony will take place on March 20th at 7pm in the Mountain Arts Center. Tickets cost $ 25 to $ 40 each. Anyone wishing to attend events in person is asked to wear masks.

njohnson@sentinel-echo.com

Appalachian Arts & Leisure Awards search to honor expertise of area | Information

The aim of the first Appalachian Arts & Entertainment Awards, which will air in March, is to highlight the diverse talent of the Appalachian region.

However, the public may have the choice of determining the winners of the competition by getting involved macarts.com on February 2nd to have a say in the selection of top performers and artists in eight categories.

Jill Hamlin, assistant director of fine arts at Mountain Arts Center, was in London last week to promote the talent competition and encourage local residents to vote for the winners in each category. It was featured in Forcht Broadcasting (SAM 103.9 FM and WNAV 96.7 FM) to explain the award program and encourage other artisans in the Appalachian region to make their selections for the event next year.

“The awards program is like the Grammys – we have musicians, dancers, singers and great hosts,” said Hamlin. “We picked the top 5 in each category and these range from the best radio DJ to the best tattoo artist.”

The top 5 finalists in each category will be announced on February 2nd and those who tune in can vote for their favorite entrant for the People’s Choice Award.

These finalists submitted their entries, with the winners being selected by popular vote. They are then put before a jury who are experts in their various fields. Judges are selected from Boston, Los Angeles, Florida, and other areas. The fields were narrowed down from 1,200 submissions. Other categories include photography, painting, sculpture, dance education, music educator, singers, authors, original songwriters, short films, radio and television personalities, high school bands and college bands. The musical selection varies from bluegrass to punk, from Americana to country and rock, gospel and reggae.

“We have categories for all types of music, art, writing, photography, music educators, and video production,” she added. “We just really want to shed light on ourselves and our heritage.”

Hamlin said the awards are a partnership between the Mountain Arts Center and the Big Sandy Community and Technical College. Tickets for the award program could be bought when visiting the Mountainartscenter or macarts.com.

“We have so much talent here and so often do we have that stigma of being uneducated and unrefined,” said Hamlin. “We want to show the talent of the people in this area – Appalachia is so often associated with Kentucky, Virginia and West Virginia, but the Appalachian Mountains actually stretch from New York to Mississippi and Alabama.”

The Appalachian Mountains actually extend into 13 states, from southern New York to Pennsylvania, to western and south Ohio, eastern Kentucky, West Virginia, eastern Virginia, central Tennessee, eastern North Carolina, and northeast South Carolina , Northern Georgia and Central Alabama and Northwest Mississippi.

“Appalachia is just one of many cultures, but the purpose of the awards – called APPYs – is to make us proud of who we are and proud of our art,” continued Hamlin. “Often times we feel we have no voice and we hope this inspires artists in the region to be proud of their legacy.”

Hamlin said the stereotype that is often imposed on people in the area is negative.

“Movies like ‘Liberation’ and ‘O brother, where are you?’ Don’t do us a favor, “she said. “The documentaries from a few years ago, where people in the area were labeled ‘Mountain Dew Mouth’, didn’t help either. We want to highlight our heritage. We have so many resources here – we make our own clothes, we do pull on our own food. If the technology were turned off, we would survive. “

This strength, she said, makes the people of this region resilient and resourceful.

“We have always taken care of each other, including our worst enemy. We would help them if they were hurt,” she added. “Appalachia nourishes the heart and soul. We are givers, we are educators and we want to emphasize who we are.”

Hamlin added that the organizers hope to expand the categories even further over the next year and encouraged artisans to submit their work. To do this, visit appalachianartsandentertainmentawards.com and fill out an online form to submit your listing. Artists can submit their work or be nominated.

For more information, visit the Mountain Arts Center at (606) 886-2623 or visit the website at macarts.com. The actual award ceremony will take place on March 20th at 7pm in the Mountain Arts Center. Tickets cost $ 25 to $ 40 each. Anyone wishing to attend events in person is asked to wear masks.

njohnson@sentinel-echo.com