Walmart ought to be beneath tighter scrutiny due to firing of worker with Down syndrome, EEOC says

Exterior view of a Walmart store on August 23, 2020 in North Bergen, New Jersey. Walmart saw profits jump last quarter as e-commerce sales soared during the coronavirus pandemic.

Press DISPLAY | Corbis News | Getty Images

A jury found Walmart broken the law when it laid off a longtime employee with Down syndrome. Now the US Equal Employment Commission wants the judge to announce the largest private employer in the country to prevent this.

In a motion filed on Friday, the federal agency said Walmart should be under stricter supervision for the next five years and clarify in company policies that employees with disabilities are entitled to reasonable accommodation.

Also, according to the EEOC, Walmart should be forced to post a placard about the lawsuit and its actions in more than 100 stores. A draft of the memo, which the EEOC created and shared with the judge, sets out why the company was wrong in firing a longtime employee – Marlo Spaeth – and uses it as a cautionary story about the consequences of violating the Americans with Disabilities Act.

The federal agency is demanding that the memo be posted for five years in the region where Walmart violated the ADA.

A judge ultimately decides whether or not the interim measures will be issued.

Walmart is reviewing the filing, company spokesman Randy Hargrove said.

In a previous statement, he said that Walmart executives and managers “take the support of all of our employees seriously and routinely take in thousands each year for people with disabilities”.

Marlo Spaeth (left) was fired from Walmart in July 2015 after working there for nearly 16 years. Her sister Amy Jo Stevenson has since been in litigation with the retail giant. She filed a discrimination complaint with the US Equal Opportunities Commission.

Amy Jo Stevenson

The EEOC and Walmart were Involved in litigation for Spaeth’s release for years. Spaeth, who has Down syndrome, worked for nearly 16 years as a sales rep at a Walmart Supercenter in Manitowoc, a small town in eastern Wisconsin on the shores of Lake Michigan. She was fired from her job after the store implemented a new computerized planning system that changed its opening hours. Managers refused to restore Spaeth’s long-standing work schedule.

Walmart in July lost the lawsuit and was asked by the jury to pay more than $ 125 million in judgment – one of the highest in federal agency history for a single victim. The judge reduced the damages to $ 300,000, the maximum legal limit.

In Friday’s motion, the EEOC said Walmart should pay nearly $ 187,000 on top of that damage to make up for Spaeth’s years of lost wages. It asked the judge to require Walmart to reinstate Spaeth as an employee or to pay the equivalent of ten years’ wages in lieu of reinstatement.

However, the federal agency also argued that monetary damages payments are not enough. It called for the strictest supervision of Walmart – and the signs put up – in the area where Spaeth’s business is located. The region has more than a hundred stores, according to one of the EEOC filings, but it hasn’t specified which states and cities it covers outside of this part of Wisconsin.

In this region, Walmart should require ADA training for all managers and supervisors and include compliance with these guidelines in annual performance reviews. Walmart should also be required to notify the EEOC within 90 days of any request for consideration of an employee’s disability and provide details of that request, including the person’s name and contact information, and Walmart’s response.

The EEOC’s application corresponds to the wishes of Spaeth’s sister Amy Jo Stevenson.

In an interview with CNBC In July she said her sister was shattered when she lost her job. Stevenson said she wants all Walmart employees and managers to know what happened to her sister – and understand her rights and requirements under the ADA.

“I imagine there is a memo from Marlo Spaeth in every Walmart that says, ‘You can’t do that,’” said Stevenson.

Minnesota dad slicing his hair to lift cash for Rett Syndrome analysis

items

Chuck Evert grew his hair during the pandemic and will now cut his locks as part of a fundraiser for Rett Syndrome research.

Chuck Evert has been growing his hair for 14 months. While joking that it is primarily about teasing his wife, he adds that forced closings due to the pandemic have also played a role.

His long hair has allowed him to transform himself into some of the best in pop culture, including Chuck “Doc Brown” Evert, who resembles the fictional character from the “Back to the Future” series, and “Chuck The Sequel Evert” – a Piece from the movie “Dumb and Dumber.”

Faribault’s father’s funny haircuts help raise money for the children’s hospital

A Faribault dad’s fun haircuts are more than just a way to break the pandemic blues. He used his hair to raise money for Gillette Children’s Hospital.

His family and friends are fed up with the longer hair, but Evert says he didn’t want to cut it off for nothing.

“It was my wife’s idea,” he told FOX 9. “I told her the stuff had to go because it was getting warm. She said, ‘Maybe we should do a fundraiser.'”

Now he’s raising money in honor of his daughter, who was diagnosed with Rett Syndrome at the age of two. Rett syndrome is a rare genetic neurological disorder that affects a child’s development. It affects 1 in 10,000 women and is even less common in men, according to the International Rett Syndrome Foundation.

“There are roughly 8,000 cases in the United States,” Evert wrote online for the fundraiser called Chucks Cut For Rett. “The gene in question plays a key role in the development of babies. If this gene cannot function properly, the child will not be able to reach their milestones. This means that my daughter is non-verbal, has no specific hand skills, and cannot be helped can go.”

The money raised will go to Gillette Children’s Specialty Healthcare in Saint Paul – a very special hospital for the Everts.

“You’re a big part of our family,” said Evert. “It’s like a family reunion instead of going to the doctor.”

When the Everts daughter was diagnosed in 2000, Evert said the only clinic in the United States that specializes in Rett Syndrome is Baylor University in Texas. Today it is known as the only one of 14 hospitals operated by the Right Syndrome Foundation.

“Gillette is a center of excellence for Rett Syndrome. You have been here our entire trip since our daughter is now 23,” he said.

Evert told his family that if he raised $ 2,000 he would cut his hair. The word got around and he raised four times that amount and now has more than $ 8,600 to donate to the hospital.

And while he loses what he calls the “man bun,” he gains so much more for research for children like his daughter.

“I can’t say enough about the people who supported us,” said Evert emotionally. “It’s pretty cool.”

The big haircut is on July 1st at 6:15 p.m. You can watch it live on Facebook.