Summer time’s again! Here is all of the enjoyable coming to Nebraska in 2021 | Leisure

Summer fun is in the stars, the stadiums, the swimming pools, the parks and the pavilions this year.

After a tough stretch, we’re ready to do all the things we couldn’t do in 2020.

» If festivals are your thing, you’ll be busy every weekend, starting with Taste of Omaha.

» Musicals are returning to suburban stages: “The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee” will be at the Papillion-La Vista Community Theatre and “The Addams Family” will be in Ralston.

» The College World Series is back at full capacity. There’s nothing like a night at the ballpark. And don’t forget the Olympic Swim Trials.

» The schedule is filled with moonlight concerts on lush lawns (or artificial turf, in the case of country superstar Garth Brooks, who plays Memorial Stadium at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln on Aug. 14). Other acts coming to the area include Blake Shelton, Dashboard Confessional and Melissa Etheridge.

» Gallery hopping is one of the best ways to discover local and regional artists. Our listing makes it easy.

» Looking for adventure? Immerse yourself in a deep sea adventure with James Cameron as your guide. Love baseball? Get to know the greatest Black players of all time.

Get ready for all that and so much more in Nebraska this summer. Here’s what you need to know to stay on the go. The pace is up to you.



Summer fun

All the summer fun coming to Nebraska may keep you up in the clouds. 



Summer fun: Check out these Nebraska fairs & festivals making a comeback after COVID

Summer fun: Here's what's playing on live stages across the Omaha area

Summer fun: Museum exhibitions

Summer fun: Spectator sports and other marquee events

Summer fun: Food and drink

Summer fun: Drive-in theaters and outdoor movies

Summer fun: Galleries and special showings

PhotoFiles: Independence Day parades near Lincoln

Girl in patriotic top hat, 2014

Girl in patriotic top hat, 2014

Grace Preciado, 6, rides blinded by her festive top hat in the East Campus Community Organization holiday parade on Friday, July 4, 2014, near Idylwild Park.



5-year-old rides trike in parade, 2014

5-year-old rides trike in parade, 2014

Connor Hall, 5, rides with his balloons in the parade during the East Campus Community Organization holiday celebration on July 4, 2014, near Idylwild Park.



Mother and daughter at Waverlyfest, 2014

Mother and daughter at Waverlyfest, 2014

Natalie Lenz and her 2-year-old daughter, Chloe, watch the festivities on July 4, 2014, during the Waverlyfest parade.



Seward Grand Parade, 2019

Seward Grand Parade, 2019

Seward’s color guard marches during Seward’s grand parade celebrating the Fourth of July in 2019.



Pre-parade pose from 4-year-old, 2004

Pre-parade pose from 4-year-old, 2004

Whitney Jolliffe, 4, is all decked out before getting on her bike for a neighborhood Fourth of July parade in 2004.



Vehicle at Seward Grand Parade, 2019

Vehicle at Seward Grand Parade, 2019

A small vehicle navigates the route at Seward’s Grand Parade on July 4, 2019, celebrating the Fourth of July. 



Tractors at Seward parade, 2018

Tractors at Seward parade, 2018

Byron Luebbe drives one of a long line of tractors during Seward’s Fourth of July parade in 2018.



East Campus July 4th parade, 2017

East Campus July 4th parade, 2017

Harrison Jones (right) and his little brother, Hank Jones, drive a toy car during the East Campus parade in 2017.



Bike riders at 2013 parade

Bike riders at 2013 parade

Youngsters dressed in red, white and blue to celebrate the Fourth of July ride down the street during a parade near Idylwild Park on July 4, 2013.



Abraham Lincoln portrayal at July Fourth parade, 2013

Abraham Lincoln portrayal at July Fourth parade, 2013

Rachel Witkovski looks at her husband, Marc Witkovski, who is playing the part of Abraham Lincoln while celebrating Independence Day in 2013 near Idylwild Park.



Fourth of July Parade at Idylwild Park, 2013

Fourth of July Parade at Idylwild Park, 2013

Youngsters dress in red, white and blue to celebrate Independence Day fill the street near in a parade near Idylwild Park in 2013.



Horses at Seward Grand Parade, 2012

Horses at Seward Grand Parade, 2012

Members of the Seward County Sheriff’s Posse ride down the street past large John Deere tractors as they prepare for the Seward Grand Parade on  July 4, 2012.



Pair at Seward Grand Parade, 2012

Pair at Seward Grand Parade, 2012

Dustin Schlake (left) and Patrick Gilson get into the spirit at the Seward Grand Parade on July 4, 2012.



High Street Independence Day parade, 1986

High Street Independence Day parade, 1986

Russell Meyer, 6, and Amy Knight, 10, lead a High Street parade in Lincoln on July 4, 1986.



Doll and candy at Seward Grand Parade, 2012

Doll and candy at Seward Grand Parade, 2012

A baby doll is abandoned in favor of candy thrown by the Seward Grand Parade participants on July 4, 2012 in Seward.



Bike Riders at Indian Village parade, 2015

Bike Riders at Indian Village parade, 2015

Uncle Sam leads the parade through the Indian Village neighborhood during the annual Fourth of July Parade in 2015.



Getting wet at Waverlyfest parade, 2014

Getting wet at Waverlyfest parade, 2014

Seven-year-old Jace Kroger of Waverly gets a little more than candy as a fire truck hoses him and others down on July 4, 2014, during the Waverlyfest parade.



Girl in patriotic glasses, 2014

Girl in patriotic glasses, 2014

Decked-out in her stylish Stars and Stripes sunglasses, 7-year-old Kaylee Elliott watches as Motega Clancy of Lincoln catches candy from a Raymond Rural Fire District fire truck on July 4, 2014, during the Waverlyfest parade.



Girl and mother in parade, 2013

Girl and mother in parade, 2013

Gypsy Anton, 2, sits on her mother Jenny Anton’s lap while riding along in a parade to celebrate the 237th anniversary of Independence Day on July 4, 2013, near Idylwild Park.



Clown at 2003 parade in Ralston

Clown at 2003 parade in Ralston

Phill Harris walks the Ralston Independence Day parade in his clown costume on July 4, 2003.



Independence Day parade, 1995

Independence Day parade, 1995

Children attending a daycare in Lincoln get a jump on the Fourth of July with a parade in 1995.



Uncle Sam at Indian Village parade, 2015

Uncle Sam at Indian Village parade, 2015

David McCreary assumes his annual role as Uncle Sam, leading the Indian Village Fourth of July Parade with a pack of children on decorated bicycles on July 4, 2015.



Three-year-old at 2017 East Campus parade

Three-year-old at 2017 East Campus parade

Aliya Wieting, 3, rides in a decorated wagon during the East Campus July 4th Parade in 2017 at Idylwild Park.



1-year-old rides in East Campus parade, 2014

1-year-old rides in East Campus parade, 2014

Morgan Halsted, 1, rides in the East Campus Community Organization holiday parade on July 4, 2014, near Idylwild Park.



Captain America kid, East Campus July 4th Parade, 2017

Captain America kid, East Campus July 4th Parade, 2017

Silas Moore, age 4, dresses up as superhero Captain America for the East Campus Independence Day Parade on July 4, 2017, at Idylwild Park.



Waverly High School band members at parade, 2014

Waverly High School band members at parade, 2014

Waverly High School band members Maggie Geiler (from left), Skye Wellman, Hunter Buresh, Owen Martin and Josh Post play patriotic tunes as they sit on the end of a flatbed trailer July 4, 2014, during the Waverlyfest parade.



Grandparent, grandchildren ready for parade, 2001

Grandparent, grandchildren ready for parade, 2001

Eileen Lippold is ready for the annual Fourth of July parade in Waverly in 2001, with help from her grandchildren Kody Lundy, 11, holding Kole Fillmore, 2, in the driver’s seat, and (from left) Megan Lippold, 10; Korey Fillmore, 8; Taylor Lippold, 4; and Koby Fillmore, 2.



Colonial honor guard at Seward parade, 2017

Colonial honor guard at Seward parade, 2017

Dressed in Colonial era uniforms, this honor guard was one of the first groups to march in Seward’s Fourth of July parade in 2017.



We want candy, 2014

We want candy, 2014

Sisters Jaylee, 10, (center) and Ryane Cowen, 5, yell for candy during the grand parade at the 146th annual Seward Fourth of July celebration in 2014.



Kids on scooters at July 4 celebration, 2016

Kids on scooters at July 4 celebration, 2016

Ben Warner (left) and Hudson Wright, both 5, ride their decorated scooters in the parade during the July Fourth celebration in 2016, at Trendwood Park.



Girl at East Campus July Fourth parade, 2017

Girl at East Campus July Fourth parade, 2017

Morgan Halsted, 4, preparess to throw candy to the parade spectators during the East Campus July Fourth parade on July 4, 2017, at Idylwild Park.



7-year-old at East Campus parade, 2017

7-year-old at East Campus parade, 2017

Lucy Mayeux, 7, shows off her decorative eyelashes at the East Campus July Fourth parade at Idylwild Park in 2017.



Tricycle girl at 2013 Independence Day

Tricycle girl at 2013 Independence Day

Nadja Madden, 3, rides her tricycle on Apple Street during a celebration for the 237th anniversary of Independence Day in 2013, near Idylwild Park.



Bubbles and boy at Indian Village parade, 2015

Bubbles and boy at Indian Village parade, 2015

Jonah Rabe waves from a wagon that is outfitted with a bubble machine and pulled by his grandfather during the Indian Village Fourth of July Parade in 2015.



Operation Homecoming parade, 1991

Operation Homecoming parade, 1991

A 155mm self-propelled howitzer rumbles down O Street during the Operation Homecoming parade on July 4, 1991.



Parade watchers at Operation Homecoming, 1991

Parade watchers at Operation Homecoming, 1991

Harry and Ruth Robinson watch the Operation Homecoming parade on July 4, 1991.



Squirts on Fourth of July, 2000

Squirts on Fourth of July, 2000

Eight-year-olds Steven Perkins, Andrew Koranda and Jake Suhr relish their roles as crowd-coolers as they make their way along the parade route in Seward on July 4, 2000.



Cooling off during Friend parade, 2008

Cooling off during Friend parade, 2008

The Friend Fire Department cools off Jordyn Ratkovec (left), and brothers Colten and Skyler during the annual Fourth of July parade in Friend in 2008.



Waiting for candy in Seward, 2017

Waiting for candy in Seward, 2017

With plastics bags at the ready, a group of youngsters awaits candy treats as a group of tractors head westbound down Seward Street on July 4, 2017, during the annual Fourth of July parade.



Opinion: Summers residing off the land influenced management type of Inuk CEO Clint Davis

Clint Davis says, “The key to success for indigenous businesses begins with medium and large companies opening up their sourcing processes to support underrepresented businesses beyond their normal suppliers.”

Illustration by Chief Lady Bird

Clint Davis, Inuk from Labrador, is President and Chief Executive Officer of Nunasi Corp., an Inuit development company headquartered in Iqaluit. Mr. Davis holds a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Acadia University, a law degree from Dalhousie University, and a master’s degree in public administration from Harvard University, where he was a Canadian-American Fulbright Fellow. Prior to joining Nunasi, he was CEO of North35 Capital Partners, a corporate and capital advisory firm that worked with indigenous governments and business development firms to drive growth. Mr. Davis was also vice president of indigenous banking at Toronto-Dominion Bank. In 2016, Mr. Davis received the Indspire Award for Business and Commerce.

How has your upbringing influenced your perspective as a leader?

My mother was quite young when she had me, and that’s how my grandparents raised me. My grandfather was a hunter, fisherman, and trapper, and while he was in the country my grandmother raised nine children alone. As a child, my family went to our cabin on the Labrador coast every summer to fish and pick berries. It was and is a very remote area. There was no running water or electricity, just the forest and the river. The time we spent there was really about living on the land like in the past. These years in the country were very formative experiences for me.

The story continues under the advertisement

As I got older and worked mostly in urban areas, I felt especially blessed to have experienced this. Now I really cherish these memories and in spite of all the mosquitoes I base myself in these feelings of gratitude.

How has your Inuk identity influenced your career?

It has influenced and continues to influence my value system and how I make decisions, especially professional ones. If you look at my resume you can clearly see that I was down a certain path in the work I was involved in. This was not only because I found learning about indigenous law, politics, or economics intellectually stimulating, but also because the positions and organizations related to larger issues that were important to me.

The fact that my community was going through the land claim process sparked my interest in indigenous laws and guidelines. It was also the basis of my interest in broader issues that improve the socio-economic position of indigenous people through greater participation in the Canadian economy. Throughout my career I have always looked for opportunities to contribute because I have certain skills and thought that I could be of value in that regard. Being an Inuk is something I am very proud of and my identity has influenced me in so many important ways.

After working in both the public and private sectors, how do you think companies can learn from government?

I think government is very much about balance. When you work in the public service, you always weigh different interests, considerations in the allocation of your financial resources, and the complex consequences of the policies you follow. They get used to asking the question: How does this affect our citizens and improve society?

On the other hand, I believe that different industries and companies are gradually realizing that business is bigger than just maximizing shareholder wealth. I think that’s why ESG is growing in popularity [environmental, social, and governance] and socially responsible investing. I think the business is gradually realizing the need for balance and addressing issues and considerations that they have never had to deal with before. Some of these include indigenous rights, the environment, and equity, diversity and inclusion. Most of all, I think the government has a lot to teach in order to be a better corporate citizen.

The story continues under the advertisement

Can you briefly describe today’s “indigenous economy”?

The two main drivers of the indigenous economy are indigenous entrepreneurs with over 30,000 across the country, as well as jointly owned companies or development companies. While there is great diversity in their approaches, structures, and strategies, there are also some important things that they have in common. This generally includes a foundation of indigenous values, respect for the land, a long-term business vision, and a value for culture. Based on research by the Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business, every entrepreneur places great value on recruiting, training, and developing indigenous peoples, although indigenous-owned businesses are small to medium-sized.

What are three keys to successfully supporting indigenous businesses and business owners?

The key to success for indigenous companies begins with medium and large companies opening up their sourcing processes to support underrepresented companies beyond their normal suppliers. By setting hard goals for these companies, a new market and customer base is created for indigenous companies. Additionally, the amount of money the Canadian government spends each year pales in comparison to the amount of money it could spend on indigenous businesses compared to what they could actually do. They recently made a public commitment to 5 percent of their procurement spending on indigenous businesses. Once that happens, it will have a profound impact on the indigenous economy.

I think some of the other keys to the support and success of indigenous businesses, especially in the communities, are the need for basic infrastructure. While this certainly affects things like buildings and roads, it extends further these days as well. When everything is online, it is very difficult to run a business when you live in a community where you have limited connectivity.

After all, not only do we need debt, we also need more organizations to inject equity into indigenous businesses. For example, I think organizations like the National Aboriginal Capital Corporations Association or Raven Capital Partners are vital in providing the necessary capital for startups through co-investment and financial innovation opportunities.

The story continues under the advertisement

What advice do you have for Indigenous youth reading the column?

Dream big, concentrate on your education and stay close to your identity and be proud of it. My wife and I keep telling our three children this. I believe this will help indigenous youth have a positive impact on their communities, their nations and the world at large.

Read more from our series of indigenous business leaders:

For Mi’kmaw educator Marie Battiste, inner growth is essential to being a leader

“Our survival depends entirely on living in nature, not on it,” says the indigenous rights attorney

The story continues under the advertisement

For Senator Murray Sinclair, leadership is defined by humility

Trust is the foundation of leadership, says Membertou First Nation Chief Terry Paul

We need to make economic reconciliation a priority, says Tabatha Bull, CEO of the Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business

For Tracy Bear, leadership begins with accountability, service, and connection with the land

For APTN managing director Monika Ille, leadership means honoring the history of her nation

Pause, Think, Listen: National Bank Financial’s Sean St. John on Using Indigenous Leadership Approaches

The story continues under the advertisement

About the series

Canada has a long history of dispossession, oppression and discrimination against indigenous peoples. However, the future is full of hope. The indigenous population is the fastest growing population in Canada. His youth catalyzes coast-to-coast change. Indigenous knowledge and teachings guide innovative approaches to environmental protection and holistic wellbeing worldwide. Indigenous scientists are leading the way in exciting new research in science, business and beyond. There is no better or more urgent time to understand and celebrate the importance of indigenous insights, culture and perspectives.

Optimism is rare in the media. And reporting on indigenous peoples often fails to capture their brilliance, diversity and strength. In this weekly series of interviews, we will involve Indigenous leaders in thoughtful conversations and share their stories, strategies, challenges and successes.

Karl Moore is a professor in the Desautels Faculty of Management at McGill University in Montreal. He is also an Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford University. He hosted a long-running video series for The Globe and Mail interviewing business leaders and business professors from the world’s best universities. His column Rethinking Leadership was published at Forbes.com Since 2011, he has built a worldwide reputation for research and writing on leadership, interviewing more than 1,000 executives, including CEOs, prime ministers and generals.

Wáhiakatste Diome-Deer is doing her Masters in Educational Leadership at McGill. She holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Psychology and Brain Science from Dartmouth College, New Hampshire, and a degree from Harvard University, Massachusetts. She is an education, leadership, and indigenization consultant for organizations and schools, and previously held positions at the Kahnawake Education Center, the Quebec Native Women Association, and the Canadian Executive Service Organization. Ms. Diome-Deer is a traditional Kanien’kehá: ka woman from the Kahnawà: ke community.

Your time is precious. Have the Top Business Headlines newsletter conveniently delivered to your inbox in the morning or evening. Register today.