College students Give Duncanville Excessive College Soccer Crew A ‘D’ville-Fashion’ Ship Off – CBS Dallas / Fort Price

DUNCANVILLE, Texas (CBSDFW.COM) – The winter break has officially started, but before the students left Duncanville High School today, they lined the halls to give the soccer team a “D’ville-esque” dismissal for the UIL 6A State Championship.

DHS students say goodbye to their soccer team before the national championship on Saturday. (Photo credit: Duncanville High School)

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This afternoon, the football team marched through the school halls behind cheerleaders, the drill team and the band’s drumline before heading out onto the field for the final practice session before the big game.

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For the third time in four years, the DHS soccer team is returning to the UIL 6A State Championship game with the aim of bringing home the state’s top title.

Kick-off is Saturday, December 18th at 3:00 p.m. at AT&T Stadium in Arlington. The Panthers will face North Shore High School in a rematch after meeting them in the 2018 and 2019 Championship Games.

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KU college students discover fashion inspiration in popular culture | Arts & Tradition

Streaming services like Netflix and Hulu have enabled television and movie characters – new and old – to revive clothing styles and influence fashion trends.

Katie Dixon, senior business analytics and accounting major, said that movies and television have a huge impact on fashion trends.

“I remember when ‘Euphoria’ came out and everyone wanted to experiment with makeup,” said Dixon. “Or when I was in middle school, Pretty Little Liars was the greatest show and everyone wanted to dress like these girls.”

Middle school trends that Dixon is referring to include skinny jeans with wedges and large accessories.

However, some students feel that social media has a greater impact on influencing trends than television.

Lulu Stones, a senior strategic communications major of Raleigh, North Carolina, said that fashion on television had taken a back seat to influence trends. With social media platforms such as Youtube, Instagram and TikTok, Stones felt personally inspired by the apps.

“I think the more people stream, the less relevant fashion is on TV compared to what can be seen on social media and what influencers do on Instagram, Pinterest, [and] TikTok, ”said Stones. “During the quarantine, I was definitely heavily influenced by TikTok style trends.”

The trends she is referring to are oversized button-ups, sweater vests, and skater skirts, Stones said.

While she doesn’t believe that television has the greatest influence on current styles, Stones recognizes that television has some influence on trends. Shows like “Outer Banks” and the HBO Max reboot of “Gossip Girl” have sparked an influx of new trends, Stones said.

“The release of the new ‘Gossip Girl’ was in vogue around the same time [Tik]Tok exploded with preppy street styles like oversized button-ups, sweater vests and skater skirts, ”said Stones.

Although various media outlets have taken over the fashion influences, iconic characters and their style choices continue to dominate the clothes people buy, like that a report from Lyst. Shows like “Emily in Paris” and “Normal People” have been featured as the top two fashion influences on the silver screen of 2020.

Films like “The Devil Wears Prada” changed Dixon’s view of the fashion industry.

“I was in my uncomfortable teenage years where I still didn’t know how to dress or what to and shouldn’t wear,” said Dixon. “I remember sitting in the living room with my mom and watching this movie and how much I was involved with Anne Hathaway’s character. At that time I didn’t care how I look and just put on clean clothes. “

It was the iconic Meryl Streep monologue that shamed Hathaway’s sky blue sweater, which emphasized the importance of fashion to Dixon and showed her how powerful the fashion industry can be.

“Describes that clothes are not ‘just stuff’, that they are jobs and millions of dollars that go into just one color, that the fashion industry is not just about clothes, but the meaning behind it and the work [that] was only used to make a piece, ”said Dixon.

Dixon said she has begun relativizing her own style choices and discovering a new appreciation for what the industry has to offer.

As for Stones, she believes relatable movie and television characters can influence personal style.

“At some point, when you get into the character, you get to know the celebrity in their real life and look up to them and know that if they can play great roles in movies and TV, they can have a cool or interesting real life, and you pay attention to details, ”said Stones. “That’s what stays in your mind, and that’s what you look for, after all [in] yourself.”

Although her style has changed, Stones feels that her personal style has taken on fewer rules as she is more exposed to trends from the media.

“My view of fashion was less about sticking to a certain style and just letting me buy things that catch my eye or things that I like, whether it’s preppy, boho, chic, [or] sporty, ”said Stones.

Similarly, Dixon said her fashion developed beyond the characters she used to idolize in television and film.

“It’s funny looking back at the movies I’ve watched religiously and trying to imagine how I’m wearing this stuff now,” said Dixon. “I think at that time it was a lot easier to reflect on what the TV shows and movies attract their characters. Now I think the industry has changed so much that there are so many different trends to follow.”

Regardless, Dixon believes the impact that characters and on-screen shows have had on the fashion industry is undeniable.

“If you are to be successful in the industry, you have to keep up with what affects everyone most,” said Dixon. “Sometimes it can be a trend that lasts for a week while others can last for months.”

DePaul college students brace the chilly in model

For some of us there is no need to take the time to choose an outfit. Of course we have to get dressed every day, but it is seldom more strenuous than pouring a glass of water. On the other hand, some people live from the feeling of choosing the perfect outfit for the day.

It can be difficult to focus on anything other than coursework during graduation week, but that hasn’t stopped DePaul students from dressing sharply this winter season.

“I have no idea how some people manage to look fashionable in general during exams or just in class,” said Alli Hacker, a member of the DePaul Fashion Society. “And I don’t mean that in a judgmental tone – kudos to her. I wish I could be her! “

“When I put an outfit together, I feel like I’m doing something for myself,” says Callie Beier, a community psych student at DePaul. “In a way, it’s self-care. I can think about myself for 5 or 10 minutes and how I want to present myself to the world on this day. “

While there can be endless stress during these times, distracting attention from the finals and spending just a few minutes on an outfit can make a meaningful difference in how a person feels throughout the day.

“I think fashion is a distraction – in a good way,” said Hannah Lau, president of the DePaul Fashion Society. “Even if you fail this test, you still look cute.”

Fashion isn’t just about what other people think of someone’s outfit – it’s a way for students to feel more confident. DePaul students do not put their outfits together for others, but for themselves.

“It’s just fun to feel together,” said Lau. “I don’t really think about how people will perceive me, but it gives me confidence to know that I am ready for the day.”

Not only does fashion help students feel more organized and ready for the day, it is also a powerful outlet for individuality and ingenuity.

“It’s amazing to be creative when you’re so busy with responsibilities and commitments,” said Hacker.

“Fashion is an extension of someone’s creativity,” said Lau. “Whether someone is interested in comfort and a thirst for adventure, or rather cheeky and colorful, you can tell how they define themselves in these areas of fashion.”

As winter approaches, students switch from fall fashion – switching from light jackets to heavier, warmer coats. In keeping with this seasonal shift, the DePaul students rock the latest fashion trends and give the outfits unique twists.

“I think we’ll see typical winter layerings, but with turtlenecks and leather [or] Suede button vests, ”Hacker said.

In colder weather, finding ways to look fashionable while staying warm at the same time can be a chore. Fortunately, layering is an essential and longstanding winter fashion trend.

“My favorite part of winter fashion is combining layers and layers,” said Lau. “It’s about how you stay warm and feel good, even when it’s cool.”

A handful of trends follow in winter, including knitted sweaters, funky fur coats and all kinds of boots.

“Some of the main trends I’ve seen are higher knee boots, geometric patterns, ski pants, leather, and even color contrasts,” Lau said.

“My favorite trends are chunky boots and [the color] brown, ”said Beier. “I think people sometimes think brown is boring, but you can find really elegant pieces and pair them with something bold and chunky for a sophisticated yet fun look.”

Although neutral colors like brown are a staple in winter, some DePaul students are swapping out cooler tones for lighter ones this season.

Even certain colors find their way into the trends, DePaul students swap out neutral colors and find lighter colors to express themselves with.

“I’m so fed up with neutrals in winter,” said Hacker. “I love to see powder blue, forest green and all shades of red for Christmas, gemstones for New Year’s Eve and pink, purple, red and even buttercup yellow.”

As the finals come and go, the weather in Chicago is slowly but surely getting colder and colder, which means we’re about to see a lot more of these exciting winter fashion trends.

Shark Tank-style innovation problem pushes college students to search out options to each day issues

Ailani Barr, a freshman at Armstrong Junior High, wants to find a way to relieve her grandmother’s liver problems.

As part of a new project-based science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) learning program, FlexFactor, Barr learned the importance of flexible hybrid electronics and how it can be used to solve real-world problems.

In order to detect gastrointestinal diseases and other problems that can result from the liver, she, along with a few other students, came up with the idea of ​​a camera contained in a pill that goes through the digestive system and is attached to the liver to find possible gastric complications.

“We thought about it because my grandma has liver problems and she’s older, so she doesn’t believe in a lot of medical technology. This could give her a way to tell if she has liver problems,” Barr said.

Students across the Golden Triangle are learning about the importance of manufacturing and hybrid electronics.

FlexFactor is locally managed by East Mississippi Community College and owned by the NextFlex research institute. The students identify a problem they want to fix, research a way to solve it and show their project idea to a panel in a “Shark Tank” -style presentation. Camille Cooper, coordinator of the EMCC FlexFactor Outreach, said this program not only teaches students to think critically, but also introduces them to careers that they may not necessarily be familiar with.

Camille Cooper

“We want students to see themselves as something after high school,” said Cooper. “We’re not necessarily trying to push them to EMCC or an advanced manufacturing career. … This program just gives you a lot of different opportunities and teaches you real life. “

Together with Armstrong Junior High, EMCC has partnered with Columbus High School and Golden Triangle Early College High School to produce FlexFactor – with 278 students in those three schools learning skills such as problem identification, research methodology, and slide presentation programs.

The program began in mid-October and ends on November 17, when students present their graduation projects to panels composed of school board members, community partners, and representatives from the Golden Triangle Development Link. Cooper said FlexFactor is bringing K-12 education, college, and the professional industries together to help future generations.

“It’s really rewarding to see how far these students have come in six weeks,” said Cooper. “This program lets you think outside the box. There are already solutions for many things, but that makes them a little more difficult and gives them the opportunity to develop their own solution. “

Katie Young, the AJH freshman faculty sponsor, said the students for this program were selected by those who were in manufacturing and technology for the You Science test, an aptitude test that not only had career interests but also Abilities measures have been accelerated. Young said she loved watching her students excel on this program because it allows them to learn about careers in manufacturing.

“It was great to see our kids doing something outside of their normal routine,” said Young. “It’s a way to apply the skills you’ve learned in the classroom and solve real-world problems. That really gives teenagers strength. “

Barr said FlexFactor inspired her to potentially pursue a career in manufacturing in the future, as she now knows the process of making technological products.

“It was a good experience because I saw how things are done,” said Barr. “… I could imagine doing such a job.”

Faculty district receives grant cash to help college students’ psychological well being

The Nevada Department of Education (NDE) has awarded the Washoe County School District (WCSD) a five-year grant to plan and implement mental health awareness strategies and connectivity support at seven schools in the district.

The scholarship is approximately $ 500,000 per year for five years, and WCSD will work with neighboring school districts and multiple agencies to provide services to students.

The schools whose students receive the grant-funded services are Damonte Ranch High School, Traner and Vaughn Middle Schools, and Smithridge, Stead, Duncan, and Lemmon Valley Elementary Schools.

“We are grateful for this scholarship, which offers tremendous support to students in greatest need of mental health resources,” said Paul LaMarca, chief strategy officer at WCSD. “The COVID pandemic and its associated personal, emotional and economic impact have adversely affected our students and families.

Source: WCSD

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College students showcase their private type via trend

University of Miami students express themselves creatively, especially with their clothes. They show their uniqueness through their own everyday fashion sense.

Everyday street fashion may not be shown on the catwalk like last week at New York Fashion Week, or with extravagant ball gowns like the Met Gala. But everyday clothing develops a life of its own as a unique opportunity for expression and creativity. Through their clothes, shoes, accessories and hairstyles, the University of Miami students show their creativity and uniqueness by showing their own fashion sense on campus.

Grace Altidor, a junior from Cape Coral, Florida, is studying health sciences

“Today my outfit is just a white U-Polo that I actually saved from UThrift! My goal is usually to look cute. Unless it’s for my 8 o’clock class. Then it’s never cute. I think my fashion is usually a mix of streetwear and a bit of preppy. In the Miami area it’s usually dresses or shorts. “

Cassadee Wellings, a sophomore media management student from Key West, Florida

“For school, I’ll probably try to dress it up with a fun shirt and color. I have shoes of every single color; So I match the shirt and shoes with them and wear them with jeans. I would say my style is modern-urban. And when it comes to jewelry, I always have to wear something gold. “

Cassadee Wellings

Jack Newman, a junior from Bradenton, Florida, is studying ecosystem science and policy

“I’m inspired by myself and everything I think looks cool. My hair has been green for about a month now and before that it was blonde. I love my mullet. Not many people rock you these days. All I have is frugal. My pants, my bag, everything is goodwill. “

Jack Newman

Nonii Randall, a junior from Harlem, New York, with a dual degree in finance and law

“These little denim shorts are from American Apparel and I bought them at a thrift store for about $ 10. This shirt was my mom’s, and I’m just wearing some old, old trainers. And this bucket hat is my uncle’s bucket hat. “

Randall added an oversized bag to her sporty outfit – but not just any bag. She managed to get hold of one of the most popular fashion pieces of the year – a large cream Telfar tote bag. After being worn by Beyoncé, the bag sells out in minutes.

“This is my second. I was on the website 10 minutes before dropping off and had to pre-fill all of my personal and card details so I only needed my fingerprint to secure the purchase. Fortunately, I live right next to the distribution center in New York, so it came the next day. “

Nonii Randall

Allison Guaty, a third year law student from Miami, Florida

“I like to look more professional, but I also wear casual and comfortable outfits. I want to look organized for my class, but I don’t want to wear anything that I don’t enjoy studying in for hours. “

Allison Guaty

Laura Benoit, a sophomore studying creative advertising from New Jersey

“I really like the combination of urban chic. I love to equip with rings. I always wear earrings and necklaces. I like to combine casual clothing with accents from dressed-up styles to make myself look a bit more formal, but still relaxed. I also like to make a big statement on my hair. And I think patterns or bright colors feel like my style. “

Laura Benoit

College students to obtain each day $50 Meal Cash credit score from Aug. 24 to 29 following eating service shortages – The Vanderbilt Hustler

The $ 50 Summer / Vacation Plan credit will expire at the end of each day. Students also receive a one-time credit of $ 15 in their meal money fund that does not expire.

During lunch at the E. Bronson Ingram Dining Hall, the students stood in a row toward Kirkland Hall. Image taken on Aug. 21, 2020. (Courtesy photo by Jason Hwong).

To compensate for the dinner shortage, Campus Dining announced on August 23 that students would receive a $ 50 daily credit from August 24-29, which expires at the end of each day. In addition, they will receive a one-time rollover credit for meal money of $ 15. Dining room dispensers will continue to be available and meal credit can be redeemed at any Taste of Nashville partner restaurant or Grubhub location.

“We’ve heard your feedback and are aware of the unacceptably long lines and product shortages,” said Campus Dining opinion read. “We assume that these expanded options will reduce the workload for both the cafeteria staff and the students, and will enable our operations to build up stocks again for next week.”

Second year Anjali Raman, who tried to use the $ 50 balance today, has been charged through her Meal Money fund, which currently only has the $ 15 balance available, rather than the summer / vacation plan which is currently not visible in the GET app. Campus Dining did not immediately respond to The Hustler’s request for comment on the matter.

Regarding future improvements, Campus Dining said in its statement that it is working to fix supply chain disruptions such as late or incomplete deliveries and other backup issues. In addition, a “Commissary Kitchen” has been built on campus to reduce waiting times for Rand Grab & Go Market orders. Dining rooms will also offer additional food lines to increase service efficiency. Campus Dining did not immediately respond to The Hustler’s request to comment on these changes.

On August 23, E. Bronson Ingram’s (EBI) dining room and Kissam kitchen experienced a food shortage during dinner. Second year Jason Hwong said EBI ended dinner service around 7:00 p.m. CDT, 30 minutes before regular closing. Kissam closed at approximately 7:20 p.m. CDT, 1 hour and 10 minutes before regular closure.

On August 21, Campus Dining closed all dining rooms for dinner service, so students had to purchase dinner off campus with either meal money or personal funds. According to Campus Dining’s website, the student meal plans were activated that day.

Hwong expressed frustration with the decision, citing that early moving students – including RAs, VUceptors, orientation leaders, and new international and transfer students – have relied on dining room access since arriving on campus.

In an email to Campus Dining, Vice Chancellor David ter Kuile and Vice Chancellor of Administration Eric Kopstain, Hwong outlined his concerns about the restaurant operations and copied ten students who were also unable to eat with food punches that evening, and asked to be included in the recording The conversation.

“Those who from the [Aug. 21], regardless of when they moved in, should not be forced to spend meal money or out-of-pocket meals that should be provided by the school, “Hwong said in the email. “We are paying to be able to use these food expenditures, and it is totally unacceptable that no dining rooms are open at a time when the meal plan is in effect.”

In the future, Hwong emphasized the need for a “productive” dialog between students and campus dining.

“I would also like to make it clear that while monetary compensation is an important and necessary step to remedy the previous deficits of Campus Dining, it is more important to implement meaningful changes in the gastronomic offerings that address the problems we have experienced, actually fix it. ”“ Hwong said.

This article will be updated with responses from Campus Dining.

How faculty closures have an effect on taxpayers and college students: ‘You stole my cash and I’m $188,000 in debt and for what?’

Hello and welcome back to MarketWatch’s Additional credit Column, a weekly look at the news through the lens of debt.

I have this week written about the collapse of some well-known college chains, the dissolution of their parent organization Dream Center Educational Holdings, and pressure from advocates and students to hold school executives accountable for their collapse.

For this week’s extra credit, I figured I’d stick with the topic and talk a bit about the impact of school closings on students and taxpayers.

When college chains like the Dream Center – including the Art Institutes and Argosy University – collapse, students are left with few good options. You can try to transfer your credits to another school. Or they can have their federal student loans canceled, putting taxpayers at risk for any canceled debt. But the people who ran the schools often escape responsibility.

Proponents urge the Biden government to hold executives personally accountable for their role in the demise of these schools, a move they believe could protect students and taxpayers in the future. When schools collapse, the Department of Education, which is usually one of many creditors, doesn’t have much money left to claim and use to mitigate losses.

In the case of the Dream Center, the Department of Education has already canceled more than $ 100 million in loans to borrowers who attended schools when they closed.

“Pursuing personal liability is the only way to prevent hasty closings and reimburse taxpayers for the costs associated with fraud and closings that are most harmful to students,” said Yan Cao, senior fellow of the Century Foundation.

Still, some are skeptical of the idea of ​​holding school principals personally accountable. While executives who break the law and are knowingly involved in misconduct should not be immune from legal scrutiny, “the proposal goes way beyond that,” said Jason Altmire, president of Career Education Colleges and Universities, a trade group that promotes for-profit corporations represents universities.

“This is a bit of a departure from the traditional rules of personal responsibility in American corporate law,” he said.

Further than the Ministry of Education has ever gone

Holding executives accountable would be further than the Department of Education has ever gone in overseeing for-profit colleges. Still, the agency has had powers to do so since the 1990s, the National Student Legal Defense Network, which represents student loan borrowers in litigation, including former students of the arts institutes, argued in a memo last year.

Senator Elizabeth Warren, a Massachusetts Democrat and former long-time university professor, confirmed that conclusion in a press Publication for the report. She urged the department “to use every available tool to hold executives and university owners personally accountable who defraud students”.

This week, Rep. Bobby Scott, a Virginia Democrat and chairman of the House Education and Labor Committee, said: wrote to The Ministry of Education is calling on the agency to use its powers to hold executives personally responsible for the liabilities of their collapsed schools to the federal government.

“We want them to use whatever leverage they have to achieve progressive profits, and that includes curbing abuse of for-profit colleges,” said Jeff Hauser, executive director of The Revolving Door Project at the Center for Economic and Policy Research Bidener administration. “In general, dishonesty and consumer fraud must be taken very seriously by the executive branch.”

One way to do this would be to take a closer look at the agreements colleges are making with the Department of Education to receive federal grants, said Beth Stein, senior advisor at the Institute for College Access and Success. “We have to think a little more proactively about what the terms of the contract look like,” said Stein. The contracts could, for example, include personal liability on the part of managers in the event of a college failure.

“This is something the new boss of [the Office of Federal Student Aid]”And his team” could contribute to how they might approach these things in the future, “she said.

“The people who are held accountable will not be held accountable”

Meanwhile, students like Cherisse Hunter-Southern struggled with the aftermath of the turmoil for the school chains for years before they became part of the Dream Center portfolio and eventually collapsed.

Hunter-Southern, 40, is about the age she would like to consider buying a home, but the damage to her creditworthiness from the $ 188,000 student loan she is struggling to repay has made it difficult.

Hunter-Southern, who sued Argosy University shortly after it was sold to Dream Center by Education Management Corporation, chose the school’s campus in Ontario, California to get her PhD in psychology because they are attending college wanted to be close to her home, which was flexible enough to accommodate work, school and her duties as parents.

But the education was below average, she said even before the school closed.

The schools owned by the Dream Center collapsed in 2019 when it was alleged that college executives knew of accreditation problems at some of the art institutes’ campuses and failed to inform the students. and that students at many colleges in the Dream Center chains did not receive scholarships – the financial resources that students received in addition to tuition for living expenses – and more.

Earlier this year, Hunter-Southern wrote to the judge overseeing the bankruptcy administration, asking him to block a proposal by court-appointed bankruptcy administrator Mark Dottore that would rule out litigation against the executives for their behavior in relation to the schools.

Dottore, through his attorneys, urged the judge to overturn their objection, saying that “the overwhelming majority” of Hunter-Southern’s training took place while the school was owned by EDMC and the bar association’s order would not prevent them from filing claims filing against them of the entities that preceded the bankruptcy administration, including EDMC, or the bankruptcy administration. Dottore wrote through his attorneys that he may decline their request in the future.

Following a Zoom hearing earlier this week in which the judge announced he would approve the bar association’s order, Hunter-Southern said she was “confused” by the situation.

“The people who need to be held accountable will not be held accountable,” she said, adding that if the leaders “want to work elsewhere, they have the opportunity and potential to do the same, not just for me . but for other students. ”

Hunter-Southern found that consumers have the opportunity to get their money back with much smaller purchases than with higher education.

“If you go to the store and get broken sunglasses, you should be able to return the sunglasses and get the one you want,” she said.

“You stole my money and I owe $ 188,000 in debt and what for? The worst education ever. “

Much less college students means empty dorms, much less cash at Pennsylvania’s public universities – WPXI

PITTSBURGH – University officials at eight of the state’s 14 public universities are trying to find a way to deal with falling enrollments, less money, and whole wings and floors of dorm buildings.

The Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education continues to finalize the details of the merger between a number of the state’s universities as the fall semester rapidly approaches. According to our partners at TribLive.com, the system’s Chancellor Dan Greenstein proposed that $ 12.5 million be allocated this year to pay off dorm building debt. A review of state records found that more than $ 1 billion in dormitory debt remained in 13 out of 14 public universities.

Some schools have done better than others since the turn of the millennium. At Indiana University Pennsylvania officials began a massive dormitory construction and overhaul project from 2006 to 2010, priced at $ 250 million. By 2019, the occupancy rate in IUP’s dormitories had dropped to 68%.

Edinboro University officials embarked on a $ 115 million project to build dormitories and restaurants shortly after the IUD. The occupancy rate fell to 42% by 2019.

In the entire university system, roughly one in five beds was empty.

It is a problem that PSSHE is working to combat, as it is slated to create two new massive institutions by autumn 2022. There are 11 aging buildings slated to be demolished across multiple campuses in the system.

Uni withdraws scholar’s supply over racist abuse of England trio

England striker Jadon Sancho (C) is comforted by his teammates after missing a penalty in the UEFA EURO 2020 final between Italy and England at Wembley Stadium in London on July 11, 2021.

Laurence Griffiths | AFP | Getty Images

A university withdrew an offer from a student after racist abuse against English players after the EURO 2020 final.

Video footage from a Snapchat group chat was circulating on Instagram in which a person was heard using racist language to Marcus Rashford, Jadon Sancho and Bukayo Saka, who each missed penalties in the shooting at Wembley Stadium.

A spokesman for Nottingham Trent University said: “This allegation does not apply to an NTU student. We do not tolerate any form of discrimination, including racism.

“We dealt with this matter immediately and withdrew an offer from an applicant.”

Read more stories from Sky Sports

Police have arrested five people for racially abusing English players online since the defeat by Italy on Sunday.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced on Wednesday that the government plans to extend football bans over online racism, while social media companies face heavy fines if they fail to remove the abuse from their platforms.