State company provides tricks to save time, cash, stress throughout wildfire evacuations

Fire alarm

SALEM, Ore. (KTVZ) – The Bootleg, Jack and Grandview forest fires triggered several evacuation orders. The Oregon Division of Financial Regulation has Forest Fire Insurance Resources available to help people on every level of evacuation.

By doing these chores, you and your family can save time, money, and stress before, during, and after wildfire.

Evacuation level 3: When you receive the level 3 order, please leave your home ASAP.

  • If it is safe, tell your insurance company that you have been asked to evacuate. Confirm your insurance coverage, your deductible and your specific coverage limits.
  • Save all receipts. Many insurance companies help cover expenses such as room and board and animal boarding.
  • Work on a home inventory list.
    • Review photos and videos to remember personal belongings. Pay close attention to the background and look for smaller items like jewelry.
    • To the best of your knowledge, write down the age, original cost, and replacement cost of each item.

Evacuation level 1 and 2:

  • Contact your insurance company to review your policy.
    • Ask about deductibles and specific coverage limits
    • Ask about the automatic coverage. You need comprehensive insurance for your vehicle to cover damage caused by a forest fire.
  • Do a quick home inventory.
    • Take photos of every room in your home. Don’t forget storage spaces like the attic, shed, and garage.
    • Check your insurance company’s website for an app or checklist that will help.
  • Build a financial backpack.
    • Gather important financial documents such as passports, social security cards, insurance policies, titles, deeds, and financial accounts.
    • Make copies or scan them to your phone or computer.
  • Put all information with your emergency supplies so that you have this information at hand during the evacuation.

Outside the evacuation zone: The time to prepare is now.
Follow the department’s disaster preparedness tips at disaster dfr.oregon.gov/preparenow.

Additional resources are available on the department’s website Forest Fire Insurance Resources Page.

If you have any questions about insurance coverage, contact your insurance company or broker. If you still have any questions or concerns, the Consumer Advisory Team at the Financial Regulation Department can help.
• Call 888-877-4894 (toll free)
• Email dfr.insurancehelp@oregon.gov
• Visit dfr.oregon.gov
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About DCBS: The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon’s largest regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, visit dcbs.oregon.gov.

About Oregon DFR: The Financial Regulation Department is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon’s largest regulatory and consumer protection agency in Oregon. visit dcbs.oregon.gov and dfr.oregon.gov.

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International watchdogs float cures to treatment cash market fund stress

LONDON (Reuters) – Global financial regulators suggested options ranging from capital buffers to fees to avoid central banks having to bail out the $ 8.8 trillion money market fund (MMF) sector again, as they did last year have done in a “jump on cash”.

The Financial Stability Board (FSB), which coordinates the financial rules for the G20 economies, on Wednesday put forward a selection of measures for regulators to make MMFs more resilient and reduce the temptation of investors to flee into the exits.

During the extreme market turmoil in March 2020, the Federal Reserve and other central banks had to inject liquidity into the financial system for the second time in 12 years to keep money market funds from buckling under the strong demand for redemptions.

The industry has argued that all parts of the financial system were hit hard last year at the height of the COVID-19 crisis when economies were locked into a pandemic.

The MMF sector, with more than half in the United States, is vital to the short-term funding of the economy and businesses as it invests in government bonds and short-term papers that allow investors to redeem their stocks on a daily basis.

“MMFs are prone to sudden and disruptive repayments and can face challenges in selling assets, especially under stressful conditions,” the FSB said in a report.

One option is “swing pricing,” or the ability to allow fund managers to impose transaction costs on those who redeem shares in order to reduce the impact on investors who remain in the fund, the FSB said.

Another possibility is that a small portion of each investor’s shares will not be redeemed immediately and the implementation of “gates” or temporary bans on investor exits will be changed, he added.

A sufficient capital buffer would also ease the pressure from high redemptions, although that would add to the industry’s costs, the watchdog said, adding that stress testing for individual MMFs and for the sector as a whole could work as well.

Eric Pan, CEO of the global fund industry association ICI, said it was encouraging that the FSB was also recognizing the need to improve the way the broader short-term markets, including commercial paper and certificates of deposit, work better.

“What is important is that the FSB recognizes that certain reforms such as capital buffers and swing pricing could ultimately eliminate certain money market funds from the market,” said Pan.

The FSB has carried out a public consultation on the policy options and will publish a final report in October.

It would be up to the regulators in each member country to decide on the combination of measures so that they could bypass steps such as capital requirements that have divided regulators in the past as well as the industry.

The FSB will follow up on the implementation reviews.

Reporting by Huw Jones; Editing by Alexander Smith, Kirsten Donovan

International watchdogs float treatments to remedy cash market fund stress

By Huw Jones

LONDON, June 30 (Reuters) – Global financial regulators suggested options ranging from capital buffers to fees to avoid central banks having to bail out the $ 8.8 trillion money market fund (MMF) sector again as they did last have done in a “bump on cash” year.

The Financial Stability Board (FSB), which coordinates the financial rules for the G20 economies, on Wednesday put forward a selection of measures for regulators to make MMFs more resilient and reduce the temptation of investors to flee into the exits.

During the extreme market turmoil in March 2020, the Federal Reserve and other central banks had to inject liquidity into the financial system for the second time in 12 years to keep money market funds from buckling under the strong demand for redemptions.

The industry has argued that all parts of the financial system were hit hard last year at the height of the COVID-19 crisis when economies were locked into a pandemic.

The MMF sector, with more than half in the United States, is vital to the short-term funding of the economy and businesses as it invests in government bonds and short-term papers that allow investors to redeem their stocks on a daily basis.

“MMFs are prone to sudden and disruptive repayments and can face challenges in selling assets, especially under stressful conditions,” the FSB said in a report.

One option is “swing pricing” or the ability to allow fund managers to impose transaction costs on those who return shares in order to reduce the impact on investors who remain in the fund, the FSB said.

Another possibility is that a small fraction of each investor’s shares will not be redeemed immediately and the implementation of “gates” or temporary bans on investor exits will be changed, he added.

A sufficient capital buffer would also ease the pressure from high redemptions, although that would add to the industry’s costs, the watchdog said, adding that stress testing for individual MMFs and for the sector as a whole could work as well.

The story goes on

The FSB has carried out a public consultation on the policy options and will publish a final report in October.

It would be up to the regulators in each member country to decide on the combination of measures so that they could bypass steps such as capital requirements that have divided regulators in the past as well as the industry.

The FSB will follow up on the implementation reviews.

(Reporting by Huw Jones; Editing by Alexander Smith)

Travis Lemon: The brand new stress of regular | Options/Leisure

Normal? After over a year of being hypervigilant during a pandemic, I’m no longer sure I remember how normal it works. Do you?

Now that the CDC says that fully vaccinated people can begin most of the activities we did before the pandemic, there is an unusual level of stress that many of us are experiencing. The stress of the normal. Let’s look at a few things about this stress and see what we can do to feel a little better about ourselves.

Life without masks makes many people uncomfortable. When we are fully vaccinated, the mask is no longer as necessary in most situations as it was before, but if it makes you feel more comfortable then keep it on. Even if you are fully vaccinated, it is perfectly fine to keep wearing your mask if it makes you feel less stressed out. Of course, certain companies and workplaces may still require masks, so it’s best to have one with you anyway.

Accept that you are stressed out. Don’t try to deny that you are feeling stressed. Any change, good or bad, can come with stress. As much as we try to avoid it, life can just be stressful at times and it is best to acknowledge it and talk about it. Talk to your doctor and also consider starting a meditation practice. Many doctors and therapists will suggest incorporating mindfulness exercises into your daily life. I suggest keeping a daily gratitude journal listing the things you are grateful for each day. I also find that practicing loving kindness is a great way to balance a stressful time. If you’d like to give this practice a try, I’ve recorded some guided meditations on the Insight Timer app that you can try for free.

Support your adrenal glands. When we are under stress, our adrenal glands can suffer. These important glands are involved in our stress response, energy and focus. I recommend supplementing with a blend of adaptogenic herbs like holy basil, ashwagandha, rhodiola, and others. Some adaptogenic supplements are more calming. Some will be more stimulating. Talk to a knowledgeable health food store representative to see which product will suit your needs.

Practice good sleep hygiene. Sleep and stress go together. If we don’t get a good night’s sleep, we are likely to be more stressed. Set a sleep time and stick to it as best you can. Prepare your brain and body for sleep. Turn off your screens just before bed, read a chapter in a book, or meditate for a few minutes instead of playing another episode. I also recommend taking a nightly magnesium supplement to aid in deep sleep.

At this point, “normal” is a change, and our brains are not as capable of changing. It’s okay to be stressed out. It’s okay to go slowly. Life has been strange for so long that maybe getting back to normal is even stranger, and that’s fine. Go at your own pace. Do what feels safe to you. Stress is stress, and even if it feels a little silly or strange to be stressed out to get our normal daily routine back, your stress is still valid. Sleep, be mindful, support your adrenal glands, get vaccinated if you haven’t, or at least speak to your doctor about it if you have any questions or concerns. We are all involved together, even if we all proceed at our own pace.

Travis Lemon is a certified herbalist and co-owner of Tulsi at The Market in Huntington. He has been in the natural healing and wellness industry for over 14 years. He can be reached at travislemonmh@gmail.com.

Three steps to cut back your stress about cash

Women are stressed out about money, not least thanks to the Covid 19 pandemic. This is according to a recent survey by Fidelity which found that 70% of women are stressed out about their long-term savings and investments.

Fidelity interviewed 1,902 U.S. adults, including 951 women, to investigate the financial impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on women.

Overall, 60% of women surveyed say they were much more stressed during the pandemic, with a number of factors contributing to their stress. These factors include their children’s emotional and mental well-being, everyday finances, and long-term savings.

Additionally, Almost 40% of women are considering cutting their hours or leaving the workforce The survey found that the responsibility for caring has increased.

Even so, many women take steps to take control of their finances. Fidelity saw a 41% year-over-year increase in women using Fidelity services alone rather than through their employer.

To help clients manage their finances and reduce their money-related stress, Fidelity recommends three key steps.

1. Build emergency savings

If there is one thing that can be learned from the pandemic, it is important to have a pillow of emergency money on hand.

First, build up enough emergency savings to cover expenses for three to six months, says Lorna Kapusta, head of women and loyalty at Fidelity Investments. It is important that these funds are readily available to insure you in the event of a job loss or an unexpected emergency, she adds.

Some women choose to put aside One year worth of expenses because it makes them feel more comfortable, says Kapusta. That’s fine too. Make sure your plan works the best for you and your goals.

2. Try to save more than 10% of your salary for retirement

It’s never too early to retire. Contribution to a Employer Sponsored 401 (k) Plan This option now allows you to put away part of your salary and defer paying taxes on those savings until you withdraw them when you retire. It is also likely that your employer will offer you a match for a certain percentage of your contributions, which is essentially free money.

If you can’t save the recommended 15% of your salary right away, start with what to put aside. However, try to save at least 10% of your income.

Women who save 10% of their salary or more felt less stressed about their financial future, Kapusta says. And saving 15% of your salary during your career should help you meet the recommended goal of saving 10 times your salary for retirement, Kapusta adds.

If you don’t have access to an employer-sponsored 401 (k) plan, there are other retirement accounts that can help you plan for the future and get tax benefits, such as: B. traditional or Roth IRAs.

3. Create a roadmap for your goals

No matter how high or small your salary is, you should always develop a financial plan or roadmap for yourself or with your partner, Kapusta says.

“The idea is to know what you want today in five years and have an idea of ​​where you want to be 30 years from now,” she explains. “And then you set up your money to achieve those goals.”

Regardless of your goals, having a plan can help you better manage your finances and stay on track to meet those goals. That goes for everything from short-term goals like big purchases to long-term goals like buying a home.

“Knowing where your money is, what you owe, and how it works for you has significantly reduced women’s stress levels about their finances,” says Kapusta.

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Much less Stress, Extra Cash: How you can Pull Off Your Dream Retirement

Many seniors retire and get miserable early. The reason? Money worries.

Adjusting for a steady income is not an easy task, and many older Americans struggle financially when they realize the cost of retirement. If you’d rather avoid that fate and instead leave your final years behind, here are three important steps to take.

Image source: Getty Images.

1. Research your costs

It is easy to assume that your cost of living will remain largely the same after you leave the workforce, especially if you plan to maintain a lifestyle similar to what you are used to. However, you may be forgetting one important issue: health care. This is the only thing that is likely to cost a lot more as you age. Knowing what to expect can help you avoid unpleasant financial surprises.

HealthView Services, a cost projection software provider, estimates the average healthy 65-year-old married couple who retire in 2021 will spend more overall $ 662,156 on medical care in retirement. Separate data from the Seniors’ League shows that 66% of today’s seniors spend more than $ 375 per month on healthcare.

Plan for these expenses so that your retirement budget is not affected. A good bet is to fund a Health savings account during your working years if you are eligible. Enrollment depends on high deductible health insurance that meets other requirements.

2. Save from an early age

Retiring with a sturdy nest egg is a great way to keep your financial concerns to a minimum. And saving at a young age could be your ticket to a hefty pile of cash.

Indeed, you can amass a large sum of wealth even if you are an average earner. If you have $ 500 a month in one Retirement plan If you have an average annual return of 7% for 45 years (more on that in a moment), you will make over $ 1.7 million. Start saving 10 years later and you will be looking at roughly $ 830,000 if all other things are the same.

3. Invest aggressively while you can

Taking some risk in your IRA or 401 (k) can result in great returns. So it pays to buy high stocks throughout your career. As retirement approaches you should definitely try switching to safer investments like bonds, but for the majority of your savings window, stocks really are the way to go.

In the example above, we saw that an average annual return of 7% helped increase 45 Years of Monthly Contributions from $ 500 to $ 1.7M. This 7% is slightly below the stock market average.

Now watch what happens if we apply a 5% return, which is far more conservative. Suddenly that balance drops from $ 1.7 million to $ 958,000. That’s still a fair bit of money, but it doesn’t give you the same financial security as $ 1.7 million.

Don’t let money problems ruin your retirement

If you want to spend your last few years not having a boss to report to, you will have to adjust to this during your time on the staff. This means finding out how much income you will need in retirement, saving at a young age, and investing your money wisely.

Do these things, and chances are you won’t be referring to them at all when your retirees groan about the ever-increasing cost of milk.