Wooden County Fee to carry public listening to on stimulus cash

PARKERSBURG, W.Va. (WTAP) – Later this month, Wood County residents will have the opportunity to share their views on how the district commission is supposed to spend money under the American Recovery Act.

The district commission announced last week that a public hearing would be held on Monday, August 23 at 5:30 p.m. in Judge Donald F. Black’s annex in downtown Parkersburg.

Wood County received $ 16 million from the American Recovery Act, which was approved by Congress in February.

Federal law requires the money to be used for projects related to the pandemic. But the district commission wants to hear the concerns of the citizens.

“I think every project will be worth listening to,” said Commission President Blair Couch. “Every idea is worthy. Some projects may not fit into the American Recovery program, and some projects will if we have additional funding outside of those funds. But if it’s a great idea, it’s a great idea. “

The municipalities have until the end of 2024 to spend the money.

Wood County has already made plans for a multi-purpose community building on the site of the now demolished county jail, a multi-purpose community building, and a relocation of the district’s 911 center.

She seeks legal advice for other projects and holds interviews with candidates for a financial advisor.

Copyright 2021 WTAP. All rights reserved.

Syracuse colleges unveil plan for spending $109 million in stimulus cash

Syracuse, NY – The Syracuse School District will spend most of its $ 109 million Stimulus money about trying to bring kids up to speed after the pandemic year.

Suzanne Slack, the district chief financial officer, presented the details at a Wednesday education committee meeting. The district has three years to spend and must come up with a specific plan by August 31.

That to plan Slack revealed that the district’s education committee on Wednesday was broad, but contained dollar amounts.

The largest item is $ 55.2 million for learning acceleration. That includes $ 20.7 million for an intensive math program, $ 11.7 million for an intensive reading program, $ 12.1 million for the summer school, and $ 7.7 million for a virtual academy for all interested high school students.

School officials had hoped the virtual academy would be available to students earlier this school year, but it’s not clear if it will be ready in such a short time, Slack said. The district is still waiting to hear from the state whether it needs to provide virtual options for all students and other opening policies that would affect the academy’s plans.

Approximately $ 24 million of federal money is spent on coping with social and emotional problems facing children. This includes funds for hiring counselors and contracts with therapists. The district is also rolling in $ 2.3 million to improve participation in this plan.

Air quality in the district’s 33 schools, a problem long before the pandemic, will also get a boost. The plan provides $ 13 million to improve air quality and safety. Of this, $ 8 million will be used to replace windows in multiple schools. Buildings will also get new heating and air conditioning controls, additional air purifiers, and new filters for the air purifiers purchased last year.

The district will use the remainder of the money to buy more computers and WiFi hotspots: $ 9.5 million will be used for computers and $ 3.1 million for hotspots. The plan doesn’t say how many of the two will be purchased.

The county has three years to spend the money. Slack said about $ 40 million will be spent this year.

Slack also gave some details on how the district will spend $ 48 million, which it receives from another pot of federal funds, the Covid Relief and Response Supplemental Appropriations Act (CRRSA). The district has two years to spend this money. The largest part, nearly $ 30 million, will be spent on hiring staff and contracts with therapists to help children with mental health problems.

Why little one tax credit score cash is not identical to extra stimulus money

School sales should get a boost after millions of families paid their first monthly child tax credit advance in July. Another monthly payment is also just around the corner on August 13th.

But before you add an extra pair of sneakers or a high-end backpack to the shopping cart, pay attention to the fine print.

For example, did you know that if they get more than they are actually due every month from July to December, some people have to pay back the money next year? Others might consider a much smaller tax refund than they would normally expect.

We have heard from many angry taxpayers as soon as the 2022 tax filing season begins, when those expecting extra high tax refunds end up with a much smaller payout – or even owe money.

The tax regime for the child credit is different from the last three stimulus payouts, where some individuals may have received extra money and not had to pay it back if they no longer qualify due to income or other factors.

“The IRS has made it clear that it is an upfront payment and if you are no longer eligible it will be repaid on your 2021 tax return,” said James O’Rilley, CPA and Tax Director of Doeren Mayhew in Troy.

The monthly cash outlay is an “advance payment” of what the Internal Revenue Service estimates based on your 2019 or 2020 income tax return, depending on which return has been processed by the IRS so far.

However, how much you can claim for the child tax credit will ultimately be calculated based on your income and your situation for 2021 when you file a return next year. Some Repayment protection are there for some who have limited income.

Now it’s important that people keep accurate records of what they received and when, said O’Rilley.

In January 2022, the IRS will send what is called a letter 6419 to indicate the total amount of advance child tax credit payments that have been paid to you that year.

Similar to the incentive payments that applied to returns in 2020, you need to match what you have already received against what you are entitled to.

Failure to reconcile prepayments, O’Rilley warned, could delay processing your tax return after it was filed in the next year, delay refunds, or convert a refund to a balance due.

While the message is out there, we all know that a lot of people just don’t focus on next year’s taxes in July and August. But some will regret it if they don’t.

As of July, millions of eligible families received up to $ 300 per month for each eligible child ages 5 and under and $ 250 per month for children ages 6-17. The monthly payouts run from July to December.

If your child no longer reaches credit in 2021, the IRS is likely to make some adjustments on their own. But tax experts say you may want to pursue that too. The IRS does not include a child who will turn 18 in 2021 towards your prepayment. And the IRS is expected to adjust the payment for a child turning 6 this year to $ 250 per month instead of $ 300.

Thanks to an expanded child tax credit, those who qualify and have an eligible child aged 5 and under could increase their credit from $ 2,000 to up to $ 3,600. About half of that money is slated to be paid out in 2021, the rest on tax returns in 2022. Income limits will keep some from receiving the credit.

You can stop the August payment if you meet the IRS August 2 deadline. If you miss this, you can opt out of payment in September as long as you meet the August 30th deadline.

You can opt out of future payments with the IRS, but the final deadline is November 29th. If you wait that long, you will only decline the December prepayment.

Who would like to unsubscribe?

Alison Flores, lead researcher at The Tax Institute at H&R Block, said there were essentially two reasons someone would turn down a chance at hundreds of dollars a month this year.

First, you rely on a huge tax refund every year and don’t want any upfront cash. You may be more concerned about getting the highest possible tax refund for the next year rather than getting extra cash now.

Second, your situation is no longer exactly the same as it was last year – and you may have to repay some of that prepayment or face a smaller refund in the next year.

“Depending on your situation, deregistering could help you avoid payments that may have to be paid back,” said Flores.

Families, of course, need to review their own finances and speak to their tax advisor to decide whether to continue receiving monthly child tax deduction payments or to decline future payments.

H&R block created an online resource that includes: Calculator to estimate payments. The IRS did Child tax credit information at IRS.gov.

The IRS notes that families may also want to get out if their primary residence was outside of the United States for more than half of 2021 – and they would no longer qualify for the loan.

How can you unsubscribe?

Go to IRS.gov and click on Advance Child Tax Credit Details. Then take a look “Manage Payments” Tool.

They would use what the IRS calls theirs Child tax credit update portal refuse to receive monthly payments.

“The IRS was pretty clear. In addition to being active, the opt-out portal is being used,” said Mark Steber, Jackson Hewitt’s chief tax information officer.

This is not a one-step, easy-to-use process. And honestly, you don’t want it so easy for the crooks to find a way to get their hands on your child tax deduction.

At the same time, however, there is concern that some people may not be able to simply opt out or give up after they hit the first roadblock or two. Take the time to understand the process.

Lots of people may need to create one new account via ID.me if they cannot log in with an existing IRS username.

The third-party system ID.me is now also used by dozens of countries to verify identity when applying for unemployment benefits to combat fraud.

You need a Phone with an account in your own name – not another person’s name. A smartphone, according to Steber, will make it easier for the third-party provider ID.me to send an SMS directly to you and speed up the process.

You’ll also need things like an email address, your social security number, and photo identification (driver’s license, passport, passport, or government ID).

Flores advises that both spouses must de-register separately when using joint registration status as spouses. If only one spouse signs out, you will receive half the payment.

You can’t log in again right now, she said, but the IRS expects this functionality to be ready by the end of September 2021.

Tax experts also point out that some people can adjust their tax withholding on their paychecks if they find the opt-out tool too overwhelming. Or others warn that you may want to set aside some of the prepayments – and not spend all of the money now – to fix possible tax problems in April.

What could lead to major tax problems?

Do you share custody? For example, let’s say you have two dependent children in 2020, but your ex-spouse will claim the children on the 2021 federal income tax return under your divorce settlement.

If so, one parent could pocket the prepayments now but will have to return all that money to the IRS next year – unless that parent refuses. If you have two children, ages 10 and 12, you might consider $ 500 a month – or $ 3,000 for six months – as prepayments.

If you are not the parent claiming the children to be dependent for 2021, you are not entitled to the child tax credit or any of the prepayments and you want to repay that money.

The risk of having to repay this money is higher if there are storage problems, said Steber.

More:So now you won’t receive any more money for the child tax credit and other tips

More:“Perfect Storm” causes delays in tax refunds and causes some problems

More:Big Bucks Should Arrive In July For Families: Here’s How To Get It

More:What to do now to avoid a nasty tax surprise next year

Will you make more money in 2021?

If you’ve made more money this year than you did last year, you may qualify for a much smaller loan. And it is possible that you will start receiving too much money at the start of the game.

Those who are gig workers or the self-employed often have a harder time estimating their tax bills – and many make estimated payments over the year. You may now want to reconsider taking the child tax prepayments. It can be even more important to discuss the situation here with a tax professional to avoid problems.

For example, to receive full credit as a single parent, you must qualify for tax return as a householder and your income can be US $ 112,500 or less.

If you are single and do not meet the requirements to be a Head of Household, your income must be $ 75,000 or less.

If you are married and file a joint statement, you are entitled to Full Benefit if your combined income is $ 150,000 or less.

For many families with higher incomes, smaller child tax credits will be available.

The base child tax credit of $ 2,000 per child remains in place and begins to expire at a modified gross adjusted income of $ 400,000 for spouse enrollment and $ 200,000 for other applicants.

The extended loan for 2021 adds the extra cash to the $ 2,000 for many families with more modest incomes.

Steber said it helps that the IRS only pays out up to half the possible loan, which essentially sets a cap on how much tax refunds could be reduced and how much money might have to be paid back by some.

ContactSusanne Tompor: stompor@freepress.com. Follow her on Twitter@tompor. To subscribe, please go to freep.com/specialoffer. R.Continue reading business and sign up for ours Business newsletter.

Stimulus cash eases COVID prices for De Soto Colleges | Native Information

The coronavirus pandemic has cost school districts a lot over the past year and a half, but De Soto School District has some economic relief.

The district’s education committee recently decided to accept $ 1.7 million from the Elementary and Secondary Education Emergency Fund (ESSER II) provided in the federal Coronavirus Response and Relief Supplemental Appropriations Act, which was provided by the U.S. Congress was adopted in December 2020.

The De Soto School District will receive the funds from the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education and use them to cover COVID-19-related costs incurred in the 2020-2021 school year.

All but $ 7,511.50 of the $ 1.7 million will be used to cover employee salaries, benefits and insurance costs caused by the pandemic, Superintendent Josh Isaacson said.

He said the federal government agreed last year to reimburse school districts for up to 10 days of employee lost work time due to quarantine, either after a positive COVID-19 test or due to contact tracing.

That clause ended in 2020, but Isaacson said the board decided to extend the agreement to pay employees if they need to be quarantined in the second half of the 2020-2021 school year, and the district will be ESSER II – Use funds to reimburse the district for their payment.

“We were in class while many other companies were able to allow their employees to work from home,” he said.

The reimbursement concerned teachers and administrative staff as well as canteen workers, bus drivers, nurses, caretakers and other auxiliary staff.

The ESSER II funds will also be used to reimburse the district for consumables it has purchased, such as cases of medical gloves, masks, and food service items.

Isaacson said about $ 130,000 was used to cover the costs COVID-19 placed on the district’s self-insured health insurance program.

“Since we are self-insured, we could cover some of these costs,” he said. “We had vaccination clinics. While COVID tests and vaccinations were free, insurance was billed for administration costs of $ 10 or $ 11 per test or vaccination. That helped. “

De Soto District previously received $ 520,000 from Emergency Fund I for elementary and secondary schools provided under the state’s Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act.

That money, administered by Jefferson County, was used to pay for hotspots and Chromebooks so students could study from home, Isaacson said.

He said the CARES law money also provided local grants for grants paid for plastic barriers and additional postage the district incurred for sending information to students and parents while the school was out of the way from March to May 2020 Operation was.

Petition requires 4th stimulus verify, however is extra aid cash coming? This is the most recent

The economic recovery and the introduction of the COVID-19 vaccine are two reasons why further aid is unlikely.

Angela Lang / CNET

A number of Internet hoaxes were circulating this month claiming a fourth stimulus payment is on the way. While some lawmakers called for additional stimulus money back in the spring, many now argue that it isn’t a priority due to signs of recovery after the lockdown – like Unemployment claims to its lowest level since last year. Still, there is a lot of public support for ongoing emergency relief. With over 2.6 million signatures, a Change.org petition notes, “The true unemployment rate for low-paid workers is estimated to be over 20%, and many people have faced heavy debts from last year for things like utilities, rent and childcare.”

The three stimulus checks helped families pay for household expenses and other needs during the pandemic. However, a fourth payment is not included Draft of a non-partisan infrastructure Plan or any of President Joe Biden’s recent economic proposals. One type of extra money that will benefit millions of families in 2021 is expansion Child tax deduction, with the first prepayment on July 15th. This year, even parents who don’t earn enough to pay income tax can get up to $ 300 per child per month.

So what is the fate of a fourth stimulus check? We’ll explain it below. As for other monetary matters, new rules on child tax credit give parents that Possibility to receive monthly advance checks for extra cash this year or a lump sum of up to $ 3,600 per child in 2022. That’s how it’s done Review your tax refund If you haven’t received it yet and what to know about it Tax relief in the event of unemployment. We have updated this story.

What happens to the $ 2,000 current check petition?

A stream Change.org petition which has garnered more than 2.6 million signatures, calls on Congress to send out a fourth monthly economic check for $ 2,000 for adults and $ 1,000 for children for the remainder of the pandemic. The petition states that “the recovery has not reached many Americans” and points to the need for immediate controls and recurring payments so “we can stay afloat”.

According to a recent study, the first three incentive controls helped reduce hardships such as food insufficiency and financial instability. So far, during the pandemic, eligible adults have received a maximum of $ 3,200 and children have received a maximum of $ 2,500. For many families in need, this is not enough to recover from a decline in wages and benefits. While Change.org’s petition is on the verge of becoming one of the most popular on their website, whether it will have any impact is another question.

What’s new about Washington’s stimulus money proposals?

Since the American rescue plan When the March Act passed, the White House proposed two packages – the American Jobs Plan and the American Families Plan – neither of which called for further stimulus packages. On June 3, a press conference at the White House indicated that efforts would be focused on the infrastructure spending package. Biden is “open to a number of ideas” regarding stimulation aid, so White House Press Secretary Jen Psakibut she also said he had already suggested what would be “most effective in the short term.”

The new reduced compromise of the bipartisan infrastructure agreement that the The White House announced on June 24th, contains nothing to do with “human infrastructure” – it is not about childcare, improved wages or vocational training. At the same time, the announcement states: “President Biden remains committed to the comprehensive agenda of the American Jobs Plan and American Families Plan.”

It has been a few months since the Democratic members of the House and Senate pleaded for another economic review. In late March, a group of lawmakers urged Biden to regular business stimulus payments in its next stimulus package. In May several members of the Committee on Ways and Means of the House made a similar request. Citing increasing poverty and rising American debt, they found that “most people spend relief checks on monthly expenses or essentials like groceries, utilities, rent, and mortgage payments.”


Running:
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Child Tax Deduction: Everything We Know

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What aid funds have already been spent in 2021?

The American Rescue Plan Act of March 2021 included three types of direct payments to individuals:

Stimulus checks: Incentive payments up to $ 1,400 has been spent on those who meet the requirements. It also goes to certain people in the form of money “plus-up” payments .

Child tax credit: A temporary extension of the Child tax deduction for 2021, send qualified families up to $ 3,600 for each child – you can Calculate your child tax credit Here. The partial prepayments started this month will run until the end of the year, with a final payment in 2022.

Federal unemployment benefit: One week $ 300 unemployment benefit has been extended to September 6, as has the pandemic unemployment benefit for gig workers and freelancers. However, more than half of the state governments have opted for it unsubscribe from the extended benefits before September 6, so that millions of unemployed Americans in these states were cut off from these funds by mid-June.

021-Cash-Stimulus-Bill-Help-Americans-Poverty-Last-Dollar-Ripped-Choice

So far, eligible U.S. families have received three stimulus checks amid the pandemic.

Sarah Tew / CNET

Will Congress approve more money before December?

There is a lot to consider when assessing the future of family economic aid. The White House could put extra money in Americans’ pockets in the following scenarios:

If this increases the child tax credit permanently: Money from the advanced Child tax deduction is scheduled to start this week with monthly payments to families with low and middle income children. In a July 7 speech on the Build Back Better Agenda for Working Families, Biden called for Extension of the extended child tax credit until 2025. Other aspects of the American family plan related to health care costs and sick leave also remain to be negotiated.

When there is a minimum wage increase: Some senators continue to look for ways to increase the federal minimum wagewhich is $ 7.25 an hour. Some proponents want to raise the bar to $ 15 an hour, while others want to hit just $ 11 an hour. In recent years, many federal states, municipalities and companies have implemented minimum wage increases above the national level. However, the discussion of a new national hourly rate of $ 15 has encountered an obstacle in recent months and the likelihood of it being rolled out anytime soon is slim.

If it extends federal unemployment benefits beyond the fall: Some legislators originally requested that federal unemployment benefits be extended beyond Labor Day. However, dozens of states already have it cut off advanced services early, and increased unemployment benefits are unlikely to continue beyond the expiration date in other states. On June 4, Biden pointed out that the temporary thrust in Unemployment benefits should expire At the beginning of September as planned.

In the meantime, here’s what to do if a Problem with your stimulus check. And we know that from about new IRS portals That will help you get money through the child tax credit checks that started on July 15th.

How will Northeast Ohio college districts spend $974 million in stimulus cash? Stimulus Watch

CLEVELAND, Ohio – Just as municipalities are receiving a once-in-a-generation injection of cash from the federal government, public K-12 schools and both private and public colleges are also receiving huge amounts of federal stimulus money through the American Rescue Plan.

Schools and colleges received money through previous coronavirus aid, including the CARES Act in March 2020 and the CRRSA Act in December 2020. But in most cases, they’re receiving considerably more from the American Rescue Plan – often about twice as much.

Public school districts and charter schools in Greater Cleveland – Cuyahoga, Geauga, Lake, Lorain, Medina, Portage and Summit counties – are receiving a total $974 million. By contrast, those schools received a combined $104 million under the CARES Act and $437 million from the CRRSA Act.

The money was divided based on enrollment and the number of students in low-income families, so large districts in urban areas are receiving the most. Cleveland Metropolitan School District is receiving $293 million. Akron Public Schools is getting $96 million.

How much is your district getting? A full list by county can be found at the bottom of this article.

Schools have until September 2024 to spend the money, which comes with few strings. The U.S. Department of Education wanted to give districts flexibility. So, the only restriction is that at least 20% of district funds should “address learning loss through the implementing evidence-based interventions and ensuring that those interventions respond to students’ social, emotional and academic needs and address the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on underrepresented student subgroups.”

Administrators now face an unfamiliar problem: What should we do with all this money?

“This infusion of federal monies is historic in size,” said Ryan Pendleton, CFO and treasurer for Akron Public Schools. “There’s really no other comparison of an investment and public education that we’ve ever seen in this size and scope, but it comes with great responsibility.”

A balancing act between innovation and sustainability

The stimulus funds are one-time-only, so districts are wary of creating programs they’d have to figure out how to pay for afterward.

“The new money is incredibly welcomed, and also a little bit tricky,” said Eric Gordon, CEO of the Cleveland Metropolitan School District. “There are a lot of organizations across the country counseling school districts not to make long-term investments with one-time money because of the cliff that’s created.”

CMSD, for example, is considering expanding its art, music and physical education programs, so students can learn an instrument, make pottery or join a fitness class. But in a few years, when the money that’s paying for those teachers is gone, what happens to those programs?

“What we’re trying to do is make those investments now, bank our local dollars for as long as we can, but at some point, say to our community, ‘Here’s what we’ve been able to give you post-pandemic. Cleveland, are we willing to pay for it when the time comes?’”

Phillip Lovell, associate executive director at the Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit Alliance for Excellent Education, said making the best use of these funds is a challenge for education leaders, who are understandably exhausted after navigating the past year and a half.

“We’re not going to recover academically from the pandemic just this summer, or even just next school year,” Lovell said. “We have to see this as a long-term strategy where we are making different use of the school day, making different use of the school time, making different use of community resources, and seeing this as a multi-year recovery effort, not just an overnight effort.”

Lovell said schools should consider innovative approaches to traditional programs and methods of addressing learning loss. Instead of typical summer school, districts could partner with summer camps to offer more enticing and enriching experiences. Strategies for reengaging high schoolers, especially seniors, could include offering free childcare during the school day. And to encourage students to apply to college, high schools could hold campaigns for students to complete the FAFSA.

A major part of helping students recover academically is also taking care of their social and emotional needs, Lovell said.

“We have to meet the comprehensive needs of students. We want our young people to thrive, and in order to thrive, that means they need to be physically healthy, they need to be emotionally healthy, and then that contributes to being academically successful,” Lovell said. “It’s not one or the other.”

Similarly, the Brookings Institute published an article urging local leaders to use American Rescue Plan money to support “playful learning landscapes,” which allow school-age children to fill in achievement gaps in cognitive and social skills through interactive installations and activities.

The U.S. Department of Education agrees, with its requirements for districts to focus on addressing academic, social and emotional needs, with particular attention toward students in historically underrepresented groups.

“We need to need to emerge from the pandemic, with stronger systems than we have going into it. And that means, you know, we shouldn’t press pause,” Lovell said. “What can we do that will help to solve both the immediate problems that have arisen from COVID, as well as the problems that have already been that have always existed?”

How do some local districts want to spend the money?

Cleveland.com and The Plain Dealer reached out to a handful of district leaders in Northeast Ohio to learn how they want to spend their American Rescue Plan money. Here’s what they said:

Rocky River City Schools

Treasurer Greg Markus said the bulk of the district’s $1.5 million will go toward its tutoring staff, including hiring an additional full-time tutor, bringing the total to about 25 full-time and two part-time. The tutors were previously paid for with Title I dollars and out of the district’s general fund. But with the district’s failed tax increase in May, stimulus has bought the district time and allowed them to maintain and bolster its tutoring services, Markus said.

“We had used some of our previous [stimulus] money for technology and we’ve used it for additional counseling, but with this bucket of money, we’ve really shifted to direct learning loss support,” Markus said.

Parma City Schools

Superintendent Charles Smialek wants to spend most of the district’s $22 million on addressing students’ social and emotional needs. Parma added a guidance counselor at each high school, now up to five or six per school. They also added a new position of one “home liaison” to each middle school. The position is similar to a guidance counselor but more focused on social-emotional aspects, including running support groups and connecting parents with resources in the community. The district also added more board-certified behavioral analysts to the elementary schools, bringing the total to seven.

“Obviously, there’s learning loss, certainly, but you have to look at the whole child,” Smialek said. “There’s also a need to make sure that we have better resources and better supports in place for students who may have experienced quite a bit of trauma, or just family adversity throughout the pandemic.”

To address learning loss, Parma is seeking to hire more teachers to decrease the average class size. Classes used to range from 25 to 28 students – 28 in the older grades and 25 in the younger grades, “but quite frankly, it would often go above that,” Smialek said.

The stimulus money is allowing Parma – which has also faced failed tax requests recently — to set targets for student to teacher ratios, at 20:1 in kindergarten and first grade, 22:1 in second grade, 24:1 for grades three and four and 26:1 for grades five, six and seven.

The district also used stimulus money to offer free summer school this year; about 800 students are enrolled for either intervention or enrichment, Smialek said.

Akron Public Schools

Pendleton, the district’s CFO, said plans are still in flux given the large amounts of money and responsibility. Plus, the district just came under new leadership. Christine Fowler-Mack took over as superintendent on July 1, succeeding David James who led the district for 13 years.

“She (Fowler-Mack) completely understands the opportunity and responsibility of this money,” Pendleton said. “Not speaking for her, but she already has a clear vision around student achievement, equity, stakeholder engagement, how can we leverage our facilities, and then the human capital to support those initiatives. She’s made those clear, and I think over the next couple of board meetings, she will be sharing that vision and timeline.”

District officials have been consulting with employees, students and their families and some of the hundreds of organizations that partner with the district in brainstorming how best to spend the money.

“We’ll still use some of that $96 million to cover COVID-related expenses, increased social distancing requirements, increased bus routes, increased staff to create lower class sizes to accommodate for that,” Pendleton said. “So, there’s still be some day-to-day expenses that I think would qualify for those monies. But the future, innovative kind of response to COVID – those plans are ongoing.”

Cleveland Metropolitan School District

Gordon listed ways the district is seeking to spend its $293 million:

  • Offering additional summer programming. More than 8,400 students are in summer sessions this year, which provide opportunities to catch up on unfinished learning, to engage in enrichment projects and enjoy activities such as athletics, band, chess, climbing walls – “anything that gets kids reactivated with their friends and making new friends,” Gordon said.
  • Expanding art, music and physical education programs.
  • Extending the length of the school day by 50 minutes for pre-K through eighth grade. High schools are not formally extending the day, but since students ride RTA to and from school, the district is able to provide before- and after-school opportunities that fit in their flexible transportation schedule.
  • Running activity buses so students can stay after school or come early to engage in other out-of-school-time activities.
  • Providing a health professional in every building. Before the pandemic, the district had nurses that served multiple buildings.
  • Remaining a 1:1 district by providing each student with a computer device and internet connection at home.
  • Improving facilities that have aging HVAC systems or need doors or windows replaced.
  • Hiring students and parents to help locate students that “kind of dropped out during the pandemic” and get them reengaged in school.

On the last point, Gordon said it’s hard to estimate how many students have gone off the radar, but said it’s in the thousands.

“We think there’s probably 3,000 or 4,000 kids that- just like, pre-K and K students, just didn’t come. So we’ve got to go get those kids and get them engaged this year because the parents kept them home last year. High school students: while they were on the rolls, they got jobs, like Amazon, and so they weren’t actively engaged in our classes. Are they dropped out? We don’t know. When school starts, are they going to show up? We don’t know.”

High school students are being paid to reach out to their peers, and through a partnership with the teachers union, some of their members who were not working this summer were hired to make phone calls, knock on doors and make home visits.

Cuyahoga County district/school Type ARP funding
Albert Einstein Academy for Letters, Arts and Sciences-Ohio Community School $638,421.28
Apex Academy Community School $4,136,079.83
Bay Village City Traditional District $864,977.29
Beachwood City Traditional District $889,788.97
Bedford City Traditional District $9,928,542.89
Bella Academy of Excellence Community School $1,756,374.26
Berea City Traditional District $9,357,345.41
Brecksville-Broadview Heights City Traditional District $2,150,077.93
Broadway Academy Community School $4,050,552.42
Brooklyn City Traditional District $3,435,070.58
Chagrin Falls Exempted Village Traditional District $367,545.84
Citizens Academy Community School $2,442,233.49
Citizens Academy Southeast Community School $2,115,249.97
Citizens Leadership Academy Community School $1,262,666.08
Citizens Leadership Academy East Community School $3,455,371.42
Cleveland Academy for Scholarship Technology and Leadership Community School $1,295,961.78
Cleveland Arts and Social Sciences Academy Community School $2,360,419.47
Cleveland College Preparatory School Community School $2,190,843.29
Cleveland Heights-University Heights City Traditional District $17,003,014.81
Cleveland Municipal Traditional District $293,152,902.47
Cleveland Preparatory Academy Community School $909,956.62
Constellation Schools: Eastside Arts Academy Community School $836,382.98
Constellation Schools: Madison Community Elementary Community School $2,082,898.47
Constellation Schools: Old Brooklyn Community Elementary Community School $1,373,244.82
Constellation Schools: Old Brooklyn Community Middle Community School $903,784.32
Constellation Schools: Parma Community Community School $3,083,666.44
Constellation Schools: Puritas Community Elementary Community School $1,070,494.12
Constellation Schools: Puritas Community Middle Community School $979,434.85
Constellation Schools: Stockyard Community Elementary Community School $1,709,912.99
Constellation Schools: Stockyard Community Middle Community School $427,072.20
Constellation Schools: Westpark Community Elementary Community School $1,500,282.05
Constellation Schools: Westpark Community Middle Community School $906,735.63
Constellation Schools: Westside Community School of the Arts Community School $2,113,600.15
Cuyahoga Heights Local Traditional District $649,532.72
East Academy Community School $2,264,842.54
East Cleveland City School District Traditional District $18,840,030.73
East Preparatory Academy Community School $1,641,665.41
Euclid City Traditional District $22,474,818.76
Euclid Preparatory School Community School $1,923,208.52
Fairview Park City Traditional District $1,929,992.85
Frederick Douglass High School Community School $588,866.31
Garfield Heights City Schools Traditional District $16,047,762.61
Global Ambassadors Language Academy Community School $1,069,386.48
Global Village Academy Community School $612,150.87
Green Inspiration Academy Community School $1,655,930.51
Harvard Avenue Performance Academy Community School $2,375,359.02
Hope Academy Northcoast Community School $2,149,700.49
Hope Academy Northwest Campus Community School $1,565,957.28
Horizon Science Acad Cleveland Community School $2,490,836.37
Horizon Science Academy-Cleveland Middle School Community School $2,458,642.73
Horizon Science Academy-Denison Middle School Community School $2,175,328.78
Huber Heights Preparatory Academy dba Parma Academy Community School $354,623.98
Independence Local Traditional District $608,307.51
Intergenerational School, The Community School $1,350,791.34
Invictus High School Community School $1,353,991.50
Lake Erie College Preparatory School Community School $2,040,029.26
Lake Erie International High School Community School $893,070.69
Lakeshore Intergenerational School Community School $833,958.60
Lakewood City Traditional District $10,651,949.25
Lincoln Park Academy Community School $2,812,672.06
Maple Heights City Traditional District $17,167,615.86
Mayfield City Traditional District $2,748,069.77
Menlo Park Academy Community School $928,682.55
Near West Intergenerational School Community School $1,111,592.34
Noble Academy-Cleveland Community School $2,006,311.09
North Olmsted City Traditional District $7,226,453.71
North Royalton City Traditional District $2,732,835.81
Northeast Ohio College Preparatory School Community School $3,412,502.21
Ohio College Preparatory School Community School $1,911,620.16
Ohio Connections Academy, Inc Community School $9,698,169.95
Old Brook High School Community School $936,327.98
Olmsted Falls City Traditional District $1,887,691.71
Orange City Traditional District $1,562,468.53
Orchard Park Academy Community School $1,260,538.57
Parma City Traditional District $22,143,701.98
Pinnacle Academy Community School $3,438,497.59
Promise Academy Community School $694,537.02
Regent High School Community School $839,278.62
Richmond Heights Local Traditional District $2,108,595.76
Rocky River City Traditional District $1,563,922.06
Shaker Heights City Traditional District $6,490,394.62
SMART Academy Community School $640,980.23
Solon City Traditional District $2,708,431.89
South Euclid-Lyndhurst City Traditional District $7,649,545.15
STEAM Academy of Warrensville Heights Community School $1,415,601.49
Stepstone Academy Community School $1,844,614.56
Strongsville City Traditional District $4,216,084.19
Summit Academy Community School-Parma Community School $1,107,631.72
T2 Honors Academy Community School $671,466.15
University of Cleveland Preparatory School Community School $2,236,165.52
Village Preparatory School Community School $4,495,506.07
Village Preparatory School Willard Community School $2,964,569.68
Village Preparatory School:: Woodland Hills Campus Community School $4,399,394.78
Warrensville Heights City Traditional District $10,160,409.87
Washington Park Community School Community School $1,420,595.92
West Park Academy Community School $1,940,528.41
West Preparatory Academy Community School $1,591,903.80
Westlake City Traditional District $3,316,048.49
Wings Academy 1 Community School $1,717,641.90
Geauga County district Type ARP funding
Berkshire Local Traditional District $1,392,573.21
Cardinal Local Traditional District $3,402,474.14
Chardon Local Traditional District $1,754,178.89
Kenston Local Traditional District $945,618.11
West Geauga Local Traditional District $1,094,193.18
Lake County district/school Type ARP funding
Fairport Harbor Exempted Village Traditional District $800,456.42
Kirtland Local Traditional District $580,215.64
Madison Local Traditional District $3,133,574.34
Mentor Exempted Village Traditional District $4,958,850.33
Painesville City Local Traditional District $8,656,906.52
Perry Local Traditional District $1,247,724.39
Riverside Local Traditional District $955,699.94
Summit Academy Community School – Painesville Community School $260,117.39
Wickliffe City Traditional District $1,863,469.01
Willoughby-Eastlake City Traditional District $7,786,596.36
Lorain County district/school Type ARP funding
Amherst Exempted Village Traditional District $2,643,995.66
Avon Lake City Traditional District $1,194,406.40
Avon Local Traditional District $1,387,011.09
Clearview Local Traditional District $3,486,571.62
Columbia Local Traditional District $959,318.20
Constellation Schools: Elyria Community Community School $1,638,427.64
Constellation Schools: Lorain Community Elementary Community School $840,122.64
Constellation Schools: Lorain Community Middle Community School $558,603.65
Elyria City Schools Traditional District $23,906,529.10
Firelands Local Traditional District $1,519,603.92
Horizon Science Academy Lorain Community School $4,922,307.91
Keystone Local Traditional District $1,517,237.45
Life Skills Center of Elyria Community School $566,173.95
Lorain Bilingual Preparatory Academy Community School $1,039,699.39
Lorain City Traditional District $37,387,126.37
Lorain Preparatory Academy Community School $3,391,217.65
Midview Local Traditional District $3,039,361.86
North Ridgeville City Traditional District $2,390,918.49
Oberlin City Schools Traditional District $1,959,747.49
Sheffield-Sheffield Lake City Traditional District $2,761,913.48
Summit Academy Community School Alternative Learners-Lorain Community School $637,502.97
Summit Academy School – Lorain Community School $753,111.91
Wellington Exempted Village Traditional District $1,250,786.83
Medina County district Type ARP funding
Black River Local Traditional District $1,913,275.34
Brunswick City Traditional District $4,204,911.33
Buckeye Local Traditional District $1,330,576.66
Cloverleaf Local Traditional District $2,237,551.11
Highland Local Traditional District $1,121,104.19
Medina City SD Traditional District $3,590,101.95
Wadsworth City Traditional District $2,614,850.98
Portage County district/school Type ARP funding
Aurora City Traditional District $926,189.62
Bio-Med Science Academy STEM School STEM $437,429.30
Crestwood Local Traditional District $1,557,179.92
Field Local Traditional District $1,934,001.57
James A Garfield Local Traditional District $1,556,813.52
Kent City Traditional District $5,498,556.80
Ravenna City Traditional District $6,036,986.90
Rootstown Local Traditional District $848,173.46
Southeast Local Traditional District $2,130,983.22
Streetsboro City Traditional District $1,941,783.72
Waterloo Local Traditional District $1,180,183.50
Windham Exempted Village Traditional District $1,564,477.72
Summit County district/school Type ARP funding
Akron City Traditional District $95,287,195.94
Akron Preparatory School Community School $1,445,528.77
Akros Middle School Community School $732,833.05
Alternative Education Academy Community School $6,199,781.35
Barberton City Traditional District $9,765,763.68
Case Preparatory Academy Community School $1,049,375.30
Copley-Fairlawn City Traditional District $1,934,049.51
Coventry Local Traditional District $2,247,620.07
Cuyahoga Falls City Traditional District $5,004,698.58
Edge Academy, The Community School $1,182,640.81
Greater Summit County Early Learning Center Community School $220,561.92
Green Local Traditional District $3,995,549.91
Hudson City Traditional District $1,280,941.89
Imagine Akron Academy Community School $17,426.12
Imagine Leadership Academy Community School $1,129,859.72
Life Skills Center of North Akron Community School $223,154.88
Main Preparatory Academy Community School $1,018,979.52
Manchester Local Traditional District $2,305,809.94
Middlebury Academy Community School $1,623,327.10
Mogadore Local Traditional District $763,297.22
Nordonia Hills City Traditional District $2,211,507.01
Norton City Traditional District $1,808,709.60
Revere Local Traditional District $869,086.03
Schnee Learning Center Community School $209,953.84
Springfield Local Traditional District $4,004,768.12
STEAM Academy of Akron Community School $1,173,099.47
Steel Academy Community School $464,291.91
Stow-Munroe Falls City School District Traditional District $3,098,711.38
Summit Academy Akron Elementary School Community School $730,866.91
Summit Academy Akron Middle School Community School $401,072.77
Summit Academy Secondary – Akron Community School $373,583.50
Tallmadge City Traditional District $2,596,678.03
Towpath Trail High School Community School $1,016,757.19
Twinsburg City Traditional District $2,607,312.85
Woodridge Local Traditional District $3,009,864.26

Note: Some readers on mobile devices may not be able to view the table of school funding.

4th stimulus cost replace, $2,000 examine petition and 2021 reduction cash. Right here is the most recent

The economic recovery and the introduction of the COVID-19 vaccine are two reasons why further aid is unlikely.

Angela Lang / CNET

During the first three rounds of Stimulus checks have helped many families Cover household expenses and meet other needs, a fourth payment is not on the short list of items to include The next big economic calculation from President Joe Biden. More help is on the way this week: On July 15, around 36 million eligible families will receive their first monthly advance payment of up to US $ 300 per child with the 2021 advance Child tax creditthat will bring immediate financial relief.

Some legislators had asked for more stimulus money in the spring. However, now many in Washington are arguing that given signs of economic recovery after the lockdown, this is less of a priority – like new unemployment claims to its lowest level since last year. At the same time, payment claims are gaining public support. With over 2.5 million signatures, a Change.org petition notes, “The true unemployment rate for low-paid workers is estimated to be over 20%, and many people have faced heavy debts from last year for things like utilities, rent and childcare.”

What does this mean for the fate of a fourth stimulus check? We’ll explain it below. As for other monetary matters, the government’s expansion of the child tax break gives parents the option of receiving monthly checks this year or a lump sum of up to $ 3,600 per child in 2022. That’s how it’s done Review your tax refund If you haven’t received it yet and what to know about it Tax relief in the event of unemployment. We keep updating this story.

What about the $ 2,000 recurring check petition?

A stream Change.org petition which has garnered nearly 2.6 million signatures, is calling on Congress to send out a fourth monthly economic check for $ 2,000 for adults and $ 1,000 for children for the remainder of the pandemic. The petition states that “the recovery has not reached many Americans” and points to the need for immediate controls and recurring payments so “we can stay afloat”.

According to a recent study, the first three incentive controls helped reduce hardships such as food insufficiency and financial instability. So far, during the pandemic, eligible adults have received a maximum of $ 3,200 and children have received a maximum of $ 2,500. For many families in need, this is not enough to recover from a decline in wages and benefits. While Change.org’s petition is on the verge of becoming one of the most popular on their website, whether it will have any impact is another question.

What about the proposals for stimulus money this year?

Since the American rescue plan When March became law, the White House proposed two packages – the American Jobs Plan and the American Families Plan – neither of which called for further stimulus packages. On June 3, a press conference at the White House indicated that efforts would be focused on the infrastructure spending package. Biden is “open to a number of ideas” regarding economic aid, White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki said:but she said he had already suggested what would be “most effective in the short term.”

The new reduced compromise of the bipartisan infrastructure agreement that the The White House announced on June 24th, contains nothing to do with “human infrastructure” – it is not about childcare, improved wages or vocational training. At the same time, the announcement states: “President Biden remains committed to the comprehensive agenda of the American Jobs Plan and American Families Plan.”

It has been a few months since Democratic members of the House and Senate called for another economic review. In late March, a group of lawmakers urged Biden to regular business stimulus payments in its next stimulus package. In May several members of the Committee on Ways and Means of the House made a similar request. Citing increasing poverty and rising American debt, they found that “most people spend relief checks on monthly expenses or essentials like groceries, utilities, rent, and mortgage payments.”


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What about aid funds that have already been approved?

The American Rescue Plan Act of March 2021 included three types of direct payments to individuals:

Stimulus checks: Incentive payments up to $ 1,400 has been spent on those who meet the requirements. It also goes to certain people in the form of money “plus-up” payments .

Child tax credit: A temporary extension of the Child tax credit for 2021, send qualified families up to $ 3,600 for each child – you can Calculate your child tax credit Here. These monthly installments, which start this month, run through the end of the year with a final payment in 2022.

Federal unemployment benefit: One week $ 300 unemployment benefit has been extended to September 6, as has the pandemic unemployment benefit for gig workers and freelancers (self-employed). However, more than half of state governments have chosen to unsubscribe from the extended benefits before September 6, so that millions of unemployed Americans in these states were cut off from these funds by mid-June.

021-Cash-Stimulus-Bill-Help-Americans-Poverty-Last-Dollar-Ripped-Choice

So far, eligible U.S. families have received three stimulus checks amid the pandemic.

Sarah Tew / CNET

Could Washington approve more money any other way?

There is a lot to consider when assessing the future of family economic aid. The White House could put extra money in Americans’ pockets in the following scenarios:

If this increases the child tax credit permanently: Money from the advanced Child tax credit is scheduled to start this week with monthly payments to families with low and middle income children. In a July 7 speech on the Build Back Better Agenda for Working Families, Biden called for Extension of the extended child tax credit until 2025. Other aspects of the American family plan related to health care costs and sick leave also remain to be negotiated.

When there is a minimum wage increase: Some senators continue to look for ways to increase the federal minimum wagewhich is $ 7.25 an hour. Some proponents want to raise the bar to $ 15 an hour, while others want to hit just $ 11 an hour. In recent years, many federal states, municipalities and companies have implemented minimum wage increases above the national level. However, the discussion of a new national hourly rate of $ 15 has encountered an obstacle in recent months and the likelihood of it being rolled out anytime soon is slim.

If it extends federal unemployment benefits beyond the fall: Some legislators originally requested that federal unemployment benefits be extended beyond Labor Day. However, dozens of states already have it cut off advanced services early, and increased unemployment benefits are unlikely to continue beyond the expiration date in other states. On June 4, Biden pointed out that the temporary thrust in Unemployment benefits should expire At the beginning of September as planned.

In the meantime, here’s what to do if a Problem with your stimulus check. And we know that from about new IRS portals That will help you get cash through the child tax credit checks, which start on July 15th.

Mayfield Heights considers utilizing American Rescue Plan cash to offer bonuses to metropolis workers who labored throughout pandemic: Stimulus Watch

MAYFIELD HEIGHTS, Ohio – A proposal to use federal stimulidollars to provide 4,000 bonuses to Mayfield Heights police officers and firefighters has turned into a potential bonus to all municipal and administrative employees deemed “material” and during the Pandemic worked.

City officials don’t have the money to spend. In fact, they haven’t even been told exactly how much money the city will receive from the American bailout plan over two years. But Estimates from cleveland.com and The Plain Dealer state Mayfield Heights could receive about $ 1.9 million in total.

Finance director Karen Fegan said the city is still considering how to spend its money. However, she confirmed that the proposal to provide bonuses to “all key workers” is being examined. She did not specify which positions are considered important or how many employees it involves, so it is unclear how much bonuses could be paid.

The city initially considered giving $ 4,000 in bonuses paid with American Rescue Plan money only to first responders, in addition to incremental pay increases – paid out of the city’s budget – as in collective agreements with unions, the police, and fire departments and other workers represented, negotiated.

Council members voted on the ordinances to sign the collective agreements during a meeting on May 24, partly due to disagreement over the bonuses and which city servants should receive them. Legislation empowering the mayor to approve the union contracts is back on the council’s agenda on Monday, but it’s unclear whether the agreements include bonuses.

“We talked about a lump sum instead of a percentage every year,” Councilor Gayle Teresi said at the May meeting. “We didn’t know there would be a lump sum and a percentage.”

Teresi said she is in favor of a raise for first responders given their necessary and 24/7 work during the pandemic. However, she was concerned about giving a bonus on top of the raise – especially since she heard city workers say that all employees who worked during the pandemic would receive a bonus, which would be paid in stimulus money.

“Someone who worked at City Hall called and told me everyone was getting a $ 4,000 bonus,” Teresi said. After the meeting, Teresi told a reporter that non-union city workers typically receive a similar raise to union workers, so she wondered who else could get a $ 4,000 bonus.

“Did the mayor (Anthony DiCicco) get it? Will (Finance Director) Ms. Fegan get it? How about some advice? We were there (work and hold meetings) during COVID, “Teresi said a freelancer for Sun Messenger, a sister publication of cleveland.com and The Plain Dealer.

The US Treasury Department has issued guidelines on how local governments can use their American Rescue Plan dollars. One of the proposals is to “provide premium wages for key workers to provide additional support to those who, as a result of their services in critical infrastructure sectors, face and will bear the greatest health risks”.

“I’m in favor of everyone getting a raise, especially the police and fire departments,” Councilor Robert DeJohn said during the May 24 session. “Here’s my problem: as soon as these two units get their raise, they get everyone else in town – everyone else, including the administrative staff. You will all get this lump sum up to the time you raise your salary. “

Councilor Donald Manno joined DeJohn and Teresi in May against the collective agreements. He said council members should receive a raise or bonus for signing raises for other employees.

“Mr. DeJohn said everyone in town gets the raise,” Manno said. “The council doesn’t get it, but we have to sign it for everyone else. We worked through COVID too – not the same way. But fact If you say that everyone in town hall gets a raise or a bonus, what about the advice? Are we stepchildren? Or what’s going on here? “

Finance director Fegan said compensation to the mayor and council will be determined by a regulation that includes a “nested” calculation based on factors such as increases in the general fund and the consumer price index for the previous year. But her statement didn’t seem to deter councilors hoping for a bonus or raise from the money from the American bailout.

Councilor Michael Ballistrea said he did not know why some of his colleagues were confused. He said notes he took during an earlier meeting suggested Fegan said some of the American bailout money would “most likely” be used for bonuses.

“So that was checked and it was always on the table that this should be done as far as I was concerned,” Ballistrea said.

Stimulus Watch is a public service journalism project run by cleveland.com and The Plain Dealer to track federal grants reaching Northeast Ohio through the US rescue plan. Read more undercleveland.com/stimulus-watch.

Tilman Fertitta says shopper spending will probably be robust even after stimulus fades

Tilman Fertitta, Chairman and CEO of Landry, told CNBC on Tuesday that he expected consumer spending to remain strong for the remainder of 2021, even if the Initial thrust The stimulus provided by Covid earlier this year is fading.

In an interview on “Power Lunch”, said the billionaire restaurateur and casino operator tax refunds sent to Americans and payouts from newly created child advance will provide tailwind.

“You will likely continue to see money pouring into the economy for the rest of the year,” said Fertitta, whose sprawling hospitality empire gives him an in-depth look at how Americans spend money.

“Then I think we’re going to lose some of those consumers, but we’re going to start taking back the business customers and the conferences and the big party rooms in New York and LA and all of your big cities,” added Fertitta, noting he still believes the US economy is “truly” heading for another Roaring Twenties, “for a while”.

As the US economy recovers from the pandemic stalemate and more Americans are vaccinated, consumers are recovering on a large scale.

Mid-June, Brian Moynihan, CEO of Bank of America, told CNBC that consumer spending at that point this year was 20% higher than it was in 2019. Moynihan noted that stimulus money was a factor in spending numbers based on the volume of transactions on its customers’ debit and credit cards, as well as the payment network Cell.

Right now, said Fertitta, the Houston-based Landry’s group’s more expensive restaurants see a distinct strength.

“The funny thing about consumers is that they like the high-end. It’s the high-end steakhouses, the high-end seafood restaurants, ”said Fertitta. “It’s not yours [Rainforest Cafes] and your bubba gumps. it’s your Mastro and … your Morton. “All four of these restaurant brands are under the Landry umbrella.

Fertitta said rising oil prices are one thing to watch because it can affect how Americans spend their money. On Tuesday, West Texas Intermediate Crude Oil Futures reach a level not seen since November 2014, was trading at just under $ 77 a barrel before turning negative in the session.

The current national average in gas prices is $ 3.134 per gallon as demand for the reductions picks up in the pandemic era. according to AAA. At that time last year, the national average was $ 2,180 per gallon.

“Then the consumer starts looking, ‘If I pay $ 5 for gasoline, I might not be able to shop at a restaurant or I might not make it all the way to a casino,’ so it can have a huge impact on us,” said Fertitta . “But then the flights go up, maybe people go to closer places. And that’s how I’ve seen it help us when the gasoline goes up, and I’ve seen it where it hurts us. “

It is too early to say what will happen this time, he said, “but you cannot have inflation and everything at the same time.”

IRS sending billions of stimulus {dollars} and plus-up funds. This is find out how to observe your cash

Stimulus check payments aren’t over yet for everyone. 


Sarah Tew/CNET

Next month’s child tax credit rollout might be consuming a lot of the IRS’s bandwidth these days, but the tax agency is still focused on sending weekly batches of the third stimulus checks. So far during the month of June, the tax agency has sent more than $6 billion in stimulus payments, with half coming as direct deposit and the other half as paper checks. Some of that money includes “plus-up” adjustments for people who received less money than they were supposed to get in earlier checks. 

Even though many of us got our stimulus money in the earlier batches in spring, some have had to wait weeks or months for their checks. The IRS sent money first to people who’d already filed their 2019 or 2020 tax returns because those were the easiest to verify. So if you’re still waiting for your stimulus check up to $1,400 — or think you might be due a plus-up payment — we’ll tell you what to do next. 

In the meantime, many experts say a fourth stimulus check is unlikely, but millions of families will be getting a good chunk of money with July’s first child tax credit payment. We can tell you how to know if you qualify and how much money you could expect over the course of the year. The IRS is also issuing unemployment tax refunds to millions of people who received jobless benefits last year, though payments are taking longer than expected. This story was updated recently.

Stimulus and plus-up payments are still being issued

The amount of money you got in your stimulus checks depends on a multitude of factors, including how much money you made for the year (this is your adjusted gross income), how many eligible kids you had and so on. This is the kind of information the IRS largely gets from your tax return, or from other sources of information if you don’t typically file taxes.  Since the third stimulus checks began arriving in the middle of tax season, the end result is that some people’s payments were calculated based on information the IRS had from last year, not from this year.

That means the IRS might owe you more money even if you already got a stimulus check. Let’s say you had a new baby or made less money. As part of the IRS processing your tax return, if it determines that you’re actually owed more than you got, the agency may send a plus-up payment. So far, the IRS has sent billions in payments this way. Given an extended tax due date (May 17 instead of the usual April 15), delays in processing tax returns and a backlog from last year’s tax returns, the IRS will likely be sending out plus-up payments through December.


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How to track your stimulus check online

With the IRS Get My Payment tool, you can get a daily update on your payment status. The online app can also alert you with a message if there’s a problem with your payment that you may need to address. Another option is to create an online account with the IRS, if you haven’t already. 

If you are sent a plus-up payment after your 2020 tax return is processed, the amount of your third payment will no longer show up on the tool, according to the IRS. In that case you will only see the status of your plus-up payment. 

If you expect your payment to come in the mail, you can use a free tool from the US Postal Service to track your mailed stimulus payment.

Stimulus check delivery start and end dates

First direct deposits made March 17
First paper checks sent Week of March 15
First EIP cards sent Week of March 22
First Social Security, SSI, SSDI payment sent Weekend of April 3, most arriving April 7
First plus-up payments Weekend of April 3
VA benefits for veteran nonfilers Week of April 14
IRS deadline to finish sending checks Dec. 31, 2021 (mandated by the bill)
Last date to receive a check January 2022 (if mailed checks sent late December)
Final claims for missing stimulus money 2021 tax season likely (in 2022)

What might be holding up your stimulus payment

Here’s some information on possible delays with your stimulus check and other problems you might encounter.

Update on a fourth stimulus check

Millions have been clamoring for recurring stimulus payments, and some lawmakers have expressed support for more relief aid through the pandemic. But President Joe Biden hasn’t pledged support to a fourth check, focusing instead on his proposed family and jobs packages and the recent infrastructure deal

In a press conference on June 3, White House press secretary Jen Psaki played down the possibility of a fourth stimulus check, asserting that the administration has already put forward an economic recovery plan. Through the debate in Washington over additional economic impact payments continues, it’s looking increasingly unlikely that there will be any more direct payments this year. 

If your third stimulus amount is less than expected

The IRS isn’t particularly big on communicating how much money it calculates for your stimulus check. You won’t find that figure in the agency’s online tracking tool, but you will see it in the confirmation letter you’ll receive in the mail. (And here’s why you got the payment size you did.) 

So what happens if you use our stimulus check calculator and notice the numbers seem way off, or the IRS letter quotes an amount you didn’t receive? Start by triple-checking your qualifications to make sure you’re eligible for the total you expect. Remember the IRS is automatically sending plus-up payments after the agency receives your 2020 tax return. If you had a baby or otherwise added a dependent in 2020, you won’t need to file an amended tax form to claim the supplement.

The IRS could open up claims for missing stimulus money before its Dec. 31 deadline to stop sending checks. If not, you might have to wait a year to claim it — when you file your 2021 taxes in 2022 (even if you’re a nonfiler who isn’t typically required to file taxes).

What to do if you’re missing money from the first two stimulus checks

Plus-up payments are going out weekly along with the third round of checks, but they may not be the only money you’re due. For money missing from the first two checks, you need to claim that on your 2020 taxes. We suggest making sure you know where to find your adjusted gross income. You may be eligible to claim the 2020 Recovery Rebate Credit for claiming missing money from the first two checks.

Also, last week, the IRS launched a new online for non-tax filer families called the “Non-filer Sign-up Tool.” Its purpose is to help eligible families who don’t normally file a tax return enroll in the monthly child tax credit advance payment program, which is slated to begin July 15. However, the tool is also for those who did not file either a 2019 or 2020 tax return and did not use the previous non-filers tool last year to register for stimulus payments. 

In other words, individuals who experience homelessness or make little or no income can use this tool to enter their personal details for the IRS to receive the $1,400 stimulus checks or claim the recovery rebate credit for any amount of the first two rounds of payments that might have been missed. Tax nonfilers may need to be proactive about claiming a new dependent, too.

How to notify the IRS of an issue with your stimulus check

The IRS doesn’t want you to call if you encounter a problem with the delivery or amount of your stimulus check. So what to do instead? Our guide walks you through how to report stimulus check problems, including checks that never arrived (try filing a payment trace), direct deposit payments that went to the wrong account and other issues.


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Don’t throw away the IRS letter about your stimulus payment

Hold on to that IRS letter that confirms your stimulus payment, including the amount and how the IRS sent your money. That letter from the IRS — Notice 1444-C — is your proof that the IRS sent a payment in case you don’t actually receive it or if you received less than you qualify for and need to claim the missing amount later. Here’s more on what to do with that IRS letter.

How taxes play a role in your stimulus payment amount

Taxes were due May 17. So how will the IRS figure out how much it owes you? It will calculate your total (you can also do that here) based on the most recent tax filing it’s processed when tabulating the amount of your stimulus check.

If you know your tax return was already processed, the amount of your stimulus check will likely be based on your 2020 adjusted gross income, not on your 2019 AGI. That presents complications if the difference between the two years disqualifies you from getting a third stimulus check

On the flip side, if the IRS uses your 2019 taxes and you’re owed more money based on your 2020 AGI and dependents, you could get a plus-up payment. If you got more than you’re owed, you’ll only need to return it to the IRS in some cases. 

When the stimulus checks will stop being issued 

Most of the third stimulus check payments have gone out from the IRS and US Department of the Treasury, based on the information the IRS has on hand to determine payment amounts. The March stimulus law, however, gives these federal agencies until Dec. 31, 2021, to send out all the third checks. That gives the IRS room to process 2020 tax returns and square up payments for those who are owed plus-up amounts, folks who filed for a 2020 tax extension and other groups, like people who moved or don’t have a fixed address (such as people experiencing homelessness).

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Millions could end up receiving a smaller stimulus check than they’re owed.


Sarah Tew/CNET

Other important information about stimulus checks

Stimulus checks aren’t necessarily a one-size-fits-all situation. Here are guides for: