State lawmakers urge Ohio Medicaid director to designate Summa Well being a ‘distressed hospital’ and supply cash for hiring extra workers

CLEVELAND, Ohio – A group of state lawmakers sent a letter on Wednesday asking the Ohio Department of Medicaid for more resources for Summa Health to hire more nurses to alleviate care bottlenecks caused by a surge in coronavirus cases Omicron variant were caused.

The letter to Ohio Medicaid director Maureen Corcoran said Summa Health, which operates two hospitals in Akron and Barberton, should be viewed as a “distressed hospital” eligible for more state and federal aid to help more nurses to adjust. The hospital system manages nearly 60% of all emergency rooms in Summit, Stark, Portage, and Medina counties.

The eleven lawmakers, seven Republicans and four Democrats, urged Corcoran to allocate money from the US dollars passed by lawmakers that year to help coronavirus.

“The Summa health system is in a state of crisis,” the letter said. “We urge you to use the resources that we supported in HB 169 to create the necessary state labor incentives so that our region can cope with this crisis.”

Summa Health President and CEO Cliff Deveny said he was aware of the letter and was in regular contact with four counties’ lawmakers and state officials. The strain on Summa Health’s ability to care for patients – both with and without coronavirus – has been caused by two main factors.

“It really is a function of the exposure to the number of COVID patients,” he said. “They stay about twice as long as a typical patient, so they use up a lot more resources. Since everyone has a problem with staffing, we spend a lot more on bonuses, overtime and temporary work. “

In the letter from the legislature, the fluctuation rate in the care sector was highlighted, which is almost 15.6% and is thus well above the fluctuation rate of 9.4% in 2019 before the start of the pandemic.

HB 169 provided US $ 124 million for “hospitals with critical access, rural hospitals, or hospitals in distress,” according to Corcoran. Summa Health manages more than 68% of all inpatient care for Medicaid recipients in the four counties.

The hospital system is also so overloaded that 30% of inpatient beds are occupied by coronavirus patients. The hospital system paused dialing operations December 6, redirecting its staff to emergency, surgical and critical care. Emergency room patients wait an average of 48 hours before bed.

According to the letter, the hospital system also manages 35% of positive coronavirus cases in hospitals across the region, 49% of patients in intensive care units, and 58% of patients who require a ventilator.

“You are essentially at a turning point,” said US State Representative Casey Weinstein, a Hudson Democrat. “It’s a combination of a surge in COVID patients, the vast majority of whom are unvaccinated, which honestly means that I am close to tending to my constituents.”

State Rep. Bill Roemer, a Republican from Richfield, said he hoped the letter would convince Corcoran to send additional money to offset Summa’s cost of hiring temporary nurses.

“We need the right funding,” he said. “Summa spends $ 180 an hour on visiting nurses. That’s the problem. We want to make sure that we can attract, retain, and adequately pay the current workforce we have so that we can address the problem. “

Deveny didn’t speculate on what could happen without help, but said Summa would expect even more hospitalizations, the peaks of which tend to lag behind the daily case numbers. The state reported more than 12,800 newly confirmed coronavirus cases on Wednesday, beating the daily record of 12,500 set on Tuesday. The hospital brought refrigerated trucks in case they needed extra space in the morgue.

“We are anticipating a larger wave of patients than we have now,” said Deveny.

Cleveland.com/The Plain Dealer has contacted Corcoran and the Department of Medicaid for comment.

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Southwest affords workers additional pay, frequent flyer miles to keep away from vacation journey disruptions

A bag handler pushes a bag near a Southwest Airlines plane at Hollywood Burbank Airport in Burbank, Calif., October 10, 2021.

Robyn Beck | AFP | Getty Images

Southwest Airlines On Saturday, its flight attendants offered new incentives to avoid further flight cancellations, especially during the main holiday season, amid staffing concerns, an internal memo said.

Southwest canceled more than 2,000 flights around Columbus Day weekend, disruptions the airline said cost it $ 75 million. American Airlines, which also offers flight attendants and other crews additional payment for vacation shifts, had to contend with mass cancellations of flights at the end of last month and also at the beginning of November.

Flight attendants, pilots and other operations staff could earn up to 120,000 Rapid Rewards points valued at more than $ 1,400. Flight attendants are entitled to work 36 days between November 15 and January 14, while cabin crews who work 28 days during that period could earn 60,000 points, the note said. Southwest said the number of qualifying shifts or days varies by work group.

The number of no-shows or unreachable flight attendants has risen recently, Southwest’s vice president of Sonya Lacore, vice president of in-flight operations, said in her message to cabin crew that was reviewed by CNBC. Sick calls have also increased when the company lifted emergency policies that required flight attendants to produce a medical certificate when they called sick. Lacore said, for example, when the airline last lifted these procedures on Nov. 9, two consecutive hours of sickness went from 20 to 90 an hour.

“We have a great opportunity here to maintain that commitment to you and her amid a difficult time for all of us,” wrote Lacore. “Our first step in addressing this and actively working to keep operations safe was to cut the schedule and we believe this incentive program will take us one more step in the right direction.”

The airline also offers ground operations workers triple pay for Thanksgiving and Christmas work, and double pay for overtime between November 17th and November 30th and December 17th through January 3rd. half salary.

The airlines had offered their employees early retirement packages and leave of absence to cut their labor costs during the pandemic, but were under staff shortages when demand picked up again this year. More flight attendants are returning from vacation to America and the Southwest, while these and other airlines are also aggressively hiring.

Southwest drops plan to place unvaccinated employees on unpaid go away

Travelers wait to check-in at the Southwest Airlines ticket booth at Baltimore Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport on October 11, 2021 in Baltimore, Maryland.

Kevin Dietsch | Getty Images

Southwest Airlines has abandoned a plan to put unvaccinated employees who have filed an application but have not received a religious or medical exemption on unpaid leave beyond a state deadline in December.

Southwest Airlines and American Airlines belong to the transport companies that are federal contractors and are subject to the Biden administrative obligation, against which their employees must be vaccinated Covid-19 until December 8th, unless exempted for medical or religious reasons. The rules for state contractors are stricter than this expected for large companies, which enables regular Covid tests as an alternative to a vaccination.

Executives of both airlines have been trying in the past few days to reassure employees about job security under the mandate and asking them to apply for exemptions if they cannot be vaccinated for medical or sincere religious beliefs. Airlines are expected to ask more questions about the mandate when the quarterly results are released on Thursday morning. Pilot unions tried to block the mandates or looked for alternatives such as regular tests.

Southwest’s Senior Vice President of Operations and Hospitality, Steve Goldberg, and Vice President and Chief People Officer Julie Weber, wrote to employees on Friday that if employees’ requests for an exception are not approved by December 8th, they will continue to work in accordance with the mask and spacing guidelines until the request has been verified.

The company gives employees until November 24 to complete their vaccinations or apply for an exemption. It will continue to pay them while the company reviews their requests, saying that it will allow the rejected individuals to continue working “while we coordinate with them on whether the requirements (vaccine or valid accommodation) are met”.

“This is a change from what was previously communicated. Initially, we communicated that these employees were taking unpaid leave and that is no longer the case,” they wrote on the CNBC-verified note.

Southwest confirmed the policy change, which comes just weeks before the deadline.

United Airlines implemented its own vaccine mandate in August, a month before the government rules were announced. United had told employees that if they were given exemptions, they would take unpaid leave. More than 96% of the employees are vaccinated. Some employees sued the company for unpaid leave, and a federal judge in Fort Worth, Texas has temporarily prevented the airline from proceeding with its plan.

American CEO Doug Parker met with union leaders Thursday to discuss vaccination exemptions.

American Airlines management “indicated that, contrary to United’s approach, they are looking for accommodations that allow employees to keep working,” said the Association of Professional Flight Attendants, the union that directs American flight attendants Airlines represents, in a notice to members Monday. “You have not given any information about what such accommodations might look like at that time.”

Hundreds of Southwest employees, customers and other protesters demonstrated against the vaccination mandate outside Southwest Airlines’ headquarters in Dallas on Monday, the Dallas Morning News reported.

An airline spokeswoman said the airline was aware of the demonstration.

“Southwest recognizes various positions regarding the Covid-19 vaccine and we always support and will continue to support the right of our employees to speak up by having open lines of communication to share problems and concerns” , she said.

Southwest’s Goldberg and Weber advised employees that if their application for exemption is denied, employees can reapply if the employee “has new information or circumstances that the company should consider”.

Southwest is demanding that new hires be vaccinated, as is American Airlines for new staff for mainline operations, spokesmen said.

Delta Airlines is also a federal contractor who is subject to state requirements but does not yet require vaccinations for staff. Last week the carrier reported that about 90% of the approximately 80,000 employees are vaccinated. In August, Delta announced that unvaccinated workers would start Pay $ 200 more a month for company health insurance in November.

RSS says federal cash will not be long-term answer for workers pay – Salisbury Put up

SALISBURY – Rowan-Salisbury Schools received an unprecedented amount of federal funding over the past year, but funding will only go so far as to keep the district’s staff competitive.

In total, the district raised $ 96.9 million in federal funds. The amount is spread across approximately $ 70.6 million in COVID-19 aid and a federal grant of $ 26.3 million granted in 2020 to advance renewal plans.

The district has some of the least competitive salaries for its employees when compared to comparable school districts. In June, Superintendent Tony Watlington collapsed where the district landed. Teachers, teaching assistants, caretakers and bus drivers are at the bottom of the lists in eight or nine districts.

The employees are roughly divided into certified and classified categories. Certified employees include faculties such as teachers and school principals. The classified employees include bus drivers, nutrition workers, maintenance and teacher assistants.

During the school committee meeting last week, Watlington briefly touched on the subject, noting that the district lags not only behind the more affluent surrounding districts in terms of pay for classified staff, but also behind comparable districts.

A bus driver for RSS starts at $ 12.07 per hour while a starting bus driver for Davidson County starts at $ 16.07 per hour. A salary study for classified employees is ongoing.

RSS chief finance officer Carol Herndon said it is rare for a salary study to return whose results show pay should stay the same. It is likely that the district will need to implement the study in a phased manner rather than implementing its recommendations in a single year, Herndon said.

Chief Operational Officer Anthony Vann said the district is struggling to recruit and hold classified positions under its umbrella. He said there were several reasons. Pay is one. Another is the high level of competition from private companies and other school districts for people with the skills RSS is looking for. The COVID-19 pandemic also contributes to this.

While demand fluctuates, Vann cited the example of around 50 vacancies in a workforce of 200 nutritionists. Central Office nutritionists and other RSS staff work in cafeteria lines in schools, much like staff who stand in as substitute teachers to make up for lengthy teacher absences.

Vann said he has lost several very skilled employees to the surrounding counties and sees companies in the city offering signing rewards.

“It makes it difficult to keep qualified staff unless you can compete with them,” said Vann.

Where the county will find the funding for the raise is still open, but there are a few options.

Why not the federal money?

Some of the federal aid money will go into the pockets of the faculty and staff, but it will not provide the county with a solution to long-term funding goals for the people who work there for two reasons: used to pay staff, and it will run out of money too .

The aid money is divided into three parts based on the primary and secondary school emergency fund. The district received $ 4.7 million from the CARES bill in the early days of the pandemic, which has already been issued. The remaining federal aid came in two installments, a package of $ 20.3 million in the final months of President Trump’s administration and $ 45.6 million under the US bailout plan passed earlier this year.

All three aid packages came with slightly different rules. The last two packages, which make up the bulk of the funding, were not issued. The use of the latter packages must pass a three-step test to either prevent, reduce or respond to COVID-19.

Currently, the district is trying to shift some of its funds to pay grants to employees taking on additional duties due to COVID-19, but the state has consistently declined districts to use the money to largely pay the salaries or bonuses. In the meantime, the $ 20.3 million must be spent by the end of September 2023 and the $ 45.6 million the following year.

Herndon said it was dangerous to try to fund permanent bonuses with volatile cash because the district could not sustain increases after the grants expired.

“Our goal is to find sustainable funding,” said Herndon, adding that the district is in the process of setting a price for the implementation of the wage study.

The district will spend more than $ 30 million in aid on repairing and upgrading HVAC systems in its schools. This will achieve a long-term capital goal by removing this funding from the capital requirement list of more than $ 200 million in the district’s facilities.

These expenses are acceptable as they improve the air quality in the buildings. When all work is complete, every school in the district will have HVAC systems with fresh air exchangers.

The $ 26.3 million grant is different. Its express purpose is to give teachers incentives to advance the work of the district on its special renewal status.

Earlier this year, the district announced its first grant incentive program, which will provide $ 585,000 in signing and retention bonuses at 13 schools. The district management has discussed creating an incentive payment with the subsidy at their schools in need, in order to also attract teachers.

Where does the district find money?

North Carolina is one of the few states that has left the funding of its public schools to the total grace of the state and local governments.

School systems in NC have no authority to collect taxes or generate income of their own accord, except through grants and private donations. The overwhelming majority of the district’s $ 207.6 million budget for this fiscal year comes from a combination of federal, state and local funds awarded directly by these institutions.

Most of the money comes from the state. One possibility is for the state to pass one of the proposed budgets currently circulating in the legislature. The budget could include either a $ 13 or $ 15 minimum wage for civil servants, with the state government assuming the state-funded portion of the increase. But a budget passed by the legislature that could come at the end of this month would also apply nationwide.

The second place to find funding is through the Rowan County Board of Commissioners. That year, the commissioners cut nearly $ 500,000 from current expenses for the district, while the local portion of salary and welfare expenses increased by $ 416,000. Local funding is $ 38.8 million.

“One of the things our county needs to sell to businesses and potential citizens is quality schools,” Herndon said, adding that it requires quality staff and competitive wages.

Herndon said RSS should meet with the commissioners in person to have a conversation so that district officials can understand the district’s needs. Letters sent to district officials each year may lack the emotion and passion behind the district’s work.

The district has introduced itself to commissioners in the past, but the COVID-19 pandemic has made this meeting difficult.

The county also provides almost all of the capital funding for the county. Small purchases of equipment such as furniture could be made, but local money is used to build schools.

The final way to find money is to exercise some financial discretion. Renewal gives the district more government funding flexibility than the average district, making it easier to keep track of the district’s spending.

Herndon cited as an example of buying curriculum materials and analyzing whether that product gives the district what it wants. If not, RSS could test competing products or free up that money for other initiatives.

“If we are serious about offering competitive wages to our employees, we need to look very carefully at what we are currently funding,” said Herndon.

Southwest weighs schedule adjustments, apologizes to workers after complaints

A Southwest Airlines Boeing 737-7H4 jet rolls for the gate after landing at Midway International Airport in Chicago, Illinois on April 6, 2021.

Kamil Krzaczynski | AFP | Getty Images

Southwest Airlines Apologized to workers Friday after their unions complained about stressful schedules this summer, saying they would consider changing dates for later this year.

The airline has added more flights to its schedule compared to some of its competitors to take advantage of increasing travel demand.

The increase in bookings was a welcome change compared to “a year ago, but we have to be honest with ourselves: It also put a strain on our operations and put a heavy burden on you all. And I’m really sorry,” wrote COO Mike Van de Ven in an employee notice viewed by CNBC.

Staff shortages have exacerbated problems such as bad weather for some airlines this summer and contributed to flight cancellations and delays. Southwest had a 64% punctuality rate between June 1 and August 18, less than American, delta and United, according to information from Cirium.

Van de Ven said the airline is continuing to evaluate our fourth quarter flight schedules and we are seriously reviewing flight altitudes to ensure our flying matches the personnel required to operate in this more complicated COVID environment.

Southwest declined to comment, but TWU Local 556, which represents the airline’s flight attendants, told members late Friday that the airline had reversed its course of adding an additional 720 crew assignments to its September plans.

The Southwest Pilots Union said Thursday it was Consideration of picket lines at US airports over Thanksgiving and Christmas to protest over crowded schedules, a lack of hotels and dining options, and other issues. Flight attendants raised similar issues this week.

“We will not follow our traditional staffing models as we will reassess our current situation in October, November and December,” wrote Van de Ven. “You come first.

The airline said earlier this week that it was struggling to hire new staff and was offering bonuses worth about. at $ 300 for employee referrals.

Southwest “continues to invest in a very aggressive hiring plan, even on a reduced schedule,” said Van de Ven.

Earlier this month the company did cut its sales forecast, which blames the rapidly expanding Covid-19 Delta variant for a decline in bookings and an increase in cancellations.

In this week, Spirit Airlines said it will cut some of its flight schedules for the remainder of the third quarter after more than 2,800 cancellations cost the company approximately $ 50 million.

Alaska Airways is contemplating Covid vaccine mandates for employees

Alaska Airlines Boeing 737 taking off from LAX.

PG | Getty Images

Alaska Airlines told employees on Wednesday that it is considering making Covid-19 vaccines mandatory for employees, according to a company memo that CNBC viewed.

The policy change would make the Seattle-based airline the newest airline to require vaccines for its employees. On Friday, United Airlines became the first major US airline to operate Prescribe vaccines for its employees. Border airlines and Hawaiian Airlines have since issued similar requirements.

Alaska, which has about 20,000 employees, said if it did make vaccines mandatory it would after the Food and Drug Administration fully approved one of the vaccines currently available under emergency approval.

Airline executives recently raised concerns about the rapidly spreading Delta variant of Covid. Southwest Airlines on Wednesday lowered its revenue and profit outlook, blaming the variant’s spread on weaker bookings and increased cancellations.

delta, Southwest and American have encouraged, but not mandated, vaccination of employees.

“As an employer with a duty to protect you, and given the contagion and health risks of the COVID-19 virus and its variants, we have the right to make that decision and ask you for information about your vaccine status,” Alaska employees said . It was said that there would be exemptions for religious or medical reasons, similar to other companies.

Enterprise is booming for the creators of Karen’s Diner a 1950s fashion US diner the place the meals is nice and the employees are impolite.

The events of the last 15 months and the international border closings have posed great challenges for the Australian hospitality industry. Viral Ventures co-founders and directors Aden Levin and James Farrell transform an empty retail space and open Karen’s Diner, a 1950s-style US diner where the food is great and the staff rude.

Sydney-based hospitality company Viral Ventures, owner of Sydney’s famous World Bar (now known as Wonderland Bar), has opened seven new venues in the past 12 months and employs over 78 local hospitality and entertainment professionals. At a time when staff shortages are widespread in the industry, the company has increased its focus on creating local jobs.

With that in mind, Viral Ventures is transforming an empty retail space and opening July 7th in World Square Karen’s Diner, a 1950s-style US diner where the food is great and the staff are rude to the CBD in this six month pop up.

With the rise of the infamous complaining “Karens” in today’s society and to poke fun at today’s “demolition culture”, this innovative concept becomes an interesting place to visit, where customers can find American home-style cooking such as burgers, wings, shakes and Cocktails that encourage rude, tongue-in-cheek fun to staff and customers alike. The menu will also include a range of vegan and vegetarian options.

Regarding the launch, Aden Levin, co-founder of Viral Ventures said, “All of our concepts at Viral Ventures are designed to ensure that people are having fun and possibly trying something they have never experienced before, be it an immersive one Experience in our Wonderland Bar or being served by angry Karen’s in our new Karen’s Diner. We just want people to have fun and that’s our approach to all of our Australia venues and pop-ups. “

Viral Ventures adjusted its business model in the wake of Covid-19 and was determined to continue its strong growth strategy. Incredibly, the company has grown 150% in sales over the past 12 months and grossed over $ 5,000,000. Given this recent success, the team is keen to continue growing at this pace and continue to create local jobs.

This milestone grows for co-founders and directors Aden Levin and James Farrell, who believe there is no limit to the creativity of their concepts. Aden and James have combined three and a half decades of experience in the events industry. Aden has successfully invested in the hit show Dragons Den UK for its innovative and unique Mainstage Travel concept and has a wealth of experience in the events industry, while James takes a leading role in the event and creative sector and successfully brings record-breaking events to the market.

Viral Ventures operates globally in Australia, the US, the UK and Canada and plans to enter the Asian market. Currently, Viral Ventures has a number of themed venues on three continents including The Wonderland Bar and The Big Bake and Beyond Cinema, as well as several pop-ups also gracing cities like the Smuggler’s Ship and Bumper Cars on Ice.

You can find the creative concepts of Viral Ventures here: https://www.viralventuresglobal.com/

NJ leisure venues begin receiving federal COVID-19 grants to reopen, rehire workers

News 12 employees

June 24, 2021, 12:58 am

Updated on: 24.06.2021, 00:58

Now that some of New Jersey’s entertainment establishments and businesses are receiving long-awaited federal grants, following orders to shut down during the pandemic. The scholarships are designed to get people back to work and bring art and culture back to the communities.

Jersey City’s White Eagle Hall is one of the concert venues closed by the pandemic. The owners say they are ready to go back to work.

Married co-owners Ben LoPiccolo and Olga Levina say the reopening is possible in large part with a federal grant of nearly $ 740,000 that the venue has received. It is one of 36 New Jersey venues that have received a Shuttered Venues Operator Grant to cover a percentage of losses and recruit staff.

The scholarship program was set up last December, but the application process was slowed down by technical glitches. The honors are only now beginning.

About $ 11 million has been spent in New Jersey to date, and $ 16 billion is available nationwide through the federal grant program.

Some Cleveland County Colleges workers to get some more money

Cleveland County Schools staff and bus drivers will have a little more cash in their pockets by the end of this year.

On Monday, the county education authority unanimously approved an increase in the teachers’ allowance and granted all bus drivers a general increase of $ 1 an hour.

Teacher allowances are additional amounts of money given to teachers in addition to their annual salary. The supplement sizes vary from county to county and district to district, with larger areas often offering more money than smaller ones.

“They’re a very important part in teacher recruitment,” said Head Boy Greg Shull. “As soon as we get people in the door, they really like to be here and love Cleveland County as a place to live, work and play. The supplements help us get them in.”

Before the vote on Monday, the additions for teachers were between 3.5% and 4.75%, depending on years of service. All teachers now receive a flat rate surcharge of 5.75% regardless of the length of service. How much money that actually means for each teacher depends on the length of service and the salary level. Base salary for teachers in North Carolina starts at $ 35,000 per year and ranges from $ 52,520 per year.

Teacher supplements are issued at different times throughout the year. The next payouts are set for June and use the newly approved rate of 5.75%.

Deputy headmasters and unclassified school staff will also experience an additional increase due to the vote of the Board of Directors.

The main surcharges for primary school assistants are 2% above the surcharge for teachers. The main surcharges for middle school assistants are 2.5% above the teacher surcharge and the main surcharges for high school assistants are 3% above the teacher surcharges.

All non-certified employees will also receive an annual bonus of 3% this year.

Dustin George can be reached at 704-669-3337 or Dustin.George@ShelbyStar.com. Find him on Twitter @DustinLGeorge.

United Airways tells workers it is hiring lots of of pilots for journey restoration

A United Airlines Boeing 737 Max 9 aircraft lands at San Francisco International Airport.

Justin Sullivan | Getty Images

United Airlines On Thursday, staff told staff they would soon be hiring hundreds of pilots – a process the airline had to stop when the coronavirus pandemic destroyed demand for travel last year. This comes from an internal email that has been checked by CNBC.

The Chicago-based airline is the first of the major US carriers to announce that it will resume hiring pilots. This is the latest sign that she is preparing for a recovery. The airline will begin hiring approximately 300 pilots who had contingent vacancies or training scheduled last year before the airline abandoned the hiring.

Over the past year, airlines, including United, have urged thousands of workers to take advantage of buyouts, early retirement packages, and leave of absence in an effort to cut costs during the pandemic. United and its pilots union – the Air Line Pilots Association – reached an agreement last year to avoid vacationing with their pilots, including reduced hours for some junior pilotsHowever, these lower guarantees are suspended due to state aid.

Congress included a third round of federal payroll for airlines that bans downsizing through September 30 as part of coronavirus aid worth $ 1.9 trillion Package last month. As of March 2020, lawmakers have provided $ 54 billion in grants and loans to airlines to pay workers during the crisis.

US airlines combined lost $ 35 billion last year, but expect bookings to grow steadily as more people are vaccinated and more comfortable boarding planes.

“With vaccination rates increasing and the demand for travel increasing, I am pleased to announce that United will resume the pilot recruitment process that was halted last year,” wrote Bryan Quigley, United’s senior vice president of flight operations on Thursday in a staff note watched by CNBC. “We’re starting with the 300 or so pilots who either had a new recruitment class appointment that was canceled, or who had a conditional vacancy in 2020.”

The demand for air travel has increased recently. The Transportation Security Administration examined an average of 1.2 million people a day last month, up 15% from last year when the pandemic and stay-at-home orders halted almost all travel.

Last month’s volume is still below half of March 2019 levels, with business and international travel still largely stalling, but demand for recreational activities is starting to rise. Scott Kirby, United CEO, told an industry conference on Wednesday that domestic leisure demand has recovered almost entirely.

“I’m particularly pleased that we were able to project our staff during this disaster,” said Todd Insler, chairman of the United Chapter of the Air Line Pilots Association and captain at United, of the pandemic. He said if the company had been on vacation it would have been much harder to capitalize on the recovery of the trip.

Like United, other airlines see a need for additional staff, especially pilots, whose training is costly and time-consuming.

Spirit Airlines Last month, hiring of pilots and flight attendants resumed while other low-cost airlines Allegiant Air and Sun Country Airlines Also expect to rent this year.