Gal Gadot spotlights girls’s tales in new docuseries | Leisure




FILE – Gal Gadot arrives to the Vanity Fair Oscar Party in Beverly Hills, California on Sunday, February 9, 2020. Gadot uses her Hollywood star power to spotlight remarkable women from around the world. Actor “Wonder Woman” is the host and executive producer of a new documentary series, “National Geographic Presents IMPACT with Gal Gadot,” which premieres on Monday April 26th.




Gal Gadot used her Hollywood star power to produce “Impact,” a new documentary series that follows six women from around the world who have made a positive impact on their communities.

From JOHN CARUCCI Associated Press

NEW YORK (AP) – Gal Gadot uses her Hollywood star power to spotlight remarkable women from around the world.

Actress Wonder Woman is the host and executive producer of a new documentary series that follows six women who have made positive impacts on their communities despite dealing with poverty, violence, discrimination and natural disasters.

The 35-year-old says National Geographic Presents IMPACT with Gal Gadot was born from her search for “something good with my fame and social media” following the 2017 success of Wonder Woman.

She and her husband, Yaron Varsano, who is also executive producer on the series, watched a short documentary by music video director Ryan Pallotta about a dancer from the favelas in Brazil.

“We fell completely in love with the story and decided to come up with a concept for the story,” said Gadot.

The first episode follows a young black figure skating coach in Detroit who has dedicated her life to coaching young black girls to empower them.

“It not only empowers them, but also gives them a skill … familiar or familiar with white people who do it, which is ice skating,” Gadot said.

Another episode tells the story of Kayla, who helps build a safe community for homeless color transgender women in Memphis, Tennessee, by building houses.

Star Wars Children Video Spotlights Padmé’s Persona, Type

Unfortunately there isn't one in her name Unfortunately there is no “U” in her name, which she could stand for “unmoved”. Screenshot: Youtube

Queen, Senator, Woman of the Future Darth Vader, Mother of Luke and Leia Skywalker, tragic figure in Star Wars history – pretty much everything we know Padmé Amidala is epic and oversized when it comes to her role in shaping the galaxy far, far away.

This new short video from Star Wars Kids on YouTubeHowever, with the letters of her first name illustrated with animated Clone Wars clips, comic panels, and live-action footage featuring Natalie Portman’s big-screen performance, we get a slightly better look at Padmé’s life and personality. “P” stands for “passionate”, “A” for “adaptable” and so on.

The tone here is as cheerful as one would expect from something aimed at children, so the darkness isn’t really mentioned in Padmé’s life – but luckily it is battered wardrobe does.

Illustration for article titled Padmé's Personality (and Sense of Style) Get the limelight in this short Star Wars video

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Evaluation: New guide spotlights rogue lab and a shadow business | Leisure



This cover photo, published by Avery / Penguin Random House, features “Kill Shot: A Shadow Industry, a Deadly Disease” by Jason Dearen.


HONS

From ANN LEVIN Associated Press

“Kill Shot: A Shadow Industry, A Deadly Disease” by Jason Dearen (Avery)

Lower back pain. Stenosis of the spine. Cataracts. All of these conditions are treated with drugs made by compound pharmacies. And these drugs can blind you or kill you, in large part because there is almost no government oversight.

In his great but disturbing new book, Kill Shot, Associated Press investigative reporter Jason Dearen examines the shadow industry of compounding pharmacies and various unsuccessful efforts to contain it. The story centers around the New England Compounding Center, which produced mold-infected batches of an injectable steroid in 2012 that killed more than 100 people and made nearly 800 others sick in 20 states.

Eventually the laboratory in Framingham, Massachusetts, half an hour west of Boston, closed and 13 people, including co-owner Barry Cadden and supervising pharmacist Glenn Chin, were convicted of federal crimes. But, as Dearen makes clear in his gripping, tightly-written narrative, the problems of putting together pharmacies that make up at least 10% of the country’s drug supply are far from over.

Drawing on transcripts, interviews, FDA inspection reports, and other sources, he reconstructs this slow-moving tragedy into scenes of almost cinematic intensity. We meet the sympathetic victims, including many elderly people with chronic pain who, after receiving the injections, slowly and terribly died of fungal meningitis and its complications. We also meet the die-hard lab owners who wanted to get rich by cutting corners, hiring unqualified staff, running a dirty business, and relying on payouts to boost business.

Assessment: New guide spotlights rogue lab and a shadow trade | Leisure



This cover photo, published by Avery / Penguin Random House, features “Kill Shot: A Shadow Industry, a Deadly Disease” by Jason Dearen.


HONS

From ANN LEVIN Associated Press

“Kill Shot: A Shadow Industry, A Deadly Disease” by Jason Dearen (Avery)

Lower back pain. Stenosis of the spine. Cataracts. All of these conditions are treated with drugs made by compound pharmacies. And these drugs can blind you or kill you, in large part because there is almost no government oversight.

In his great but disturbing new book, Kill Shot, Associated Press investigative reporter Jason Dearen examines the shadow industry of compounding pharmacies and various unsuccessful efforts to contain it. The story centers around the New England Compounding Center, which produced mold-infected batches of an injectable steroid in 2012 that killed more than 100 people and made nearly 800 others sick in 20 states.

Eventually the laboratory in Framingham, Massachusetts, half an hour west of Boston, closed and 13 people, including co-owner Barry Cadden and supervising pharmacist Glenn Chin, were convicted of federal crimes. But, as Dearen makes clear in his gripping, tightly-written narrative, the problems of putting together pharmacies that make up at least 10% of the country’s drug supply are far from over.

Drawing on transcripts, interviews, FDA inspection reports, and other sources, he reconstructs this slow-moving tragedy into scenes of almost cinematic intensity. We meet the sympathetic victims, including many elderly people with chronic pain who, after receiving the injections, slowly and terribly died of fungal meningitis and its complications. We also meet the die-hard lab owners who wanted to get rich by cutting corners, hiring unqualified staff, running a dirty business, and relying on payouts to boost business.

Overview: New guide spotlights rogue lab and a shadow trade | Leisure



This cover photo, published by Avery / Penguin Random House, features “Kill Shot: A Shadow Industry, a Deadly Disease” by Jason Dearen.


HONS

From ANN LEVIN Associated Press

“Kill Shot: A Shadow Industry, A Deadly Disease” by Jason Dearen (Avery)

Lower back pain. Stenosis of the spine. Cataracts. All of these conditions are treated with drugs made by compound pharmacies. And these drugs can blind you or kill you, in large part because there is almost no government oversight.

In his great but disturbing new book, Kill Shot, Associated Press investigative reporter Jason Dearen examines the shadow industry of compounding pharmacies and various unsuccessful efforts to contain it. The story centers around the New England Compounding Center, which produced mold-infected batches of an injectable steroid in 2012 that killed more than 100 people and made nearly 800 others sick in 20 states.

Eventually the laboratory in Framingham, Massachusetts, half an hour west of Boston, closed and 13 people, including co-owner Barry Cadden and supervising pharmacist Glenn Chin, were convicted of federal crimes. But, as Dearen makes clear in his gripping, tightly-written narrative, the problems of putting together pharmacies that make up at least 10% of the country’s drug supply are far from over.

Drawing on transcripts, interviews, FDA inspection reports, and other sources, he reconstructs this slow-moving tragedy into scenes of almost cinematic intensity. We meet the sympathetic victims, including many elderly people with chronic pain who, after receiving the injections, slowly and terribly died of fungal meningitis and its complications. We also meet the die-hard lab owners who wanted to get rich by cutting corners, hiring unqualified staff, running a dirty business, and relying on payouts to boost business.