Ring within the new 12 months in model on the Area Coast

December 31

‘NYE Countdown To The Comics’ Dinner: Enjoy a three-course dinner buffet with entertainment from three professional Las Vegas comics at the Italian American Club, 1471 Cypress Ave., Melbourne on Friday, December 31st. free champagne toast and an outdoor campfire. Tables in front are reserved for groups of 6-8 people. Tickets are $ 55 upfront or $ 65 at the box office. Call 321-890-7754.

New Year’s Eve Gala: The Melbourne Municipal Band’s Rock & Roll Revue will play 200 Rialto Place dance hits from the 1950s and 1960s at this celebration at the Melbourne Hilton. The 3-hour open bar begins with the opening of the piano bar, followed by dinner with a floor show by the Swingtimer Trio. The dance starts after dinner and continues until 12:30 pm with a balloon drop and champagne toast at midnight. Guests must be vaccinated or have recovered from COVID-19. Tickets are $ 125. visit mmband.org.

New Years Eve Party: A New Year’s Eve party will be held on the Landing Rooftop of Hotel Melby, 801 E. Strawbridge Ave., Melbourne, December 31st from 9:00 p.m. to 2:00 a.m. Tickets include appetizers, food stations, an open bar until 1:00 a.m., live music, a photo box with props, New Year’s party favors and noisemakers, and a champagne toast at midnight. Admission is $ 195 for one ticket and $ 165 each for two or more tickets. A Hotel Melby Stay Package is also available, which includes party entry, hotel accommodation and brunch, as well as bottomless mimosas on New Year’s Day from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. Call 321-327-6007 or visit hotelmelby.com.

New Years Eve Party 2021: The festivities will take place on December 31st from 8:00 p.m. to 1:00 a.m. at the Holiday Inn, 8298 N. Wickham Road, Melbourne Bar and a champagne toast at midnight. Tickets that include a room, dinner, and the party are $ 249 per couple or $ 175 per person. Tickets that don’t include a room for the night are $ 149 per couple or $ 75 per person. To reserve, call 321-255-0077 ext. 165 or 172 and use the group code NYE.

January 1st

Spectacular Christmas lights.

Festival of Lights walk: The Space Coast Lightfest at Wickham Park, 2785 Leisure Way, Melbourne, is open for strolling on January 1st; no cars are allowed. Pets are also welcome if they are kept on a leash. There will be a Christmas village, a photo box, visits to Santa Claus, food trucks and more. The gates open at 4:30 p.m., vendors and Santa Claus are ready at 5:00 p.m., and the lights will come on at 6:30 p.m. The cost is $ 5 per person. visit spacecoastlightfest.com.

Christina LaFortune is the entertainment and TgIF editor at FLORIDA TODAY. Follow her on Facebook facebook.com/christinalafortune, on Twitter at @lafortunec, or send her an email at clafortune@floridatoday.com.

Whether you are into music, theater, festivals or other local entertainment, FLORIDA TODAY has it all. Support local journalism by joining. subscribe to Special Offers – USAToday Network.

House firm Loft Orbital raises $140 million from BlackRock

The company’s YAM-2 spacecraft during integration for launch.

Loft orbital

Loft Orbital, a space infrastructure startup, raised $ 140 million in a new round of funding led by investment giant BlackRock.

The San Francisco-based company launched its first space missions earlier this year, with Loft planning to use the new capital to scale its business and double its team.

“The best way to think of us is to offer space infrastructure as a service,” Alex Greenberg, co-founder and COO of Loft Orbital, told CNBC.

“If you’re a customer with a single payload or a constellation that you want to launch into space, but don’t want to be the one to build or design your own satellite – with the manufacturer, with the launcher, and actually with it to operate once it’s in space – then work with someone like us, “added Greenberg.

The company has raised $ 130 million including contributions from investors such as CEAS Investment, Foundation Capital, Uncork Capital, Ubiquity VC, and more. Loft also raised an additional $ 10 million from the same investors through convertible bonds, short-term debt that was converted during the round, bringing total equity to $ 140 million.

Loft declined to disclose its rating after the raise.

A team of engineers from the company stands around the YAM-3 spacecraft.

Loft orbital

In addition to San Francisco, Loft also has manufacturing facilities and facilities in Denver, Colorado and Toulouse, France. The company currently employs 70 people, with Loft co-founder and CEO Pierre-Damien Vaujour expecting CNBC to grow the number to around 160 by the end of 2022.

So far, Loft has launched two spaceships – which the company calls YAMs or “Yet Another Mission” – which are currently in orbit, each carrying multiple payloads for customers. Loft has more than 20 customers to date, including NASA, DARPA, the US Space Force, and Honeywell.

Greenberg emphasized that after an order is placed in the aerospace industry, it traditionally “takes between 18 and 36 months for a satellite to be delivered”. But to speed things up, Loft ordered his spacecraft “without knowing what was going to fly on it,” he said.

“It’s almost like an inventory model or a fulfillment center model – where we have the satellites in-house, a customer shows up, we stick them up and send them off to launch,” said Greenberg, adding that the business model means : Loft’s customers “can go into space in a few months instead of a few years if they did it themselves”.

Look inside Firefly House as rocket builder prepares for second launch

Space company Firefly prepares for its Alpha rocket’s second orbital launch attempt as the company plans to build the foundation of its business.

“Firefly aims to become the next SpaceX, a very transformative space transportation company,” said Tom Markusic, CEO of Firefly, to CNBC.

The company recently gave CNBC a look at its manufacturing and testing facilities near Austin, Texas as well as during its first alpha rocket launch in September.

“The rocket gives you the key to space. It’s critical, but the big sales do things in space, ”said Markusic.

Markusic – whose experience, among other things, in management positions Virgo galactic, Blue Origin, and SpaceX – compared the Firefly-built lunar lander called Blue Ghost to SpaceX’s series of Dragon capsules that put cargo and people into low-earth orbit. While Firefly’s Alpha missile costs $ 15 million per launch, Markusic says the lunar lander is far more lucrative per mission.

“Blue Ghost has approximately $ 150 million in revenue for the company on a full payload,” said Markusic.

Firefly Aerospace CEO Tom Markusic stands in front of the company’s Alpha rocket on SLC-2 at Vandenberg Space Force Base.

Andrew Evers | CNBC

While the initial Alpha launch hit several milestones for the company in September, an electrical problem shut down one of the rocket’s four engines and resulted in an intentionally explosive end about two minutes after the flight.

Firefly Aerospace’s Alpha missile explodes in a ball of fire in the skies over California after being launched from Vandenberg Space Force Base on September 2, 2021.

Andrew Evers | CNBC

Undeterred, Firefly expects to make a second attempt in early 2022, with reaching orbit and beginning regular flights, which are critical to the company’s goals, stated Firefly COO Lauren Lyons.

“We want to launch 24 missiles in 2024,” said Lyons. “One of the things that will help us get that cadence is to fly our next flight as fast as possible and the next as fast as possible and overcome that learning curve as quickly as possible so we can get into repeatable builds . “

Firefly currently spends about $ 10 million a month, Markusic said, and he wants revenue to solidify “before we go public”. The company has raised more than $ 200 million in venture capital to date.

“I don’t want to use the IPO as just another avenue to finance development,” Markusic told CNBC. “I think there is a chance around this time next year we could talk about a public offer from Firefly.”

Jeff Bezos’ Blue Origin unveils Orbital Reef personal area station

WASHINGTON – Jeff Bezos’ Blue Origin announced on Monday its plan for a private space station called “Orbital Reef”, which is to be built in collaboration with several space companies and is expected to be deployed between 2025 and 2030.

Blue Origin describes the Orbital Reef station, which would be habitable for up to 10 people, as a “mixed-use business park” in space – as well as “exotic hospitality” for space tourists.

Orbital Reef is designed to have almost as much habitable volume as the International Space Station.

The company’s primary partner for the station is Sierra Space, a subsidiary of aerospace company Sierra Nevada Corporation Boeing, Redwire room and Genesis Engineering.

“We are only just beginning to understand the enormous impact microgravity research, development and manufacturing can have, not just on universe exploration and discovery, but also on improving life on earth,” said Mike Gold, executive vice President of Redwire, opposite CNBC.

Redwire Space’s shares were temporarily held on the New York Stock Exchange after rising following the announcement. The stock rose as much as 40% in trading but gave up most of the gains and ended the day 8% higher at $ 13.14.

A rendering of the space station “Ocean Reef” in orbit.

Blue origin

Blue Origin will provide the “utility systems” and “core modules” of the space station and plans to launch Orbital Reef with its New Glenn rocket.

Sierra Space is contributing its LIFE (Large Integrated Flexible Environment; essentially an inflatable space station module) and plans to use its Dream Chaser spacecraft to transport cargo and crew to and from the station.

Redwire room, which went public in September, will carry out the station’s payload operations and build operational structures. Redwire also plans to use Orbital Reef for microgravity research, development and manufacturing.

Boeing will build Orbital Reef’s science-based module and operate the station and perform maintenance engineering. The aerospace giant also plans to use it his Starliner capsule for the transport of crew and cargo to the station.

Genesis Engineering will bring in its “Single Person Spacecraft” system, which the company is calling as an alternative to a spacesuit.

In a conference call with reporters, executives from the team’s companies declined to reveal how much each of them would like to invest in Orbital Reef.

Blue Origin Vice President Brent Sherwood said the team will not give a “specific number” on how much the Orbital Reef space station will cost, adding that the financial numbers are commercially sensitive.

Bezos’ company has been considering building a space station for more than a year since CNBC previously reported, and added a number of job postings for his Orbital Destinations team earlier this month.

Bezos’ vision: living and working in space

Founder, Chairman, CEO and President of Amazon Jeff Bezos speaks during an event about Blue Origin’s space exploration plans in Washington, the United States, on May 9, 2019.

Clodagh Kilcoyne | Reuters

The space station race is heating up

Blue Origin intends to compete for one of NASA’s anticipated contracts for the Commercial LEO Destinations program, but Bezos’ company is not alone. NASA’s director of commercial space, Phil McAlister, told CNBC last month that the program had received “about a dozen proposals” from a variety of companies for contracts.

With NASA planning to decommission the International Space Station by the end of the decade, the CLD program represents an attempt to turn to private companies for new space stations – with the space agency expecting to save more than $ 1 billion annually.

“We are in a second golden age in space exploration and development,” said Redwire’s Gold.

Last week, another private space station was announced by a separate team of companies: Nanoracks, Voyager Space, and Lockheed Martin are building a station called Starlab, which is scheduled to go into operation by 2027.

Starlab is to be manned by up to four astronauts, which corresponds to about a third of the volume of the ISS.

Concept drawing of a space station “Starlab”

Nanoracks

NASA has already started funding a company’s ambitions under a separate contract from the CLD program after Axiom Space with $ 140 million. Axiom plans to build modules that will be connected to the ISS. When the ISS retired, Axiom would then dismantle its modules and turn it into a free-flying space station.

An illustration of three of the company’s modules connected to the International Space Station.

Axiom space

Jeff Bezos’ Blue Origin launches William Shatner to house and again

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Jeff Bezos’ Blue Origin launched its New Shepard rocket for the fifth time this year on Wednesday, and Canadian actor William Shatner joined the company’s second manned spaceflight to date.

This New Shepard mission, called NS-18, led a crew of four: Shatner, Blue Origin VP of Mission and Flight Operations Audrey Powers, Planet Labs co-founder Chris Boshuizen, and Medidata co-founder Glen de Vries.

It took off at about 10:50 a.m. ET.

The crew of NS-18, from left: Audrey Powers, William Shatner, Dr. Chris Boshuizen and Glen de Vries.

Blue origin

Shatner, who played Captain Kirk in the original television series “Star Trek”, is 90 years old and the oldest person to fly into space, starting with a crew in July.

The rocket launched from Blue Origin’s private facility in West Texas and reached over 100,000 kilometers (or more than 340,000 feet in altitude) before safely returning to Earth a few minutes later. The start took about 11 minutes from start to finish. The crew experienced weightlessness for about three minutes.

Star Trek actor William Shatner, along with former NASA engineer Chris Boshuizen, clinical research entrepreneur Glen de Vries, and Blue Origin Vice President and Engineer Audrey Powers receives NS-18 from Blue prior to their suborbital flight on New Shepard’s NS-18 mission Origin near Van Horn, Texas, USA in a still from a video broadcast on October 13, 2021.

Blue origin | Reuters

The New Shepard capsule accelerated to more than three times the speed of sound to exceed the 80-kilometer (about 50 miles) limit that the U.S. uses to mark the edge of space. The capsule will be flown autonomously without a human pilot and returned under a set of parachutes for landing in the Texas desert.

The New Shepard rocket booster is also reusable and landed on a concrete platform near the launch site. NS-18 was the fourth take-off and landing for this booster.

The company also flies New Shepard for cargo missions, as in Augustcarrying research payloads in the capsule.

The NS-18 crew returns in the New Shepard capsule.

Blue origin

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Get together Area raises $1M for metaverse-style digital occasions

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Party.Room raised $ 1 million to expand its Metaverse theme virtual events Companies.

The company will use the money to grow its sales, explore new applications, launch its first metaverse setting for virtual events, and create a collection of non-fungible tokens for this purpose.

the Metaverse is the fabled universe of virtual worlds that are all interconnected, like in novels like Snow crash and Ready player one. And almost everyone in the world wants to be the first to alert consumers to their version of the metaverse.

Yurii Filipchuk, founder of Party.Space, said in an interview with GamesBeat that he started the project when his friend said during the pandemic that the party chat needed an upgrade because it was so boring to be with people via Communicate text. The company started in May 2020.

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Above: Real faces can be seen on the Party.Space avatars.

Image source: Party.Space

Corporate events are increasingly moving online, not only to connect people during the pandemic, but also to save money on the cost of events in physical locations. The key is to get people involved in a way that will keep them with them.

“It’s important to talk to colleagues outside of the office, or at least at the water cooler,” he said.

Filipchuk said his company can share analytical details with corporate customers, such as: B. How long people stay, how they behave, what types of groups they form, and what type of content they prefer.

“We can provide all the data that is very important for businesses and content providers to improve,” said Filipchuk. “We can create 3D spaces and have a gallery with 11 different venues for company and community events.”

People can play board games like Pictionary together. Such games can serve as icebreakers for strangers. Filipchuk refers to the platform as more of a microverse or a small experiment that demonstrated the power of online communities.

“It’s a virtual event platform that sits between games and virtual events,” said Filipchuk.

The financing

Above: Party.Space can create custom venues for 3D events.

Image source: Party.Space

Funding comes from TA Ventures, Capital of the first day, and Hjalmar Windbladh.

“Our venture fund was impressed by the project team: the level of technology specialists and the speed of the ‘party. Space’s products are significantly higher than other virtual space projects, ”said Igor Pertsiya, partner at TA Ventures. “Once you’ve hosted an event on their platform, you will better understand the idea of ​​the metaverse – an alternative digital reality where people work, play and socialize.”

Party.Space aims to create a sense of presence where companies can come together, communicate and collaborate with large teams.

The company’s customers include Scaleway, Wargaming, grammar, Epidemic tone, Plug`n`Play, Scania, and DevGamm. At the Epicdemic Sound event, people stayed an average of three hours and seven minutes.

Above: You can use emojis in Party.Space.

Image source: Party.Space

“It’s pretty impressive to this community that people stay in front of their computers for more than three hours,” said Filipchuk.

They started by creating assets for various activities and developing ways for people to show off their photos. They uploaded some memes and emojis for people to use to communicate with each other.

“Then we started doing after parties for virtual events,” Filipchuk said.

The company has developed features that could target remote teams who struggled to do more than just video chat during the pandemic. Some clients asked Party.Space to be more ambitious and create virtual venues for 5,000 people.

“We came up with the idea that we can just move around in bubbles that you identify,” Filipchuk said. “We designed it so that each website is a separate room for conversations.”

They created spaces with tables where people could sit together and socialize. Late last year, an organizer hosted a 130-minute event that saw 75% of all visitors actively participating in various fashion activities. The most popular room so far has been a music bingo room with more than 500 people. About 70 people lined up to be in the spotlight during the music event.

“It was pretty complicated. A very important part was that we provided analytics to the client, ”Filipchuk said.

The focus is initially on large company events with access via laptops or desktops.

The company is based in Kiev, Ukraine, and employs 23 people.

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Consolidation in China’s electrical automobile house is ‘inevitable’

The electric vehicle sector is experiencing its “most exciting moment” – and a consolidation in the industry is inevitable, says Helen Liu of Bain & Company.

“I would say that consolidation is an inevitable trend in this industry,” Liu, a partner in the consulting firm, told CNBC’s Capital Connection on Tuesday. She cited reasons such as the capital-intensive and technology-heavy nature of the electric vehicle sector.

“Historically, we’ve seen invisible hands like the market, and also visible trends, regulations that continually navigated the industry through the consolidation trend,” she said.

On Monday, China’s Minister of Industry and Information Technology the country has “too many” EV manufacturers. These comments sparked fears about further regulatory action by Beijing, this time targeting the autonomous vehicle sector after earlier moves in other industries such as private education and technology.

IHS Markit’s Huaibin Lin said he saw little chance of regulatory interference from Beijing in the short term. Demands by the industry and information technology ministry for a consolidation of the auto sector are not new and have taken place in the last 20 years, he told CNBC’s “Squawk Box Asia” on Tuesday.

“We are in [an] an ever-growing market where we have seen tremendous growth in automotive sales over the past 20 years, “said Lin, manager China Automotive at IHS Markit, adding that the new energy vehicle market is currently experiencing very strong momentum.

“Are we going to see any drastic consolidation in the industry itself? We think there will be a big question mark as long as the market goes on,” he said.

For the next 10 years you will see very fierce competition within the new energy vehicle industry. Nobody knows who will actually survive in the end.

Helen Liu

Partner, Bain & Company

Liu of the consulting firm Bain agreed, saying that the momentum for growth and the outlook for the sector are currently very positive. This is underpinned by factors such as supporting guidelines and, above all, customer acceptance.

“Based on our Bain study this year, we found that the acceptance of electric cars by Chinese customers is leading global trends and we also believe it is steadily increasing,” she said.

China’s electric boom

For its part, China previously mentioned that it would be happy By 2025, 20% of all new cars sold are to be New Energy Vehicles.

Still, the two analysts say it’s too early to say who could be a clear winner in China’s EV space.

“I think it might be a little too early to say which brand or name will win in the end,” said Liu of Bain.

Read more about electric vehicles from CNBC Pro

Beyond domestic competition, IHS Markit’s Lin said China’s electric car makers are also expected to face increased capital competition over the next decade.

Some of this competition could come from long-standing established companies in the automotive sector, he said, with traditional internal combustion engine vehicle manufacturers such as: Volkswagen, BMW and Daimler’s Mercedes is now forging “drastic” electrification strategies.

“You will see very fierce competition in the new energy vehicle industry for the next 10 years,” Lin predicted. “Nobody knows who will actually survive in the end.”

How Blue Origin, SpaceX, Virgin Galactic house race might influence the ambiance

Billionaire businessman Jeff Bezos will launch with three crew members aboard a New Shepard rocket on the world’s first unattended suborbital flight from Blue Origin Launch Site 1 near Van Horn, Texas on July 20, 2021.

Joe Skipper | Reuters

The space industry is taking off after decades of stagnation.

Driven primarily by the rapidly evolving space programs of Elon Musk’s SpaceX and China, the world experienced 114 orbital launches in 2018 – the first three-digit number since 1990. This year, the orbital launches are slated to be for the first time since the 1970s. And that count doesn’t include Jeff Bezos’ most recent suborbital tourism trips Blue origin and Richard Bransons Virgo galactic.

Between planning NASA Moon return, SpaceX is constructing a massive “mega-constellation” of Internet satellite, China Crew of a space station and suborbital companies sending crews of tourists to the edge of space, launches could soon be the order of the day.

But will the new space boom have its price on the planet?

“While we obviously need space launches and satellites, when you think about things like space tourism, you think about the environmental impact,” says Ian Whittaker, lecturer in space physics at Nottingham Trent University in the UK

Researchers are trying to figure out how the Earth might respond to stronger clouds of smoke from rocket exhaust by examining the total mix of carbon dioxide, soot, alumina, and other particles that are collectively emitted by a spreading variety of rockets.

So far, the fledgling space industry is not seriously threatening the environment and likely has room for growth. However, it is unclear whether that will change as the new space race accelerates.

“I don’t think we know enough at this point to pinpoint exactly what this future should look like,” said Martin Ross, atmospheric researcher at The Aerospace Corp. “We just don’t have this information yet.”

Effects on carbon dioxide and climate change

As the world grapples with the move away from fossil fuels, the rise of a new industry – especially one with huge clouds bubbling out from powerful engines – could seem unsettling.

Most rockets emit more planet-warming carbon than many airplanes. A few minutes of weightlessness on the Virgin Galactic spacecraft will leave a carbon footprint comparable to flying business class across the Atlantic, and an orbital launch of SpaceX’s upcoming fully reusable spacecraft will emit as much carbon dioxide as one continuously flying an aircraft for about three years, according to a back-of-the-envelope calculation by Whittaker.

A spokesman for Virgin Galactic said the company is “exploring ways to offset carbon emissions for future customer flights.” While SpaceX did not comment directly on CO2 emissions, musk Has supports a CO2 tax Politics. Blue Origin has said its New Shepard missile uses carbon-free fuels like hydrogen and oxygen.

But there are far more commercial airplane flights than space launches – 39 million against 114 in 2018 – too many for the space industry to catch up in even the most ambitious of scenarios. Today missiles burn collectively approx. 0.1% as much fuel as airplanes, which makes their CO2 emissions compared to a rounding error.

Whittaker points out, however, that such calculations neglect the unknown, but likely substantial, carbon footprint of producing, transporting, and cooling the tons of fuel used in space launches

“While it doesn’t coincide with aviation, it’s still a great add-on,” he says.

To achieve carbon neutrality, he hopes the industry will follow Blue Origin’s lead and use carbon-free fuels as well as greener operations by producing fuel locally from renewable energy sources.

What missiles leave in the atmosphere

“If CO2 isn’t in the action, it’s the particles,” says Ross, who has spent decades studying the environmental impact of takeoffs.

The glowing flames that shoot out of a rocket’s engines indicate that when the vehicle burns, soot is produced, technically known as “black carbon”. Any rocket that burns carbon-based fuels like kerosene or methane injects these particles directly into the upper reaches of the atmosphere, where they are likely to circulate for four to five years.

There the growing layer of soot looks like a fine black umbrella. It absorbs solar radiation and effectively prevents sunlight from reaching the surface of the planet, similar to what is suggested Geoengineering schemes intends to temporarily cool the earth might work. Shiny alumina particles emitted by the solid rocket engines of NASA’s upcoming Space Launch System and China’s Long March 11 vehicle make the phenomenon worse by reflecting sunlight.

The effects of this unintended experiment are unknown – except that they could be significant. A simple simulation found by Ross and a colleague in 2014 that the primary cooling effect of dozens of rocket launches is already equivalent to the warming effect of carbon dioxide released by millions of commercial flights.

That’s not to say that the aerospace industry is offsetting the environmental impact of flying. Infusing the atmosphere with novel particles has complex effects, says Ross. For example, their rough model showed that rocket launches cooled some locations by 0.5 degrees Celsius, while they heated the Arctic by more than 1 degree Celsius. And the simulation didn’t try to include side effects, such as whether takeoffs would create clouds or kill. More sophisticated modeling could show that exhaust particulate matter exacerbates overall warming, says Ross.

Other emissions and ozone

Space launches also worry some researchers because rockets emit their exhaust gases directly into the stratosphere, home to the protective ozone layer that blocks harmful ultraviolet light.

Most solid rocket engines emit alumina particles and chlorine gas, which promote chemical reactions that break down ozone into molecular oxygen. SpaceX and Blue Origin have switched to liquid fuels, which are typically less harmful but still contain by-products, including water vapor and nitrogen oxides, which can break down ozone during the years they circulate in the upper atmosphere.

“They’re not harmless,” says Eloise Marais, an atmospheric researcher at University College London. “They have an impact on the atmosphere.”

Marais is working on a prediction of how the current portfolio of rocket fuels could thin the ozone layer in the not too distant future. She has explored the impact of current launches and a speculative scenario where space tourism is proving popular and reliable enough to support a few suborbital launches a day and an orbital launch every week.

The calculations need to be reviewed before release, Marais says, but preliminary results suggest that while today’s launches have little impact on ozone, a booming space tourism industry could begin to change that.

“The effect is big enough that we could worry if the industry grew beyond what we speculate,” she says.

How often the companies will start in the future remains uncertain. Virgin Galactic says it hopes to operate at some point 400 flights per year. SpaceX introduces itself Passengers with spaceship shuttle between major cities in less than an hour, competing with commercial airlines.

Balancing space advances with environmental concerns

Access to space has revolutionized weather forecasting, communications technology, and researchers’ ability to understand how human activities have changed the Earth’s climate. It has also enabled space-based facilities like the International Space Station and a fleet of space telescopes to conduct transformative basic research.

In the future, a thriving space industry could create practical projects from clean, space-based solar energy to Asteroid mining, as well as the search for life in the solar system and other scientific endeavors.

Researchers like Ross don’t want to stop this progress. Rather, they hope to make this possible by identifying potential environmental problems early on. Today’s embryonic space industry is largely harmless, and Ross suggests that an environmental research program could help keep it that way even at maturity.

Stratospheric aircraft could scan rocket clouds directly to learn exactly what they are spewing out, while satellites and ground-based observatories monitor the atmosphere for short-, medium- and long-term effects of take-offs. There is also the unknown effects of obsolete satellites “burning up” and throwing tons of metal particles into the upper atmosphere. Supercomputers could run extensive simulations to determine what levels and types of space activity can be safely conducted.

“We want to avoid a surprising future,” says Ross. “We would like to say that the space industry can now move forward sustainably.”

Astra inventory ASTR drops after House Pressure launch try abort

[The livestream has ended. A replay of the webcast is available above.]

Astra room abort its first attempt to start since the company went public, igniting the rocket’s engines for a moment and then turning them off.

The missile did not take off from the ground due to the aborted launch, and Astra said it will investigate the cause of the problem. The company hopes to be able to make another start attempt on Saturday.

Astra shares fell more than 10% in after-hours trading from Friday’s close of trading at $ 11.67, before partially rebounding and falling about 6%.

A screenshot of the livestream at the start of the company shows how the LV0006 rocket engines briefly ignited before an abort caused the experiment to be postponed.

Astra

Astra launches its LV0006 rocket from the Pacific Spaceport Complex in Kodiak, Alaska. The US Space Force is the first paying customer for an Astra launch where a test payload flies on the rocket.

The vehicle is 43 feet tall and fits in the small missile segment of the introductory market. Astra’s goal is to launch as many small rockets as possible, with the goal of launching one rocket a day by 2025 and bringing the price even lower from $ 2.5 million.

The mission will test a variety of upgrades to the Astra missile since its last mission in December. While this previous mission made it into space, the rocket only briefly reached orbit.

LV0006 on the launch pad in Kodiak, Alaska.

Astra

The company’s time slot for this launch is 16 days through September 11th. A delayed missile launch attempt, known in the industry as a scrub, can occur for a variety of reasons, ranging from bad weather to technical issues.

Astra is partnered with NASA space travel – a space industry content organization not affiliated with the US agency – to webcast the launch.

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House firm Momentus MNTS begins buying and selling on Nasdaq after SPAC

Artist’s impression of a Momentus Vigoride transfer vehicle sending satellites in orbit.

Momentum

Space company Momentum Debuted on the Nasdaq on Friday, completing an almost year-long and turbulent merger process that resulted in a new CEO and the departure of the founders.

“In terms of value to investors, I think we are well positioned to meet some big market trends,” Momentus CEO John Rood, who led the company on Aug. 1, told CNBC. “There is a need for what we offer.”

Momentus stock fell as much as 9% in trading from its previous closing price of $ 10.97 per share.

The company has its this week Merger with Stable Road Capital, a Purpose Acquisition Company, or SPAC. A SPAC raises money from investors through an IPO and then uses the money to buy a private company and take it public.

Momentus’ path to the public market has been fought on several fronts, with missions now being postponed until mid-2022 at the earliest. National security concerns over Russian co-founders, former CEOs Mikhail Kokorich and Lev Khasis, led both of them to sell their stake – in exchange for “about $ 40 million,” Rood said – and leave the company.

Momentus’ valuation was then cut in half, from $ 1.1 billion to $ 567 million. And then, last month, the firm and Stable Road settled the Securities and Exchange Commission’s charges that the companies misled investors and falsified the results of a 2019 prototype test, paying about $ 8 million in civil fines.

The company expected to have $ 310 million on its books after the SPAC merger to grow, but the complications of the process reduced that cash to about $ 150 million “to fund our operations,” Rood said .

“We think that gives us enough runway to do our extra development work, add staff and some of the other things we need to do,” said Rood.

Rood described Momentus as an “early stage technology company” as it is now testing a new variant of its water-based plasma motors called the Microwave Electrothermal Thruster. The company told CNBC that the longest single fire on any of these engines took 9.7 hours in a vacuum chamber during ground tests, “significantly longer than what we would expect for a single fire in orbit.”

The thruster is critical to Momentus’ business plan, which involves launching satellites from rockets into specific orbits using a spacecraft called the Vigoride. Consisting of a frame, a thruster, solar panels, avionics, and a series of satellite booms, the spacecraft is specifically designed for satellites that carry large rockets, an increasingly popular industry practice called ride sharing.

The company had planned to launch its first Vigoride mission earlier this year, but ongoing national security reviews resulted in the spacecraft being removed from SpaceX carpool launches. The delay has also caused Momentus to lose customers and its backlog to drop from $ 90 million to $ 66 million.

Kokorich

The former CEO Kokorich did allegedly left the country, and did not resolve the SEC’s charges against him.

“We have no business relationships with Mikhail Kokorich or the other founders of the company. In fact, our national security agreement with the Department of Defense prohibits that,” said Rood.

When asked if Momentus or anyone on his team has been communicating with Kokorich since he left, Rood said the conversations weren’t professional or technological.

“If they are [talking to Kokorich]”It’s social and we need to keep a record of it,” said Rood.

looking ahead

Artist’s impression of a Momentus Vigoride transfer vehicle deploying a satellite in orbit.

Momentum

While Momentus has revised its financial guidance, the company still has an ambitious target of more than $ 2 billion.

The company expects to be profitable on an EBITDA basis by 2024, a goal that Momentus will have to fly 26 missions this year. Rood said that while Momentus works to address the Pentagon’s concerns and acquire a launch license, it has built two Vigoride starships and will work on more once testing is complete.

“We are in the process of assembling, testing and qualifying additional Vigoride vehicles,” said Rood.

Momentus’ early missions will serve as both tests of Vigoride and transportation of satellites from paying customers, he noted. The company is reducing its prices for these customers.

“We’re trying to make it more attractive to customers early on,” said Rood.

Another key to Momentus’ success is the availability and cost of launches, with the former steadily increasing and the latter decreasing in recent years – largely due to the ridesharing Elon Musk’s SpaceX offers on its Falcon 9 rockets.

“We have an agreement with SpaceX and are at a stage … where we can get the go-ahead from the federal government for our launch licenses, then we can book a manifest on a SpaceX rocket and go with them. Said Rood.

The partnership with SpaceX is “very valuable and something we value,” added Rood. But Momentus can’t rely on just one means of getting into space, so Vigoride is designed to be “launch vehicle independent,” Rood said, and “there are other vendors we speak to.”

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