Covid vaccine boosters are actually out there. This is who’s eligible for Pfizer, Moderna and J&J’s pictures

A patient receives on 29.

Emily Elconin | Reuters

Nearly 100 million people across the country are immediately entitled to a Covid booster vaccination after the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has additional doses of. have approved Modern and Johnson & Johnson‘s vaccines Thursday night.

The agency’s decision also allows fully immunized individuals to combine their booster vaccinations with doses from different manufacturers after research by the National Institutes of Health showed that combining and combining vaccines was safe and effective. Pfizer and BioNTech‘s boosters were largely released for use in the United States on September 24th.

About 11.6 million people across the country have already received their boosters, and CDC approvals have opened them up to tens of millions more people. But not everyone is eligible. Here’s who gets the extra doses in the U.S. based on their first round of shooting:

Pfizer-BioNTech

More than 47 million Pfizer vaccine recipients who received both vaccinations at least six months ago were eligible for a booster on Friday, according to data presented to the CDC’s advisory committee on Thursday. This contains:

  • Everyone who is 65 and older.
  • All adults between the ages of 18 and 64 who have cancer, dementia, diabetes, heart disease, HIV, and other conditions that make Covid complications more likely.
  • Anyone over the age of 18 who live or work in a long-term care facility, homeless shelter and prison or other community facility.
  • Frontline workers aged 18 and over who are at higher risk of Covid exposure due to their work, including first responders, teachers, supermarket workers and local transit workers.

Modern

According to the CDC presentation, more than 39.1 million Moderna vaccine recipients who received both vaccinations at least six months ago were able to receive a booster on Friday. The CDC has adopted the same criteria for Moderna recipients as Pfizer, as the two companies use the same mRNA technology in their Covid vaccines. They include.

  • Everyone who is 65 and older.
  • All adults between the ages of 18 and 64 who have cancer, dementia, diabetes, heart disease, HIV, and other conditions that make Covid complications more likely.
  • Anyone over the age of 18 who live or work in a long-term care facility, homeless shelter and prison or other community facility.
  • Frontline workers aged 18 and over who are at higher risk of Covid exposure due to their work, including first responders, teachers, supermarket workers and local transit workers.

Johnson & Johnson

The CDC has adopted slightly different criteria for J & J’s one-time Covid vaccine, making nearly 13 million recipients eligible as of Friday. This contains

  • All adults who were vaccinated with J & J’s Covid vaccine at least two months ago, instead of Pfizer and Moderna six months ago.
  • All adult J&J recipients are entitled to a booster vaccination, even if they do not have any underlying medical conditions or work or live in an occupation where there is a higher risk of Covid.

FDA panel unanimously recommends Moderna Covid booster pictures for at-risk adults

A key advisory committee to the Food and Drug Administration unanimously recommended Thursday that booster shots be taken from ModernCovid-19 vaccine for people 65 and older and other Americans at risk. The vote was a critical step before the US can begin giving third vaccinations to some of the more than 69 million people who originally received this vaccine.

The non-binding decision of the Advisory Committee on Vaccines and Allied Biological Products of the FDA would extend the guidelines for Moderna with the third recordings of the FDA PfizerBioNTech Vaccination. These recordings were authorized less than a month ago to a wide range of Americans, including the elderly, adults with pre-existing medical conditions, and those who work or live in high-risk environments such as healthcare and grocery stores.

Although the agency has not always followed the advice of its committee, it often does. A final FDA decision on Moderna boosters could be made within days. A CDC Vaccines Advisory Committee is then expected to vote on the FDA’s proposal next week. If it recommends approval and the CDC endorses it, eligible Americans who completed their vaccinations at least six months ago could begin booster vaccinations immediately.

Booster vaccination has been a controversial issue for scientists – inside and outside of government – especially since many people in the US and other parts of the world have not yet received a single dose of a vaccine. The World Health Organization is urging wealthy countries to wait before distributing boosters, and some scientists say they are not convinced that most Americans need boosters right now.

When the FDA committee met last month, they opposed a proposal to distribute booster vaccines from Pfizer and BioNTech to the general public. Some committee members said at the time they were concerned that there wasn’t enough data to make a recommendation, while others argued that third shots should be restricted to specific groups.

After Moderna’s unanimous vote on Thursday, committee member Dr. Patrick Moore said the data the company submitted for approval of a booster was “not well explained,” adding that he was more on “gut instinct”.

“The data itself is not strong, but it is certainly going in a direction that supports this vote,” he said.

Some members said the boosters should prevent what they call breakthrough infections, which they believe are critical to protecting healthcare facilities from being overloaded, while other members said the third vaccinations should ensure high-risk patients don’t have serious illnesses. Some committee members also suggested that young people might not need boosters as the first few shots in these groups still persist.

Dr. Another member, Paul Offit, stressed that most people who received the first two doses of Moderna’s vaccine are still well protected and hopes the recommendation doesn’t send the “wrong message” to the public.

“If we’re trying to prevent the inevitable, which is a decline in neutralizing antibodies and an erosion of protection against mild or asymptomatic infections, that’s a high bar that we don’t hold any other vaccine by,” he told his colleagues.

The Biden government hopes the extra dose will provide long-term and permanent protection for the US population from serious illness, hospitalization, and death as the fast-paced Delta variant continues to spread.

Dr. Peter Marks, the FDA’s chief vaccine regulator, reached the committee Thursday before the vote, telling the panel of experts that the agency is promoting “all the different viewpoints” on the “complex and evolving” data.

“However, I would ask you, as we move forward, to do our best to focus our reflections on the science related to the proposal under consideration today and not on operational issues related to a booster campaign or related issues global vaccine justice. ”he added.

Moderna filed for FDA approval of a booster dose on September 1. The company said the results are based on a clinical study of about 170 adults, fewer than the 318 people screened for Pfizer’s booster vaccination. Moderna said a third half-dose shot – 50 micrograms – was safe for the first two injections and produced a strong immune response.

Once approved, the company plans to send a letter to health care providers explaining the dose difference for the third injection, said Dr. Jacqueline Miller, the company’s director of infection research, during a presentation Thursday.

The side effects of Moderna boosters were similar to those after the second dose, the company wrote in a document released Tuesday by the FDA. Most of the side effects were of minor severity and Moderna reported no cases of rare heart inflammation, myocarditis, or pericarditis in subjects for up to 29 days after receiving the booster.

Before recommending the third shots, the panel listened to several presentations, including from Israeli health officials, who began to offer boosters to their populations before many other countries. The country has mainly used Pfizer’s vaccine, but some Moderna boosters have been given.

Israel has given 3.7 million third vaccinations since its booster campaign began in late July, with about a third of the extra vaccinations going to people aged 60 and over, Sharon Alroy Price, director of public health at Israel’s Ministry of Health, told the panel.

She presented data suggesting that people receiving a booster dose are less likely to get infected with Covid or become seriously ill. She said officials have so far identified 17 cases of myocarditis or pericarditis after third doses.

“I think we can say, if we look at all of the data in Israel so far, that the use of booster doses has helped Israel reduce the infections and the severe cases,” she said.

– CNBC’s Robert Towey contributed to this report.

U.S. strikes nearer to clearing Moderna and J&J Covid booster photographs this week

Anjali Sundararaman, a student nurse at San Francisco State University, gives Cuixia Xu a dose of Moderna-COVID during a vaccination clinic at the Southeast Health Center in the Bayview-Hunters Point neighborhood of San Francisco, Calif. On Monday, February 24 19 vaccine. 8, 2021.

Stephen Lam | San Francisco Chronicle | Hearst Newspapers via Getty Images

Millions of Americans will be one step closer to getting a Covid-19 booster shot this week when a key Food and Drug Administration advisory panel meets on Thursday and Friday to discuss additional doses of the drug Modern and Johnson & Johnson Vaccinations.

The FDA’s Advisory Committee on Vaccines and Related Biological Products meets less than a month after US regulators authorized Covid booster recordings from Pfizer and BioNTechs Vaccine for a wide variety of Americans, including the elderly, adults with pre-existing conditions, and those who work or live in high-risk environments such as health and food workers.

More than 7 million Americans in the US received a booster dose as of Saturday, according to the latest data from the CDC.

Members on independent committees of the FDA and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said at the time they were frustrated that Pfizer recipients only entitled to get the extra shots, leaving out millions of Americans who got Moderna or J & J’s shots.

The FDA advisory group is due to discuss data on the safety and effectiveness of a Moderna booster in adults on Thursday. On Friday, the committee is expected to discuss J&J booster vaccinations for adults. The FDA could make a final decision within days of the meetings and pass it on to the CDC and its Vaccine Advisory Committee to make their own decision.

The CDC’s next vaccine advisory meeting is scheduled for October 20 through October 21, where the boosters are expected to be discussed.

The FDA meeting is based on the average daily Covid cases in the US fell below 100,000 last week more than 56% of the population are fully immunized against the virus and the pandemic is showing signs of easing. Getting vaccinated, getting booster shots, and avoiding large gatherings are crucial ways to mitigate a possible surge in cases over the holidays, according to health experts.

The Biden administration hopes that empowering the U.S. population will continue to provide long-term and lasting protection from serious illness, hospitalization, and death as the fast-paced Delta variant spreads.

The exposure led to an increase in hospital admissions in the US, mainly among the unvaccinated. Still, some vaccinated Americans have suffered what are known as breakthrough infections, and just over 19,000 of them – less than 1% – were hospitalized or died of Covid on Sept. 20, according to the CDC.

“Even with Delta, the current vaccines hold up reasonably well in terms of hospitalization and major illness,” said Norman Baylor, former director of the FDA’s vaccines office. “It’s the infections that seem to be a problem.”

Last month, Moderna said a third syringe at half the dose used for the first two injections was safe and produced a stronger immune response than that seen after the second dose in its phase III clinical trial .

J&J said last month that a second dose of its single vaccine was safe and increased protection against symptomatic infections from about 70% to 94% when given two months after the first dose in the US.

The FDA could approve Moderna and J&J booster syringes under the same criteria as Pfizer, or maybe change course and increase the number of Americans eligible for additional syringes, Baylor said in a telephone interview.

“The question is: does everyone need a booster now?” said Baylor, now president of the Biologics Consulting Group.

Committee members need to discuss whether it is safe and effective for J&J recipients to receive a second dose, Baylor said. He added that he did not expect any difficulty in getting third-dose approval of Moderna’s vaccine because it uses mRNA technology that was also used to develop Pfizer’s vaccines.

“If I was in my old position with the FDA, I probably wouldn’t have put Moderna on the advisory board because it’s in the same class as Pfizer,” he said.

Government communication on Pfizer booster vaccinations is already confusing and “very harmful” to public perception, said Dr. Isaac Bogoch, an infectious disease specialist at the University of Toronto.

“From the outside it looks a bit free for everyone,” said Bogoch. “Yeah, yeah, there are some loose guidelines in the United States. But basically it looks like anyone could go to any pharmacy and get a booster shot and say you know what I smoke or I’m obese or.” I work in healthcare. “

Elon Musk takes photographs at Biden, SEC anti-nuclear sentiment at Code

Elon Musk, CEO of Tesla, stands in the foundry of the Tesla Gigafactory during a press event. Year.

Patrick Pleul | Image Alliance | Image Alliance | Getty Images

SpaceX and Tesla CEO Elon Musk on Tuesday criticized President Joe Biden for saying his administration was “biased” against Tesla, saying that during a speech on stage at the Code Conference in Beverly Hills, California, unions “ seems to be controlled.

Musk also, in his typically disrespectful form, reiterated several of his previous taunts against state financial regulators at the Securities and Exchange Commission, reiterating his support for cryptocurrency and nuclear power, and saying he was there despite the recent antitrust and cryptocurrency attacks.

Beef with biden

Code host and Recode editor Kara Swisher asked Musk to explain the recent tweets he made rebuked President Joe Biden.

Musk sighed. “You know, Biden held this EV summit – didn’t invite Tesla. Invited by GM, Ford, Chrysler and UAW. “

“Does that sound a little biased or something? And you know, just – it’s not the friendliest administration. Seems to be controlled by unions, as far as I can tell. “

Swisher asked him if he was waiting to get former President Donald Trump back or to become president himself, and he said no in both cases.

About taxes

Swisher asked Musk, who is currently the richest person in the world, according to Bloomberg – To respond to criticism that while his companies have received many government contracts and subsidies, the CEO has avoided paying some taxes personally in the US through creative, albeit legal, accounting practices.

In June, investigative news site ProPublica reported on Musk’s tax bill as part of a massive analysis of billionaires’ finances. They found that Musk’s income tax bill was zero in 2018.

Musk insulted ProPublica’s coverage, calling it “tricky” and “misleading”.

Then he said the number was so small because he wasn’t getting a salary, so his cash compensation was basically zero. Instead, Musk borrows money in exchange for stock options that vest over time.

Since he had accumulated more and more shares in Tesla and SpaceX, he had “not really bothered” to take money off the table by selling a stake. The success of SpaceX and Tesla is far from certain, said Musk. “You have gone bankrupt many times. But I never tried to take money off the table.

The publicly traded Tesla has never notified shareholders that it was on the verge of bankruptcy.

When Musk’s stock options expire at Tesla, its marginal tax rate will be over 50%, the CEO said. “I have a number of options that expire early next year, so … a huge block of options will be sold in the fourth quarter – because I have to, or they will expire.”

“So are you going to pay a lot of taxes at some point?” said Swisher.

“Massive, yes,” said Musk. “Basically, a lot of what I sell will be taxes.”

He said critics might believe wealthy people borrowing against their stocks are “a ploy to get away from paying taxes”. But, he said, this is not uncommon and can be a risky move. “Borrowing for stocks is kind of fun and game until you get into a recession and hit the margin calls and then go to zero, which basically happens every time a recession hits.”

“I definitely put on the record and said that I think our stock price is too high in my opinion, and that hasn’t stopped the stock price from rising,” he said. “So … I don’t know – what should I do, you know? The audience laughed.

“I think it’s important to keep in mind that my actual tax rate is 53%. They’re trying to make it look like I’m paying very low taxes, but the reality is that my taxes are very high. … be paid out in the next three months due to options expiring, “he said.

When asked for comment by CNBC, ProPublica responded with the following statement from Editor-in-Chief Stephen Engelberg:

“Elon Musk’s remarks confirm the veracity of our reporting, which disclosed that he did not pay federal income taxes in 2018. As we have highlighted in our story, Musk has supported his lifestyle by borrowing money against his stock holdings, a textbook example for the known strategy. ” as ‘buy, borrow and die.’ We have pointed out in our history that his tax payments to the government over the past few years were only a tiny fraction of his multi-billion dollar asset appreciation. “

ProPublica sent Musk detailed questions before releasing her June story and he didn’t answer. At Tuesday’s conference, Musk said ProPublica was “not interested” in the truth about its finances.

“We remain interested in his comments on the US tax system or his own strategies to minimize his tax obligations,” Engelberg said on Wednesday.

On twitter

Swisher also asked Musk about his extensive and sometimes combative use of Twitter. “Go over us if you decide to tweet,” she said.

Musk answered Swisher in a sarcastic tone.

“Well, I think about it for hours. And I consult my strategy team,” he said, laughing with the audience. “Or maybe I’m exhausted and then brrrr-psshht! Path! Let me shoot me in the foot, bam! Now let me shoot me in the foot, bam! That describes some of my tweets. “

In 2018, the SEC sued Tesla and Musk for securities fraud after the CEO wrote on Twitter that he was considering making Tesla private for $ 420 per share and securing funding.

They eventually settled that lawsuit, with Musk and Tesla each paying a $ 20 million fine to federal agencies and Musk relinquishing his role as Tesla’s CEO. Musk also agreed to have his tweets reviewed by a compliance officer at Tesla before posting them if they contained material company information.

“Are you concerned about potential SEC involvement in your tweets?” asked Swisher.

Musk said, “What does that mean again? I know the middle word is ‘Elon’, but I can’t remember the other two words.”

She asked him to answer seriously. “Are you afraid they’ll say, ‘Elon, stop … tweeting.'”

“You mean the Short Selling Enrichment Commission?” Musk asked.

Both comments were allusions to insults Musk made on Twitter in 2020 and 2018, respectively, to the financial regulator.

Crypto and China

Tesla made waves in February when it announced it had bought about Bitcoin worth $ 1.5 billion. After the stocks were announced, the price of Bitcoin skyrocketed. In May, when Musk said on Twitter that Tesla stop accepting bitcoins as payment for his electric cars the price of Bitcoin has fallen.

When Musk tweets a recommendation for a specific coin – like he did with Dogecoin – its price tends to rise, at least temporarily.

When Swisher asked about regulating cryptocurrencies, Musk said the SEC should pull out.

“Just let it fly” he suggested.

The People’s Bank of China recently made all cryptocurrency-related activities illegal. Swisher asked Musk if he had any concerns about working in China or if he was concerned about US-China relations.

After praising Tesla’s employees and the vehicle assembly plant in Shanghai, Musk said he was “not particularly” concerned about China right now. As the pandemic subsides and face-to-face meetings resume, “trust” in China with tech companies and overseas companies would “go in a more positive direction,” Musk predicted.

Musk said he believes China may not accept the cryptocurrency in part because of the electricity shortage there and the huge amount of electricity required to mine Bitcoin. However, he also said that cryptocurrency’s potential to diminish the power of centralized governments could make China suspicious.

When Swisher said that Musk alone could “change the shares” of the cryptocurrency more than China did, Musk admitted it. She asked him if that was a good thing. “If it goes up, I suppose,” he said.

Space and energy

Swisher and Musk discussed at length about SpaceX, its competitors, plans to expand the Starlink satellite Internet service, and ambitions to make humanity a “multi-planetary species”.

During their SpaceX discussion, Musk took the opportunity to mock the phallic shape of Blue Origin’s rocket and berate Jeff Bezos for his space travel Company litigation.

“Can you explain, from a technological point of view, why it is this shape?” asked Swisher.

The characteristically rough Musk said, “If you’re only flying suborbitally, your rocket can be a little shorter, yes.”

Musk has stated that he doesn’t actually speak to her Amazon Founder, instead sub-tweets him – meaning he tweets about Bezos without addressing him directly.

When asked about SpaceX creation Light pollution This affected the work of astronomers, Musk said: “We are working very hard to ensure that our satellites do not interfere with their telescopes.” SpaceX could launch some new telescopes with the Starship vehicle, he said, that would have 10 times the resolution of the Hubble. He said that only amateur astronomers are complaining about SpaceX today.

At the end of the session, an audience member asked if Musk was concerned that utility companies might be able to generate and transmit enough electricity to power electric vehicles as they become more popular.

Musk estimates that electricity needs will roughly double as the world switches from gas-powered to electric vehicles.

“This will create a lot of challenges with the grid,” he said. He said he sees the demand as “impracticable” unless significant local electricity generation in households is added by means such as residential solar products such as those sold by Tesla.

In addition to rooftop solar, he said we need to add “large, sustainable power generation developments, mostly wind and solar” to the grid and combine them with battery packs to offset the intermittent nature of renewable energy.

As a final thought, Musk added:

“I’m kind of in favor of nuclear power too. And I’m kind of surprised by the public opinion against nuclear power. I’m not saying that we should build a whole series of new nuclear power plants. But I don’t think we should.” You have that in Germany and had to build a number of coal-fired power plants, and I honestly think that wasn’t the right decision. “

FDA backs Pfizer Covid booster photographs for older and weak folks

The Food and Drug Administration authorized Pfizer and BioNTechCovid-19 booster vaccination for people 65 and older and other at-risk Americans six months after completing their first two doses, leaving many Americans now eligible to receive the vaccinations.

The FDA’s decision on Wednesday, which has yet to be reviewed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, largely follows the recommendations it received more than on Friday from its main vaccine advisory committee eight-hour agency meeting.

The CDC’s Vaccine Advisory Committee is expected to vote on the FDA’s proposal on Thursday afternoon. If she recommends approval and the CDC approves it, the booster shots could start right away.

Last week, the FDA Advisory Committee on Vaccines and Related Biological Products voted 16-2 against distributing the vaccines to Americans 16 and older, before unanimously adopting an alternative plan to older Americans and those at high risk of developing serious illnesses to get sick to give a booster if they get the virus.

Although Americans 65 and older make up about 17% of the US population, they are most at risk of dying from Covid and account for more than 77% of all Covid deaths, according to the CDC.

The FDA has issued emergency clearance to administer Pfizer shots to elderly Americans and people ages 18 to 64 with conditions that put them at serious risk of disease. The agency also added a broad definition of anyone between the ages of 18 and 64 “whose frequent institutional or professional exposure” to the virus puts them at high risk of developing serious complications from Covid. That leaves enough room for the CDC to potentially release third doses for people in nursing homes, prisons, frontline health workers, and other key workers who were among the first Americans to receive their first syringes in December.

“The FDA took into account the committee’s input and conducted its own thorough review of the submitted data in order to make today’s decision,” said Dr. Peter Marks, the agency’s lead vaccines agency, in a statement. “We will continue to analyze the data submitted to the FDA regarding the use of booster doses of COVID-19 vaccines and, if necessary, make further decisions based on the data.”

The non-binding decision of the vaccination board it was expected to be controversial As the Biden administration has announced, it plans to start offering booster shots to the public as early as this week pending approval from US health regulators.

Although the agency has not always followed the advice of its committee, it often does. Still, Marks reminded the panel on Friday that federal regulators did not have to accept their written recommendation.

“We’re not tied to your vote at the FDA just for you to understand. We can adjust this as needed, ”he said.

In releasing the vaccinations, which will only apply to people who received the original Pfizer vaccine, the FDA cited a small study by the company of around 300 people who received the booster, data from the UK, as well as more comprehensive but less stringent data , from the Israeli health authorities.

Some scientists, including at least two to the FDA, had said they were not entirely convinced that every American who had received the Pfizer vaccine would need extra doses at this point. The country’s leading health authorities, including CDC director Dr. Rochelle Walensky, Acting FDA Commissioner Dr. Janet Woodcock and White House Senior Medical Advisor Dr. Anthony Fauci, however, already approved Biden’s booster plan in August.

Friday’s vote put the FDA panel in an “uncomfortable position” as the government had already announced that it would begin distributing boosters to the general public this month, said Dr. Bruce Farber, Head of Infectious Diseases at healthcare provider Northwell Health, before the panel’s recommendation.

Some committee members said they were concerned that there wasn’t enough data to make a recommendation, while others argued that the third vaccination should be limited to certain groups, e.g. Some members raised concerns about the risk of myocarditis in younger people and said more research was needed.

Dr. Phil Krause, an FDA vaccine regulator who is leaving the agency under pressure from the Biden administration to approve the shots, criticized the results presented at the meeting, saying that much of the data has not been verified by the federal agency or a peer-reviewed . He said the models used are complex and scientists need to make sure they are “getting the right results.”

“That’s part of the difficulty of looking at this type of data without a way for the FDA to review it,” he said.

In the outlines of the plans for last month’s launch Distribute boosters this week, administration officials cited three CDC studies showing that vaccines protection against Covid has waned over several months. Senior health officials said at the time they feared protection from serious illness, hospitalizations and deaths could “wear off” in the coming months, especially for those at higher risk or vaccinated during the earlier stages of vaccination.

Pfizer said in documents released last week that an observational study in Israel showed that a third dose of the Covid vaccine restored infection protection to 95% six months after a second vaccination. The data was collected from July 1 to August 30 when the rapidly expanding delta variant emerged across the country.

In a presentation on Friday, Dr. Sharon Elroy-Price of the Israeli Ministry of Health said that if officials there had not started distributing boosters in late July, the country would likely have exceeded its hospital capacity. She said health officials had seen a trend in fully vaccinated people in their 40s and 50s who became seriously ill with Covid.

“We didn’t want to wait to see these results, and we knew we had to vaccinate a larger section of the population to get the numbers down quickly,” she told the committee. Israeli health officials expected an average of 2,000 serious cases by the end of August, she said. “We have been able to dampen this effect and our severe cases are around 700 or less and have remained stable even though we still have days with 10,000 confirmed cases.”

Pfizer Covid booster pictures seemingly prepared Sept. 20, Anthony Fauci says

The leading expert on infectious diseases, Dr. Anthony Fauci, responds to allegations made by Senator Rand Paul (R-KY) as he testifies before the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, the United States, on July 20, 2021 .

J. Scott Applewhite | Reuters

The US will likely begin to distribute widely Pfizer Covid-19 booster recordings in the week of September 20, but the rollout for ModernThe vaccine could be delayed, said Dr. Anthony Fauci, Chief Medical Officer of the White House, on Sunday.

The Biden government has announced plans to offer people who received the Pfizer and Moderna shots a third dose pending approval from health officials. The US recommends an additional injection eight months after the second dose.

Only the Pfizer Vaccine Booster can get Food and Drug Administration and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention approval in time for launch the week of September 20, Fauci said on CBS’s Face the Nation. People who have received Moderna shots may have to wait longer as the company waits for regulators to sign off a third dose.

“Looks like Pfizer has its data, will likely meet the deadline,” the director of the National Institute of Allergies and Infectious Diseases told CBS. “We hope Moderna could do that too, so we could do it at the same time.”

“But if not, we’ll do it one at a time,” he continued. “So the bottom line is that at least part of the plan is very likely to be implemented, but ultimately the entire plan will be implemented.”

CNBC policy

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Later on Sunday, Fauci told CNN that for people who received two doses of the Moderna vaccine, “it is better to wait for a third dose of Moderna” than to get an injection from Pfizer. He noted that the US plans to release data on mixing vaccines from different manufacturers in the coming weeks.

The PfizerBioNTech Covid-19 vaccine is the most widely administered vaccine in the U.S. More than 95 million people have received the full two-shot regimen. according to CDC data.

Approximately 66 million people were fully vaccinated with the Moderna syringe. Around 14 million people have now received the single dose Johnson & Johnson Shot. Regulators haven’t announced any plans for a J&J booster.

When calling for third doses of Pfizer and Moderna, US health officials cited CDC data which found that protection against infection waned several months after the second injection. According to the CDC, more than 1.3 million people received an extra vaccination after the US approved it for certain immunocompromised people.

White House Chief of Staff Ron Klain told CNN’s State of the Union on Sunday that the government will have booster vaccinations “ready for use” when regulators approve them for wider use.

An FDA advisory panel will review Pfizer’s application for a booster vaccination on September 17th, just three days before the injections are due to begin.

The Biden government’s booster plan has sparked criticism in the US and around the world. The World Health Organization has urged wealthy countries to increase vaccination rates hold off additional shots until poorer countries can give more people their first doses of vaccine.

As the virus spreads around the world, the prospect of new – and potentially more dangerous – variants increases.

The White House has defended its booster plan, citing US donations of vaccine doses to other countries. Last month, Fauci told CNBC that the US has given 120 million doses to 80 countries.

“We do both,” he said of vaccinating Americans and people around the world.

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CDC panel debates want for Covid vaccine booster pictures

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A key advisory group from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention meets Monday to consider booster coverage of Covid-19 vaccines for all eligible Americans.

The meeting of the Advisory Committee on Vaccination Practices of the CDC takes place after President Joe Biden. instead of said Friday US regulators are considering giving Covid booster vaccinations five months after completing the primary series and bringing forward the expected schedule for a third vaccination by three months.

Scientists have sharply criticized The Biden government’s urge to distribute booster syringes widely says the data provided by federal health officials are not compelling enough to currently recommend third vaccinations for most of the American population.

The Biden administration has publicly stated that the third dose will not be carried out without FDA approval and a vote by ACIP.

The advisory group is also due to vote on Monday on the full approval of Pfizer’s Covid vaccine for Americans 16 and older.

Biden says U.S. well being officers are contemplating Covid booster photographs at 5 months

United States President Joe Biden will meet with Israeli Prime Minister Naftali Bennett in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, DC on August 27, 2021.

Nicholas Comb | AFP | Getty Images

president Joe Biden said U.S. regulators are considering giving Covid-19 booster vaccinations five months after completing the primary series and postponing the expected schedule for a third vaccination by about three months.

Biden, who spoke to Israeli Prime Minister Naftali Bennett on Friday, said health officials are considering following this country’s example on boosters.

“We are considering the advice you have given that we should start earlier,” Biden said, adding that officials are discussing whether the schedule should be shorter. “It should only be five months and that is being discussed.”

Booster vaccination approval is expected to come sometime around Labor Day after federal health officials have time to review data from other countries.

Director of the National Health Institutes Dr. Francis Collins last week The data released by Israel on the effectiveness of Covid-19 vaccines over time caused US health leaders to reconsider their position on vaccine booster vaccinations. Israel released new data on Aug. 16 showing a reduction in the effectiveness of Pfizer’s Covid vaccine against serious illness in people 65 and over who were fully vaccinated in January or February.

Israel released more data on Sunday showing that a booster dose offers four times as much protection from infection by the Delta variant than the previous two-dose therapy in people over 60, Reuters reported, citing data from the Israeli Ministry of Health. The booster dose was also five to six times more effective in preventing hospitalization or serious illness.

About 1.5 million Israeli residents have received a booster dose of a Covid-19 vaccine.

Later in the day, White House spokeswoman Jen Psaki explained Biden’s comments, saying he would rely on CDC and FDA officials to make changes to formal U.S. health guidelines, which currently state that booster doses are given after eight months should be.

“So I want to be very clear. If they were to change their leadership based on data for a certain group, he would of course stick to it,” Psaki said at a press conference on Friday. “But for the folks at home watching, for all of you reporting this, nothing has changed about the eight month timeline in relation to the boosters.”

Other countries including the Dominican Republic, Hungary and Germany have either started, are about to, or are considering booster vaccinations.

Pfizer said Wednesday that a booster dose of its vaccine triple neutralizing antibodies in an unpublished study as the company battles for FDA approval for its booster doses, according to Reuters.

The study also found that the side effects after a third dose are the same as after a second dose. Common side effects include headache, lethargy, mild pain at the injection site, and fever.

The distribution of the booster vaccinations is expected to begin on September 20 pending final approval from the Food and Drug Administration and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Biden government and vaccine manufacturers have indicated that there should be enough doses for any fully vaccinated adult aiming for a third dose.

Correction: This article has been updated to correct the timing of when a potential third dose of Covid could be administered. Five months after the full vaccination.

To get pictures in arms, governments flip to cash in pockets

Millions of people in the US who haven’t received the COVID-19 vaccine may soon have a new reason to roll up their sleeves: money in their pockets.

President Joe Biden urges states and local governments to join those who are already spending dollars on shots. New York, the largest city in the country, began giving away $ 100 prizes on Friday.

The president, health officials, and heads of state bet the financial incentive will encourage reluctant people to get the injection, as does the contagious and potentially more potent Delta variant sweeping parts of the country – especially those with low vaccination rates – and how the number of daily vaccinations drops sharply from its April high.

Jay Vojno, who received his vaccination in New York on Friday, said he thought some kind of incentive was coming so he was willing to wait until it did to vaccinate.

“I knew they would, so I just waited,” he said.

Bradley Sharp was among those given an injection in Times Square on Friday. The prospective college student had put it off but knew he needed to be vaccinated because the school he will attend requires it.

“I thought I’d come here and get it today and get my hundred dollars because I’m going to get it anyway,” Sharp said.

Other states are also starting programs to distribute money. New Mexico helped introduce cash incentives in June and launches another $ 100 spending on vaccinations on Monday. Ohio is offering $ 100 to government employees who get vaccinated.

Minnesota’s $ 100 incentive kicked off Friday, despite several people visiting Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport, vaccinated with Johnson & Johnson’s single-dose vaccine, hadn’t heard of the money.

Vidiya Sami, an office worker from the Richfield suburb of Minneapolis, went to the airport because it was the only place that offered the “one-and-done” vaccine.

“That’s why I chose it,” said Sami.

She said she delayed the injection because at first she was afraid to “read especially about … other people’s side effects”.

“And then I kind of made myself more paranoid by joining Facebook groups and reading everyone else’s symptoms after they got the injections,” she said. “Basically, I was just scared, but the more I researched you know the benefits outweighed the disadvantages.”

Incentives aren’t new: States have tried lottery-style giveaways, free beer, gift cards, and more. Whether they result in more people being vaccinated is not clear, said Harald Schmidt, assistant professor at the University of Pennsylvania and a research fellow at the school’s Center for Health Incentives and Behavioral Economics.

Turning to such measures suggests that governments face some degree of desperation in trying to get shots in the gun, he said.

“It is right to be alarmed,” said Schmidt. “It is right to think about how we can fix this ship.” He added that he understood the motivations behind cash incentives, but asked why they were needed in the first place.

“If we just stick needles in our arms, we haven’t made any real progress in the bigger picture, namely that entire communities lack trust in health systems or government,” he said.

The Biden government is counting on the incentives to work. In a statement this week, the White House cited a grocery chain offering its workers $ 100 to get the COVID-19 vaccination and then vaccination rates rose.

State and local governments can use the federal bailout funds to provide the $ 100, according to the statement.

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Associated Press Writer Steve Karnowski in Minneapolis; David Martin in New York; Morgan Lee in Santa Fe, New Mexico; and Andrew Welsh-Huggins of Columbus, Ohio contributed to this report.

Covid vaccines work however extra folks must get the pictures: U.S. physician

Vaccines work against Covid-19, including the highly contagious Delta variant – but the challenge is getting enough people vaccinated, according to a professor of preventive medicine at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine.

“It doesn’t help to leave it in the refrigerator, it won’t prevent disease. You have to take this vaccine in your arms,” ​​William Schaffner said on CNBCs “Squawk Box Asia” On Monday.

Data compiled by the online academic publication Our World In Data showed around 22.6% of the world’s population have received at least one dose of a Covid-19 vaccine – but most of them are in high-income, affluent countries in North America and Western Europe.

Less than 1% of people in low-income countries have received at least one dose.

Covid booster recordings

It remains unclear whether those vaccinated against Covid-19 would need booster shots across the board.

A group of scientists from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said recently There is currently insufficient data to support the recommendation of a booster vaccination for the general population, but that more vulnerable groups such as the elderly or transplant recipients may need an additional dose.

Medical assistant Odilest Guerrier administers a Moderna COVID-19 vaccine to Pasqual Cruz at a clinic established by Healthcare Network in Immokalee, Florida on May 20, 2021.

Joe Raedle | Getty Images

Schaffner said the need for booster vaccinations would depend on two things.

“The length of time our current vaccines will be protected has yet to be determined, but so far so well, and whether new variants will emerge that can bypass the protection of our current vaccines,” he said, adding that such variants are still ongoing are appear. “We just have to get (Covid vaccines) more acceptance among the population.”

The coronavirus has mutated many times since the pandemic began last year.

A variant that experts say pose a major threat to the elimination of Covid-19 is Delta – a virulent strain that was first discovered in India and has since spread to over 90 countries around the world. Delta becomes the dominant variant disease worldwide and has been called “Variant of concern“From the World Health Organization.

Vaccine hesitate

Many countries face vaccine hesitation, in part due to misinformation spread about the gunfire.

Even in the United States, where more than 50% of the population received at least one dose of the vaccine, vaccination efforts in some states have hit a wall as the Delta variant is rapidly spreading across the country. It could become a potential problem in parts of the US, especially in rural areas, where vaccination rates remain low, making more people susceptible to the Delta variant.

We risk new variants that may escape the protection of our vaccine as the virus spreads. Not just here in the United States, but all over the world.

William Schaffner

Vanderbilt University Medical School

Schaffner said the US is in a “slightly better position” to tackle the new variant, but it is far from ideal. He explained that in some areas the vaccination rate achieved is between mid-20% to mid-30%, while the ideal range to stop the spread of the Delta variant is around 70% to 80%. Many people who are hospitalized for Covid-19 are either unvaccinated or partially vaccinated, according to Schaffner.

“The more transmissions that occur, the more new people are infected, the more opportunities the virus has to multiply. When it multiplies, it mutates. And when it mutates, it has the opportunity to create new variants, ”he said.

“We are threatened with new variants that can evade the protection of our vaccine the further the virus spreads. Not just here in the US, but all over the world, ”added Schaffner.