UK shortens Covid-19 isolation interval to 7 days in England

UK Health Secretary Sajid Javid speaks during a press conference on Downing Street on October 20, 2021 in London, England.

Toby Melville | WPA pool | Getty Images News

LONDON – The UK government has cut the mandatory Covid-19 self-isolation period in England from 10 days to seven days for those who receive negative lateral flow tests for two consecutive days.

Health Minister Sajid Javid announced on Wednesday that those who receive a negative lateral flow result on days six and seven of their quarantine period will be allowed to exit isolation to minimize disruption and remain “after expert clinical advice”.

the The UK is currently struggling with an increase in the highly portable Omicron variant, with fears that health services could be overwhelmed and economic activity depressed.

So far, the UK government has refused to emulate a number of countries in mainland Europe who strict containment measures imposed about the holiday season.

The mandatory isolation period was reduced from 14 days to 10 days at the end of 2020 as the alpha variant spread rapidly in different regions of the UK and the quarantine requirement for vaccinated close contacts of positive cases during the delta wave was lifted earlier this year.

Irene Petersen, a professor of epidemiology and health informatics at University College London, told CNBC on Wednesday that reducing isolation time is a good move, given that most people are not contagious beyond the seventh day and the requirement for consecutive negative tests most are Will reveal anomalies.

“I’ve looked at the sensitivity a little, and if you say a single test has a sensitivity of around 90%, if you combine the sensitivity of the two tests, you went up at 99%, and that means we will few have that are false negatives, “she said.

“Even if you consider that we are only, say, 10% contagious at this point, it would be less than 1 in 1,000 people who would be false negative afterwards. So I now think it is a sensible move to cut it down to seven days. “

Antiviral Advancement

The UK government also announced on Wednesday that it had signed two contracts for a total of 4.25 million courses of Covid-19 antiviral pills.

Pfizer announced on Wednesday that it will provide the country with an additional 2.5 million doses of its COVID-19 pill, Paxlovid, with a total of 2.75 million expected to be delivered over the course of 2022.

The UK government has also ordered 1.75 million additional courses of the pill Lagevrio (molnupiravir) from Merck Sharp and Dohme.

“This is a mammoth deal for the UK government and for patients across the country who will benefit from these antivirals in the coming months,” Javid said in a statement on Wednesday.

Molnupiravir is currently being launched in a national study called PANORAMIC, which is being carried out by Oxford University in close collaboration with centers for general practitioners.

“If you are 50 years of age or older, or have an underlying health condition and tested positive for Covid-19, sign up for the study as soon as possible and benefit from this remarkable treatment,” added Javid.

UNC Well being Superior Care at Residence shortens hospital stays, saves cash :: WRAL.com

– A new program from UNC Health enables many patients to leave the hospital earlier than possible and receive acute care at home. It is a program that will save the patient money and open up the much needed bed space in the hospital.

Local UNC TV legend Roy Underhill was recently a patient who benefited from the new program. His television show “The WoodWright Shop” is still on public television channels across the country.

“[It was] for 37 years. It’s one of the longest-running television programs, “said Underhill, who also teaches students how to use traditional woodworking tools as opposed to power tools.

His students come to his woodcarving school in Pittsboro, some from outside the United States. “In a next class we have a student from Norway who has seen all the shows,” said Underhill.

Less than a month ago, kidney infection robbed the 70-year-old of his strength. “It’s known as sepsis and is fatal,” Underhill said.

He was in the UNC emergency room 24 hours and spent another three days in acute care. However, Underhill was presented with a new option. He describes it this way: “They had a new program and they said I could be home and they would bring me hospital care!”

It’s called Advanced Care at Home, and it includes a home health monitoring system, backup power supplies and communication devices via a phone, and video via an iPad or even a button on a wristband.

“And so they actually see someone six to seven times a day, either virtually or in person,” said Ila Mapp, the program’s administrative director at UNC Health.

She says national data shows that patients recover more quickly on the program. “It allows patients to be more comfortable and in more control,” Mapp said.

She adds, “It’s the patients who aren’t quite sick enough to go to the hospital but can go home and still get the acute care they need.”

She says patients who receive home care are also less likely to get other hospital infections like MRSA or even COVID-19.

Underhill quickly accepted the home care offer. He said, “You wear your own clothes, you are in your own bed and only get the medication you need.”

Underhill points out that it’s also cheaper than staying in the hospital. “Releasing a hospital bed saves money, you get better faster. What’s not to like,” he said.

He’s also excited to be back in his own home as well as his wood construction school, sharing his old woodworking talents with eager students.

More on this

CDC shortens social distancing tips for colleges to three ft with masks

Giani Clarke, 18, a senior at Wilson High School, is taking a test in her AP Statistics class. The desks are being doubled to create more social distance.

Ben Hasty | MediaNews Group | Getty Images

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Friday revised their guidelines on social distancing in schools, stating that most students can now sit three feet apart instead of six feet while wearing masks.

The recommendation is for all K-12 students regardless of whether community transmission is low, moderate, or significant, the CDC said.

In communities with high transmission rates, the CDC recommends that middle and high school students stay at least three feet apart if schools cannot keep students and teachers in assigned groups, the agency said. In elementary schools, where younger children have been shown to have a lower risk of transmitting the virus than teenagers, children wearing masks can stay within three feet of them, according to the CDC.

The CDC said it continues to recommend a separation of at least two meters between adults in schools, as well as between adults and students. It is also recommended that you maintain a social distance of two meters in public areas, while dining, during indoor activities such as tape exercises and sports, and in environments outside of the classroom.

“CDC is committed to being at the forefront of science and to update our guidelines as new information becomes available,” said CDC Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky in a statement. “Through safe, face-to-face tuition, our children gain access to vital social and mental health services that prepare them for the future, in addition to the education they need to be successful.”

The updated guidelines of the federal health authorities follow a Study published last week Clinical Infectious Diseases magazine suggested that public schools could be safely reopened as long as children were three feet apart and other mitigation measures, such as wearing masks, were enforced.

Some schools had complained that adhering to the six-foot rule was impractical. The World health organization and the American Academy of Pediatrics both have a social distance of three feet. The Chief Medical Officer of the White House, Dr. Anthony Fauci said Thursday that curtailed social guidelines were “likely” to happen.

–CNBC’s Will Feuer contributed to this report.

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