Effectively-traveled chef finds a house in Shelby Park with Roman-style pizza restaurant

A well-traveled chef finds a home in Shelby Park with a Roman-style pizza restaurant

The chef, trained by Bobby Flay, opens a Roman-style pizza restaurant in the Shelby Park neighborhood, building on his childhood roots.

Updated: 8:50 p.m. EST November 19, 2021

Emil David grew up in Pampanga, a province in the Philippines northwest of Manilla. When he was 16, David’s mother lost her business due to a natural disaster and the family moved to Rome, Italy to start over. One of the things David liked most about Rome was the shops and bakeries selling square slices of Roman style pizza. Roman pizza, unlike the more common Neapolitan pizzas, has a thin crust like a flat focaccia and is usually cut into squares. “It was easy to buy these pizzas. You didn’t have to go to a restaurant. I just asked my mother for two euros and then went to a store to buy a slice of it. ”In October, David and his wife Liz opened Square Cut Pizza at 741 E. Oak St., Shelby Park. The couple also run an ice cream parlor called Sugar Room in the same 4,500 square foot space. Square Cut Pizza has an open kitchen, bar and seating for up to 50 people. There is also an outdoor area with seating for 8 to 10 people. To learn more about Square Cut Pizza, visit our media partner Louisville Business First.

Emil David grew up in Pampanga, a province in the Philippines northwest of Manilla. When he was 16, David’s mother lost her business due to a natural disaster and the family moved to Rome, Italy to start over.

One of the things David liked most about Rome was the shops and bakeries that sold square pieces of Roman pizza. Roman pizza, unlike the more common Neapolitan pizza, has a thin crust like a flat focaccia and is usually cut into squares.

“When I was in Rome it was just very comforting,” remembers David, 36. “It was easy to buy these pizzas. You didn’t have to go to a restaurant. I just asked my mother for two euros and then in went to a store to buy a disc. “

In October, David and his wife, Liz, opened Square Cut Pizza at 741 E. Oak St. in the Shelby Park neighborhood. The couple also run an ice cream parlor called Sugar Room in the same 4,500 square foot space.

Square Cut Pizza has an open kitchen, bar and seating for up to 50 people. There is also an outdoor area with seating for 8 to 10 people.

To learn more about Square Cut Pizza, visit our media partner Louisville Business First.

New arts present raises cash for Shelby County Animal Shelter | Neighborhood

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WDRB) – A new festival was held in Shelbyville this weekend to raise money for pets in need.

The Shelbyville Fall Art and Craft Show featured more than 80 vendors, food trucks, a petting zoo, and face painting over Labor Day weekend.

ArtSpark Productions’ Sherry Kremer says the first-time event was so successful that some vendors ran out of products on the first day.

Kremer used to work in tourism and wanted to develop a show that promotes regional companies – but not only regional companies benefited from the show.

“I wanted to create an event that would help the vendors, artisans and artists, and also benefit a local charity, so we chose Shelby County Animal Rescue,” said Kremer.

A number of raffles and promotions were also offered during the weekend to raise funds for the shelter.

Copyright 2021 WDRB-Medien. All rights reserved.

God Did It Ministries motorbike journey raises cash for group efforts – Shelby County Reporter

By NATHAN HOWELL | Employed author

ALABASTER – Almost 20 motorcycles cruised through Alabaster, Helena and Pelham on July 17th for the God Did It Ministries’ first motorcycle ride.

Sanchez Tanniehill, the organization’s founder, said the ride was a way to support the local community and raise awareness of his group’s efforts.

“We receive grants for some of the different projects we run,” said Tanniehill. “Unfortunately, they don’t always cover what we want to achieve. We thought this would be a great way to get into the community and raise some money for our activities. “

The ride began at Buck Creek Park in Alabaster, where a number of bikers waited eagerly to take to the streets as a visible representation of the organization.

They parked their motorcycles and stood up, even Tanniehill took a side seat on one of the motorcycles.
A volunteer stood in line, counted down, and the wheels were off.

“We ended up going down Alabama 119, over the intersection and came back to Shelby County 17 via Helena,” Tanniehill explained. “Helena and her police were so nice to help us. Then we drove through Pelham and your department met us there. Eventually we passed Oak Mountain State Park and worked our way back to Alabaster. “

The bike tour was a sight to see as it passed many of the normal Saturday events like farmers markets and local farm sales.

“I had a great time,” said Tanniehill. “The ride was so smooth.”

He said that from what he saw the riders were mutual.

“You loved it,” he added. “The cities were very cooperative to make sure everyone was safe. It was very good for our first run and everyone said they were ready to do it again. “

The organizers had cause for concern as rain had been a recurring problem in the past few weeks. They monitored the weather which in the end worked for them. Tanniehill attributed the success of the ride to prayer.
“It rained a little, but it didn’t last,” he explained. “I prayed and the Lord said, ‘I have you.’ In the end we didn’t have any worries. “

God Did It Ministries uses its funds to support community initiatives such as supplying local students with school supplies and other items, hosting community events and other things.

“I wanted the whole thing for the community to stand behind it and come together. I think it was a good first time, ”said Tanniehill. “Please keep praying for us.”

He said people interested in supporting the organization could purchase special patches for this run. Anyone interested in purchasing can log on to the God Did It Ministries Facebook page.

Cash for ‘charudie’: Calera mates increase greater than $2K for Tallapoosa County Ladies Ranch – Shelby County Reporter

From ALEC ETHEREDGE | Editor-in-chief

CALERA – Maggie Marling sat bored in the Timberline neighborhood of Calera on a typical summer day, sprinted to her father in her house and started yelling the best idea she ever had.

“Papa, papa, I want to open a lemonade stand,” she said ecstatically to her papa, who was trying to balance a business conversation in one ear and asking Maggie what she needed in the other. “Where can I get lemons? Where can I get cups? “

Her father George put the phone down for a brief second and told her to come up with a business plan.

“He said, ‘Look, you can’t do this without a plan. You have to create a business plan for me beforehand and bring it to me, then I’ll answer your questions, ‘”Maggie’s mom Brandi remembers. “I think George thought it would only keep her occupied for a few minutes, but it got to be a couple of days.”

The business plan

At the time, George didn’t know how seriously Maggie would take his advice to create a business plan, but she was determined to change someone’s life with her lemonade stand.

What started with an idea her father got on a business call turned into a 20-page business plan drawn in crayons and crayons.

“I went and got some crayons and pencils and all that,” Maggie recalls. “I entered all the details there, what the stand should look like, what I needed for the stand, whom I wanted to help myself and a list of charities.”

One of the pages highlighting what the sign on the booth should look like said “$ 2 fresh lemonade for Charudie”.

According to Brandi, the business plan had several ideas on how to help various ends and included her friend Jamison Garzarek.

“When they heard about the accident with the Tallapoosa County Girls Ranch and all the children who had lost their lives, the girls got to know the ranch and knew this was the charity they wanted to help,” Brandi said.

So the two friends set about creating the best lemonade stand with their business plan.

Thanks to the help of the community, they got all the materials they needed and set up the stand from June 25th to 26th.

When life gives you lemons, you open a lemonade stand for charity

The next step in the business plan was trying to figure out how to get people to come to their lemonade stand by the Timberline pool, tucked away from the main drag. This became the easiest part of the plan, however, when the girls announced on Facebook that they wanted to raise funds for the Tallapoosa County Girls Ranch.

The ranch’s heart was torn on Saturday, June 19, when eight ranch children died after the bus that brought them home from a beach excursion was part of a tragic pile-up on Interstate 65.

A total of 10 people who were involved in the wreck died, including a father and his 9-month-old daughter in a car and the eight ranch girls on their bus.

Tallapoosa Girls Ranch is one of four across the state established by sheriff departments to help children in need. Some have often been abandoned by their parents or are growing up in broken homes, but the ranch takes them in to create a Christian family atmosphere that offers them the best opportunities in life.

This particular group, who grew up during a difficult childhood, were allowed to enjoy a trip to the beach but were killed on the way home in an accident started by car hydroplaning.

“I lost my mother in a car accident when I was 10,” said Jamison’s mother, Erin. “When you know that this is her age, it’s so difficult to explain that everything can be gone at such a moment. Explaining to my daughter that no one could say goodbye, it was just a total tragedy. It meant a lot to me that the girls wanted to help people who were hurt by what I went through in such a situation. “

Maggie and Jamison also took it to heart. None of them complained or asked their parents for help on the way.

While other friends were playing in the pool right next to them, the two girls never asked to leave the lemonade stand to go for a swim. Instead, they stayed true to the cause.

A special occasion

During the heat of the day, Maggie and Jamison hand squeezed over 50 lemons, mixed them with water, sugar, and ice, and served nearly 70 cups a day.

“It’s hard for our two children, who have both parents and are so blessed that it’s hard to convey the value of their property to them without seeing what others don’t,” said Erin. “It doesn’t make materialistic stuff seem that important. They knew where this money was going and never asked for our help.

It meant a lot to parents to see that our children had an idea that they knew their only benefit would be to help others. They never complained or asked once to go or do anything else. You rarely see that, especially with 8-year-olds. “

The hard work paid off as the girls raised a total of $ 2,800 through soda sales and donations over two days.

“When we heard about the tragedy, we just wanted to help, but we didn’t expect it,” said Jamison.

Maggie said she was afraid no one would show up and she wasn’t expecting more than 20 customers.

“The number just got higher,” she says. “I was shocked. It was so much fun.”

Not only will the money be brought to Girls Ranch by the girls and their families, but they will also raise more money later this week on Calera’s First Friday and hope to do the same for other charities soon.

“When kids go to Walmart or Target they say, ‘What can I get, what can I get?’ But none of us really remember those $ 5 toys, ”said Erin. “However, we remember experiences in life, we remember what we do for others and what they do for us.”

And this experience is one that both Maggie and Jamison said they will never forget while hoping this is just the beginning of helping others.

Parents were also grateful to the Calera Ward for their assistance in helping Tallapoosa County Girls Ranch through a tragic time.

What started with a daughter yelling an idea at her father during a phone call grew into a powerful business helping a group of people when they needed it most.

“We just want them to know we love them and know it’s hard, but we want to help them know that we are here to help them,” Maggie said.

Outdated City Reside sees profitable kickoff for leisure district – Shelby County Reporter

By NATHAN HOWELL | Employed author

HELENA– Just a week after the area around the Helena Amphitheater was badly damaged, hundreds of locals and visitors came out on April 3rd to celebrate the city’s new entertainment district in Old Town Live.

After a clean-up last weekend, the area was made suitable for guests who had come into effect to reaffirm the “Helena Strong” motto that was emblazoned on T-shirts sold at the event after the storms had become effective.

The free event was designed by HOTboard, the development and advertising board of Old Town Helena, to connect people to the wide range of amenities that the many businesses in the new entertainment district can offer.

After the area was named an entertainment district in 2020, residents can now stroll through the many shops and park around the amphitheater and enjoy alcoholic beverages from restaurants and bars in the old town.

According to Laura Joseph, member of Helena City Council and HOTboard liaison, the event was very successful. She said there were around 200 people in the area at any one time.

“It was great. We stabilized all day and we loved it because there were so many other events going on that day. So we were really excited about your business,” said Joseph To be able to pull off something like this week after the storms, and we were very grateful for everyone who made it possible. “

All day long, guests can always bring their families, refrigerators and garden chairs to the park and enjoy the music in the amphitheater or take a stroll through the many shops that line the district’s street.

In the heart of the new district is Oversoul Brewing, which created a special drink for the occasion, Helena Strong Season, which many guests seemed to be enjoying.

There were three musical acts entertaining during the course of the event, including The Pine Hill Haints, Drayton Farley, and Deadwood.

Another treat of the event was the freshly cooked lobster that featured on the plates of many of the event’s guests, cooked by the Bywater Oyster Bar & Grill.

Other restaurants that attended the event included Refined To-Go and Beef O’Brady’s.

There were also several local stores with specials and gifts for guests, including Skull Girl Soaps, the Oh My Soul clothing boutique, Buck Creek Stained Glass, the florist and gifts The Petal Cart, and more.

From Joseph’s point of view, the event achieved the goal set by the HOTboard. That should get people out and enjoy the weather, the district and other people.

“It was great,” she said. “There were kids dancing and playing and families laughing and having a good time. It was really great to see Helena families pull back and do what they were supposed to be doing at this time of year. “

Joseph said the HOTboard had been working hard to decide what to do next and will host more events in the near future.

Roman-style pizzeria, ice cream store to open in Shelby Park

A new pizza place and ice cream parlor are in the works on the corner of Oak and Shelby Streets. The two new concepts – Square Cut Pizza and Sugar Room – come from Emil and Liz David, the owners of the Hot Buns Food Truck in Louisville. They are expected to open in the former Scarlet’s Bakery at 741 E. Oak St. early this summer. Chef Emil David told me that he and his wife visited Louisville for a wedding for the first time in 2016. At the time he was working as a chef at one of Bobby Flay’s restaurants, but he quickly fell in love with the bluegrass state. He told his wife that they would be back one day, and the couple finally moved here in 2019, David said he immediately set off to open his own restaurant concept in Louisville. But then the real estate market was too hot and he couldn’t find the right property. While they were searching, the Davids launched the Hot Buns Food Truck, a Bao-Bun-centered concept that was relatively new to the area, so they could keep exploring various communities in Louisville. The food truck business has had quick wins since its first year in Louisville and Lexington, Kentucky, David said. More than a year (and a pandemic) later, the two said they found the right place to make a permanent footprint in Shelby Park’s Square Cut Pizza, which is in the 4,500-square-foot former bakery, is owned by the place influenced where David cut his teeth in the culinary world: Italy. Roman style pizza is cut into squares (hence the name) and is a different type of thin crust compared to Neapolitan pizza. David explained that it is crispy on the top and bottom, and has an airy center. The pizzeria will also have a salumeria, which means it will also function as an Italian charcuterie shop. David said there will be an open plan kitchen, bar and outdoor dining area for 40 to 50 people with an additional 8 to 10 seats outside. In the meantime, the Sugar Room will be located in a former garage / storage room on the same property. Click here to learn more about Louisville Business First’s new businesses.

A new pizza place and ice cream parlor are in the works on the corner of Oak and Shelby Streets.

The two new concepts – Square Cut Pizza and Sugar Room – come from Emil and Liz David, the owners of the Hot Buns Food Truck in Louisville. They are expected to open in the former Scarlet’s Bakery at 741 E. Oak St. early this summer.

Chef Emil David told me that he and his wife were visiting Louisville for a wedding for the first time in 2016. At the time, he was working as a chef at one of Bobby Flay’s restaurants, but quickly fell in love with the bluegrass state.

He told his wife that they would be back one day, and the couple finally moved here in 2019.

With an extensive background in the restaurant industry, David said he immediately set about opening his own stationary restaurant concept in Louisville. But then the real estate market was too hot and he couldn’t find the right property.

During the search, the Davids launched the Hot Buns Food Truck, a Bao-Bun-centered concept that was relatively new to the area, so they could keep exploring various communities in Louisville. The food truck business has had quick wins since its first year in Louisville and Lexington, Kentucky, David said.

More than a year (and a pandemic) later, the couple say they found the right place to create a permanent footprint in Shelby Park.

Located in the 4,500-square-foot former bakery, Square Cut Pizza is influenced by the place where David cut his teeth in the culinary world: Italy.

Roman style pizza is cut into squares (hence the name) and is a different type of thin crust than Neapolitan pizza. David explained that it is crispy on top and bottom with an airy center.

The pizzeria will also host a salumeria, which means it will also function as an Italian charcuterie shop. David said there will be an open plan kitchen, bar and outdoor seating area for 40 to 50 people with an additional 8 to 10 seats outdoors.

In the meantime, Sugar Room will be located in a former garage / storage area on the same property.

Click here to learn more about the new Louisville Business First companies.