San Diego Man Sentenced for Killing Spouse in Execution-Fashion Taking pictures – NBC 7 San Diego

A man accused of killing the mother of his two children on the day she was about to deliver divorce papers to him learned of his fate in court on Monday.

Julia Maria Serrano Avila, 29, was murdered in a shooting in December 2019. Her husband, 28-year-old Fernando Avila, was arrested as the sole suspect.

Avila later pleaded guilty to first degree murder charges and firearm charges on the case.

On Monday, Avila was sentenced to 35 years in prison by a district judge in San Diego.

During the verdict on Monday, Avila apologized to Julia’s family “for having suffered so much pain” and her children “for taking their mother away from them.”

Julia Avila was shot dead on the street outside a pawn shop in City Heights, the prosecutor said, just blocks from the house where she lived with the couple’s two children.

The victim’s father described her alleged killer as lazy and not good. NBC 7’s Jackie Crea has the story.

San Diego police said at least three people watched the shooting. Violeta Marquez, who lives next to the family, told NBC 7 the first time she heard screams and called 911. Then she saw Avila fire two shots at his wife

“She was sitting on the sidewalk and I don’t know what he told her,” said Marquez. “And just like seconds he shot her again.”

Avila stayed and held her before running away on foot, Marquez said.

Witnesses said the couple quarreled prior to the shooting, which took place just blocks from Rosa Parks Elementary School and the neighborhood’s city center.

Sgt. Michelle Velovich said the argument started at her home and spread to the street and eventually outside the pawn shop, which is unrelated to the suspect or the victim.

The national domestic violence hotline is 1-800-799-7233. NBC 7’s Catherine Garcia sits down with District Attorney Summer Stephan to discuss domestic violence resources available to victims.

It was not clear how many, if any, of the shots the children witnessed, but they were in the house at the time. The children, identified by neighbors as between 8 and 12 years old, were brought to live with family members, SDPD said.

NBC 7 learned that Julia filed for divorce in November 2019. She intended to serve Avila with these papers, her father Pablo Serrano told NBC 7.

Wausau medical health insurance dealer sentenced to federal jail in drug, cash laundering scheme

From Shereen Siewert

A Wausauer health insurance broker who ran a program to import and distribute fake brand medicines from India will spend six months in jail after pleading guilty of postal fraud and money laundering, federal officials said Friday.

Kenneth Zipperer, 54, was also fined $ 150,000 and $ 483 in restitution costs.

In January 2019, At least five agents were seen pulling boxes from the Zipperer Financial, Wausau Forststr. 115 carried and placed in vehicles. The agents wore jackets that identified them as IRS-CID officers.

Zipperer Financial offered complementary Medicare plans, benefit plans, and Part D pharma plans.

Investigators refused to comment on the investigation for more than 18 months. But in November 2020, federal officials announced that Zipperer had been charged with 26 federal charges stemming from a plan with an unlicensed pharmacy. Zipper initially faced five postal fraud cases, ten wire transfer fraud cases, two cases of distributing bogus prescription drugs without a written prescription or license to administer such drugs, five cases of covert money laundering, and four cases of advertising money laundering.

According to the indictment, Zipperer imported overseas prescription drugs via the U.S. Mail and Express Mail Service from an Internet pharmacy company in India, and none of the drugs have been approved by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration for human consumption in the U.S. Attorney’s Office Zipperer was not licensed to dispense or prescribe prescription drugs, and that he used his staff, computers, and office space to order prescription drugs from India, break down bulk shipments into quantities for individual customers, store drug inventory, and issue invoices for payment, and deposit drug customers’ checks into the company’s commercial bank account, officials said.

Zipperer urged his prescription drug customers to pay him cash to avoid leaving a paper trail of financial transactions related to the operations of his underground pharmacy and for him to conduct financial transactions knowing that it was revenue engaged in illegal activities, prosecutors said. Usually he personally distributed the drugs to insurance customers, mostly in his office in downtown Wausau.

On Friday, Zipperer was convicted of postal fraud and once money laundering, said Timothy M. O’Shea, acting US attorney for the Western District of Wisconsin. US District Judge William M. Conley directed the case.

O’Shea said distributing unapproved prescription drugs is not only illegal, but also endangers consumer health.

“To protect public health and safety, our office works closely with our law enforcement partners to identify and prosecute those who seek profit from the sale of unapproved prescription drugs,” said O’Shea.

Federal officials warn against taking foreign unapproved prescription drugs that can put patients at serious risk. Unapproved drugs have no guarantees of safety or effectiveness and can harm those who use them, said special envoy Lynda M. Burdelik, FDA Office of Criminal Investigations Chicago Field Office.

“We will continue to investigate those who endanger public health,” said Burdelik.

The charges against Zipperer were the result of an investigation by the US Postal Inspection Service, the US Food & Drug Administration – Office of Criminal Investigations, the IRS Criminal Investigation, and the US Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s Homeland Security Investigations. Deputy US Attorney Daniel Graber took the indictment.

Pa. couple sentenced to jail for giving kinfolk cash to affix ISIS

A Montgomery County couple convicted last year of conspiracy to provide material support and resources to ISIS were sentenced to jail Thursday.

Shahidul Gaffar, 40, and Nabila Khan, 35, both from Collegeville, were sentenced to 18 months and two years in prison, respectively, by the US District Court. The judge also sentenced her to three years of supervised release.

Each of them faced the maximum possible prison sentence of five years, a fine of $ 250,000, and three years of supervised release.

Prosecutors said they had provided financial and moral support to Khan’s two brothers in their efforts to travel to Syria to join the designated foreign terrorist organization as fighters. Court documents against her were unsealed late last year after pleading guilty.

The couple alleged in court on Thursday that they did it out of love for the family and not for ISIS. after the Philadelphia Inquirer. Gaffar is a US naturalized citizen and Khan is a permanent resident.

Court records gave this account:

Gaffar and Khan, both originally from Bangladesh, discussed in detail the brothers’ travel plans among themselves as well as with the brothers and other family members in September 2014. In January 2015, Khan asked her sister, who lived in Bangladesh, to sell some of Khan’s gold and gave the money to her eldest brother, JK, to help him with his trip to Syria.

Khan then flew to Bangladesh to bid farewell to JK before leaving in February 2015. Gaffar, who stayed in Pennsylvania, sent Khan’s mother messages of support: “Be [p]raw mother for the noble cause and for Allah’s sake !!! “

Khan’s second brother, IK, had come to the United States on a student visa and lived with the couple in Pennsylvania from June 2014 to February 2015 when he returned to Bangladesh.

For the next several months, Khan, who was still in Bangladesh, watched IK watch terrorist propaganda videos starring Anwar al-Awlaki, a declared global terrorist who is now dead.

Around the same time, Gaffar began sending international money transfers to IK in Bangladesh. This money served several purposes, but one was to support IK’s trip to Syria to join IS.

In June 2015, Gaffar Khan sent a message saying, “Let’s [I.K.] know that I will make it and send $ 3000 if Allah wills. Let us help him, my dear, for the good cause, who knows that this might be enough to receive and accept forgiveness from Allah[ance] [in]to the sky.”

In July 2015, Gaffar continued to communicate with Kahn about the conspiracy, sometimes saying: “I feel sorry for mom and dad, but at the same time I’m very proud. [W]Has a happy mom and dad. “

At the beginning of July 2015, IK traveled to Syria to join IS. The next day, Gaffar and Khan discussed electronic messages about how Khan had tried to give IK more money just before leaving

Gaffar sent reassuring messages to Khan saying it was “cool” that she could watch the radical Islamist “changes” in IK from “start to finish.”

IK eventually changed his online profile picture on social media to one that shows himself, his brother and another man sitting with firearms on a table in front of them in front of the black ISIS flag and openly showing himself and his brother as members identified by ISIS. according to court records. IK was finally killed in the fighting in Syria in March 2019.

“Money and labor are the lifeblood of terrorist groups like ISIS,” said Bradley S. Benavides, acting special agent for the FBI’s Philadelphia Division. “Gaffar and Khan enjoyed all of the rights and privileges of living in America, but they have conspired to support violent extremists who regard our country as their sworn enemy.”

CONTINUE READING:

The Middletown man had materials to make explosives in his illegal and ailing home laboratory, investigators say

Effingham Man Sentenced to 58 Months in Jail for Manufacturing Counterfeit Cash | USAO-SDIL

A man from Effingham was sentenced yesterday to four years and 10 months in prison and a fine of $ 1,000 for making counterfeit money.

According to court documents, counterfeit banknotes made by Jared Sapp, 29, have been seized in Madison, St. Clair and Effingham counties and as far as Colorado. The forgery of Sapp goes back at least to the year 2016. A number of companies in Effingham, Illinois reported being paid counterfeit money in 2017 and 2018, which was later traced back to Sapp. Sapp would also use counterfeit money to pay for used goods on websites or applications such as letgo.com and craigslist.com. In total, law enforcement agencies recovered at least 201 counterfeit banknotes made by Sapp with a total face value of $ 4,715.00. The operation ended when Sapp was arrested in April 2020 with two printers / scanners and a stack of counterfeit $ 20 in the trunk of his car.

The investigations were conducted by the US Intelligence Service, the Effingham City Police Department, the Granite City Police Department and the Caseyville Police Department.

U.S. Assistant Attorney Peter Reed is pursuing the case.

Worldwide cash launderer sentenced to federal jail in cyber-crime conspiracies accountable for meant lack of almost $60 million | USAO-SDGA

SAVANNAH, GA: A Canadian man who conspired to launder the tens of millions of dollars stolen from various wire transfer and bank fraud programs – including a massive online banking theft by North Korean cyber criminals – has been sentenced to nearly 12 years in federal prison.

Ghaleb Alaumary, 36, of Mississauga, Ontario, was sentenced to a total of 140 months in prison after pleading guilty to two counts of money laundering conspiracies, said David H. Estes, acting U.S. attorney for the southern district of Georgia . District Court Judge R. Stan Baker also ordered Alaumary to pay $ 30,703,946.56 in compensation to the victims and to be released under custody after completing his three-year sentence. There is no parole in the federal system.

“This defendant served as an integral channel in a network of cyber criminals who siphoned tens of millions of dollars from multiple companies and institutions around the world,” said acting US Attorney Estes. “He laundered money for a rogue nation and some of the world’s worst cybercriminals, and led a team of co-conspirators who helped fill thieves’ pockets and digital wallets. But US law enforcement agencies, in collaboration with their partners around the world, will bring fraudsters to justice who believe they can hide behind a computer screen. “

As described in unsealed court documents and trials, Alaumary and his co-conspirators used business compromise email programs, ATM withdrawals, and bank cyber-robberies to steal money from victims and then launder the money through bank accounts and digital currencies. He previously pleaded guilty to two money laundering cases in the southern Georgia district.

In the first case, filed and investigated in the southern district of Georgia, Alaumary conspired with others who sent fraudulent “fake” emails to a university in Canada in 2017 to create the appearance that the emails came from a university Construction company came out paying for a large construction project. The university, believed to be paying the construction company, transferred CAD 11.8 million (about $ 9.4 million) to a bank account controlled by Alaumary and his co-conspirators. Alaumary then arranged with individuals in the US and elsewhere to launder the stolen funds through various financial institutions.

Weeks later, Alaumary arranged several trips to Texas for a co-conspirator in the United States to impersonate wealthy bank customers in order to steal hundreds of thousands of dollars from victims ‘accounts using the victims’ stolen personally identifiable information. There was a phone call to a co-conspirator in Savannah discussing the fraud.

In the second case, relocated from the Central District of California to the Southern District of Georgia for his admission of guilt and conviction, Alaumary recruited and organized individuals to withdraw stolen cash from ATMs; provided bank accounts that received funds from bank cyber-robberies and fraud systems; and once the ill-gotten funds were in accounts he controlled, Alaumary further laundered the funds through wire transfers, cash withdrawals, and by exchanging the funds for cryptocurrency. Funds included a cyber attack on a Maltese bank in 2019 by North Korea. Other victims of Alaumary’s crimes have included banks headquartered in India, Pakistan and Malta, as well as corporations in the US and UK, individuals in the US and a professional football club in the UK

“International money launderers provide critical services to cyber criminals, helping hackers and scammers avoid their illegal profits and hide their illegal profits,” said Assistant Attorney General Kenneth A. Polite Jr. of the Department of Justice’s Department of Criminal Investigation. “Businesses large and small, a university, banks and others lost tens of millions of dollars on this plan. Alaumary’s verdict today reflects how seriously the Justice Department takes the critical role money launderers play in global cybercrime. “

“The conviction of the defendant in this case speaks to the value of cross-border investigative cooperation,” said Steven R. Baisel, SAIC Field Office of US Intelligence Atlanta. “Despite the complex, international nature of this criminal enterprise, the accused and his co-conspirators were brought to justice.”

“This case exemplifies our relentless determination to hold criminals accountable, no matter how sophisticated their crimes may seem,” said Phil Wislar, acting special agent for the FBI Atlanta. “The arrest and conviction of cybercriminals like Alaumary, who feel safe behind a computer screen, is only possible through persistent investigative efforts by the FBI and our close cooperation with our US and international partners.”

Alaumary is the fourth defendant in the investigation to be convicted in the southern district of Georgia. Uchechi Ohanaka, Kelvin Desangles and Jennal Aziz had previously pleaded guilty to fraud in federal court and were sentenced to more than 200 months in prison.

The cases were investigated by the U.S. Intelligence Savannah Resident Office, with assistance from the Los Angeles Field Office and Global Investigative Operations Center, the FBI and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and followed up by the Criminal Investigation Department of the U.S. District Attorney’s Southern District of Georgia, Senior Trial Attorney Mona Sedky, of the US Department of Justice’s cybercrime and intellectual property division, and Assistant US Attorney Khaldoun Shobaki, of the US Attorney’s Office for the Central District of California.

Hogansburg Man Sentenced for Conspiracy to Distribute Marijuana and Cash Laundering | USAO-NDNY

SYRACUSE, NEW YORK – Joshua Francis, 32 years old, a Hogansburg, NY resident, was sentenced to 60 months in prison today for conspiracy to distribute marijuana and drug money laundering, said Acting U.S. Attorney Antoinette T. Bacon, Kevin. with Kelly, Special Representative for the Buffalo Field Office of Homeland Security Investigations (HSI); and Gregory S. Oakes, District Attorney for Oswego.

As part of his earlier admission of guilt, Francis admitted that he had smuggled large quantities of marijuana from Canada into the United States by boat via the Akwesasne Mohawk Reservation in New York State between January 2017 and August 2017. Francis also admitted that he had directed couriers in the United States to deliver marijuana to redistributors in the Syracuse area and elsewhere, and also to collect the proceeds from marijuana sales. Francis distributed at least 317 kilograms of marijuana.

In addition to his prison sentence, the court also sentenced Francis to four years’ supervised release and sentenced him to pay a fine of $ 501,850, the equivalent of proceeds from distributing marijuana.

This case was investigated by Homeland Security Investigations (HSI), the US Internal Revenue Service-Criminal Investigation (IRS-CI), the Syracuse Police Department, and the Oswego County Drug Task Force, made up of special agents from HSI, members of the City Oswego Police Department, Oswego County Sheriff’s Office, Oswego County District Attorney’s Office investigators, SUNY Oswego Police Department, and US Border Patrol agents. The case was being prosecuted by US Assistant Attorney Thomas Sutcliffe.

Trump foe Michael Avenatti sentenced in Nike extortion case

Attorney Michael Avenatti arrives at the U.S. courthouse in the Manhattan neighborhood of New York City (SDNY) in New York, United States, on July 8, 2021 for his hearing on his conviction in an extortion program against Nike.

Brendan McDermid | Reuters

Michael Avenatti, the cheeky lawyer who had been a major enemy of the then president Donald TrumpHe was sentenced Thursday to 30 months in prison for a brazen, botched plan to blackmail the sportswear giant Nike of up to $ 25 million.

That sentence was much less than the nine years, which was the lowest of the sentences proposed by federal guidelines, and nowhere near a “substantial” jail sentence being sought by federal attorneys for the California attorney.

“I alone have ruined my career, my relationships and my life. And there is no doubt that I will have to pay,” said Avenatti, 50, Manhattan Federal Court Justice Paul Gardephe tearfully before he was convicted.

“I am really sorry for all the pain I have inflicted on Mr. Franklin and others,” said Avenatti, referring to his former client, Gary Franklin, an amateur basketball coach.

Avenatti’s conviction came more than three years after he gained widespread fame and disgrace. for his bombastic portrayal of pornstar Stormy Daniels, who received a hush payment of $ 130,000 from Trump’s attorney at the time, Michael Cohen, ahead of the 2016 presidential election in order to keep silent about claims that she had sex with Trump years before he ran for the White House.

Daniels is one of several former Avenatti clients he is charged with on two other separate federal fraud charges, one of which is scheduled to begin in California next week.

Gardephe said Mr Avenatti’s behavior in the Nike program was outrageous.

“He kidnapped his client’s claims and used them to advance his own agenda of extorting millions of dollars from Nike for himself,” said the judge, who also sentenced Avenatti to three years of supervised release in the event that Avenatti was killed Sentenced in court last year.

“He really betrayed his client,” said Gardephe.

Franklin had hired Avenatti to reform Nike, which Franklin had claimed was corrupting amateur players and their families

Avenatti then used this request in early 2019 to not only demand a settlement with Franklin, but also a more lucrative advisory agreement from Nike for him and senior attorney Mark Geragos to avoid a press conference at which he would make Franklin’s allegations.

Avenatti warned Nike’s attorney that the allegations “could reduce your client’s market capitalization by $ 10 billion”.

“I don’t play around with it and I don’t play any more,” Avenatti told Nike lawyers shortly before his arrest.

Attorney Michael Avenatti is leaving the court after being convicted of an extortion program against Nike Inc. on July 8, 2021 at the U.S. Courthouse in New York City.

Brendan McDermid | Reuters

Gardephe noticed this language during Thursday’s hearing in which he said, “Mr. Avenatti was drunk from the power of his platform or how he perceived the power of his platform.”

But Gardephe added that Avenatti deserved a lighter sentence than the range recommended by federal guidelines – from nine years to 11 years and three months – because the judge said for the first time in the case: “Mr. Avenatti has expressed what I believe to be heavy regrets today. “

The judge also cited the brutal conditions under which Avenatti was held in a federal prison in Manhattan for several months after his arrest in 2019.

And Gardephe, in substantiating the lower-than-recommended verdict, pointed out that federal prosecutors did not prosecute Geragos even though they claimed he was actively involved in the shakedown with Avenatti.

The judge ordered that Avenatti, who remains in custody, must surrender on September 15 to begin his sentence, which Gardephe recommended to serve at the Sheridan, Oregon federal prison camp.

Avenatti’s lawyers had asked for a prison sentence of just six months.

During his statement to Gardephe, Avenatti noted that as a child, while other children dreamed of becoming professional athletes, said, “I dreamed of becoming a lawyer. Of becoming a trial lawyer.”

“About doing good and seeking and achieving justice.”

“I did just that for years, but then I got lost. I gave away my own values, my friends, my family and myself,” he said.

“I gave away my job. I was driven by the things that don’t matter in life. For the past two years, Your Honor, I’ve been thinking why this had to happen,” said Avenatti, who admitted he would never work as a lawyer again.

“I’ve learned that all the fame, the money motorism in the world is meaningless,” said Avenatti.

Avenatti collapsed and took a few moments to calm himself down as he discussed the effects of his behavior on his three children.

He said that most people want their children to be proud of their fathers, but in the case of his own three children, “I want them to be ashamed of him”.

“Because if you’re ashamed, it means your moral compass is exactly what it should be,” he said.

Avenatti will face indictment at his trial next week Crimes that involve defrauding customers for millions of dollars. One of these clients was a mentally ill paraplegic.

Avenatti will face charges of alleged fraud against Daniels in Manhattan federal court next year $ 300,000 in proceeds for a book she wrote.

As in the Nike case, Avenatti pleaded not guilty in the other two cases.

During Thursday’s conviction, U.S. Assistant Attorney Matthew Podolsky told Gardephe that Avenatti had a “profound lack of remorse” for his behavior.

“It’s about taking advantage of people and abusing power and trust,” said Podolsky.

“He saw Mr. Franklin as a way to get rich, to make Mr. Avenatti rich.”

But Avenatti’s attorney Perry pleaded forbearance, saying, “He had an epic fall, he was publicly shamed.”

Perry said that while Avenatti pursued and then achieved a legal career, “really wanted to be the David fighting the Goliath”.

But she remarked, “He’s certainly lost and he knows it.”

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“I can tell you … he’s a completely humble man who got beaten up by himself,” said Perry.

Perry also advocated a shorter term because Avenatti and Geragos were treated differently.

“It is impossible to distinguish between the conduct of Mr. Avenatti … and that of Mark Geragos, whom they did not charge at all,” said lawyer Danya Perry.

“The Nike lawyers, on the other hand, believed Mr Geragos was a full participant and felt as threatened and blackmailed by him as they were by Mr Avenatti.”

The contrast between the tearful Avenatti on Thursday and the sharp-tongued, Twitter-obsessed lawyer he was in 2018 was dramatic.

Avenatti has been beating Trump and Trump’s former personal attorney Michael Cohen for months this year after it was revealed that Cohen paid Daniels the hush money so as not to affect Trump’s chances of winning the White House. Trump denies having sex with Daniels.

After the hush money program was exposed, Avenatti has been an almost constant presence on cable television news attacking Trump and Cohen.

Avenatti’s notoriety and popularity with some of Trump’s opponents grew so high that at one point he flirted with running for the Democratic presidential run in 2020.

But the attorney’s commercial flash came as he staggered under millions in debt, a burden prosecutors alleged had committed the series of serious crimes he was charged with in early 2019.

Cohen, who spent more than a year in jail for crimes that included a campaign funding violation related to the payout of Daniels, said in a Twitter post that he heard Avenatti’s conviction over a phone line issued as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic has been set up.

“Despite my disdain for Avenatti for all the lies he said about me, I was glad the 108-135 month guideline was drastically reduced by a measured and logical judge,” Cohen tweeted. “Job well done by @Edanyaperry“He added, using the Twitter handle from Perry, Avenatti’s attorney.

Cape Coral legal professional’s assistant who spent aged consumer’s cash sentenced to 16 months

LEE COUNTY

A Cape Coral woman is spending 16 months in jail for misusing the credit card of someone who trusted her to pay her expenses.

Kristin Nicole Jordan, 40, was convicted Tuesday of exploiting an elderly person. The family of the victim, who died in May, was compensated.

The case dates back to 2019 when investigators from the Lee County Sheriff’s Office learned that the victim’s credit card was used in fraudulent charges for $ 42,276.

The eight-month investigation led to Jordan using the card to make purchases through 2017. She was employed as an assistant to a fiduciary attorney at the Musial law firm, which, according to its website, handles health care and long-term planning. for the elderly.

Records show Jordan bought numerous different things, including paying Comcast bills, buying groceries, shopping at Amazon, Victoria’s Secret, Nike, and several other retail stores.

Investigators said the victim found out that Jordan used her money to pay for all of that, including dinner, car payments, travel, cell phone bills, and school payments. The victim reported that she believed numerous transactions from her bank account were fraudulent.

Investigators said the victim eventually became suspicious of Jordan himself. WINK News spoke to Jordan shortly after her arrest, and she denied the charges, saying it was not true.

The law firm told investigators that they fired Jordan in May 2019.

Hawaii man sentenced to greater than 24 years for drug trafficking, cash laundering conspiracies

HONOLULU (KHON2) – Justin Wilcox, 39, from Kailua, Hawaii, was sentenced to more than 24 years in prison on Thursday June 17 for his role in conspiracies to distribute methamphetamine and cocaine and to commit money laundering had played.

Wilcox was sentenced to simultaneous prison terms of 295 months – 24.58 years – and 240 months – 20 years – and was also given five and three years of post-imprisonment supervised releases, both of which are to be served.

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Acting US attorney Judith Phillips said, according to court and court documents, “Wilcox was the leader and organizer of the Oahu drug conspiracy that operated in Hawaii and involved more than five members with drugs from a Las Vegas, Nevada source.”

Wilcox was held responsible by the judgment court for the possession and distribution of 3,880 grams of pure methamphetamine and 1,393 grams of cocaine.

Honolulu man charged with drug trafficking, firearms charge

According to the Hawaii District Attorney’s Office, “the court found that Wilcox used its Kailua clothing company, Armed and Dangerous, as a covert business to unload cash from drugs.” Wilcox was asked to pay $ 127,000 to confiscate funds he received through drug trafficking.

Federal police officers confiscated 8.4 kilograms (18.52 pounds) of methamphetamine, 1.39 kilograms (3.06 pounds) of cocaine, $ 160,000 in cash, two firearms and ammunition during their investigation against Wilcox.

Fentanyl from Mexican cartels coming to Hawaii as overdoses rise

Wilcox pleaded guilty to conspiracy in 2019 to distribute and possess 50 grams or more of methamphetamine and 500 grams or more of cocaine, as well as conspiracy to commit money laundering, according to the Hawaii District Attorney.

Eight people have been convicted of participating in the drug conspiracy, and officials say a ninth man has also been convicted of drug offenses. All nine people received sentences of 41 months or more and five of them, including Wilcox, received sentences of more than 10 years.

The Drug Enforcement Agency and the Internal Revenue Service – Criminal Investigations Division were involved in the investigation, and US assistant attorneys Mark Inciong and Michael Albanese are pursuing the case.

Former bookkeeper sentenced for embezzling cash from 2 separate WNY firms

Sarah Smith, 37, was sentenced to three to six years in state prison on Monday.

BUFFALO, NY – A former accountant from Tonawanda City was sentenced Monday morning to three to six years in state prison for two separate embezzlement cases.

According to the Erie County District Attorney’s Office, Sarah Smith, 37, admitted stealing around $ 136,000 while working as an accountant for a company in the city of Tonawanda.

According to prosecutors, an audit was conducted when the company saw an invoice entered twice. Smith was found to have made a series of payments to her personal bank account between August 21, 2018 and April 4, 2019.

Smith pleaded guilty to the highest sustained indictment back in March. She pleaded guilty to a grievous second degree theft, a Class C crime.

Prosecutors say Smith stole the money while awaiting conviction on a separate case.

Smith also pleaded guilty to stealing $ 87,019.84 while serving as a secretary and accountant for a Hamburg City company. The money was stolen between July 1, 2017 and August 31, 2018.

Smith pleaded guilty to a grievous second degree theft which is the highest standing charge.

It was also discovered that Smith used some of the stolen funds from the city of Tonawanda to repay the victims in Hamburg.

According to prosecutors, Smith will have to pay a total of $ 47,590 in reparation to both victims after serving their sentences.