Savvy Senior: Little Recognized Social Safety Program Helps Seniors Handle Their Cash

Dear accomplished senior,
Does social security offer specific help to beneficiaries who have difficulty managing their benefits? My aunt, who has no children, has dementia and struggles with her bills and other financial obligations.
Inquiring niece

Dear inquiries,

Yes, Social Security actually has a little-known program known as the Representative Payee Program that helps beneficiaries who need help with managing their Social Security benefits. Here’s what you should know.

Representative payee program

The Social Security Funds Payee Program, approved by Congress back in 1939, provides money management assistance to beneficiaries unable to manage their Social Security income. Beneficiaries who need this help are often seniors with dementia or underage children who receive survivor benefits from social security.

Currently, more than five million social security beneficiaries have representative payees.

Representative payees also provide benefits for nearly three million recipients of Supplemental Security Income (SSI), a social security-administered benefit program for low-income people who are over 65 years of age, blind, or disabled.

Who are the payees?

A representative payee is usually a relative or close friend of the beneficiary who needs help, but Social Security can also designate an organization or institution for the role, such as a nursing home or social services agency.

The duties of a representative payee include:

  • Using the beneficiary’s Social Security or SSI payments to meet their basic needs such as food, shelter, household bills, and medical care. The money can also be used for personal needs such as clothing and recreation.
  • Retention of remaining funds from benefit payments on an interest-bearing bank account or savings bonds for future needs of the beneficiary.
  • Records of benefit payments received and how the money was spent or saved.
  • Report to Social Security any changes or events that could affect the beneficiary’s payments (e.g. move, marriage, divorce, or death).
  • Report circumstances that affect the payee’s ability to assume the role.

As a representative payee, you cannot combine the beneficiary’s social security contributions with your own money or use them for your own needs. The bank account into which the benefits are paid should be wholly owned by the beneficiary, with the payee listed as the financial agent.

Some payees, usually those who do not live with the beneficiary, are required to submit annual reports to Social Security on the use of the benefits. For more information about the responsibilities and limitations associated with the role, see the social security publication “A Guide for Representative Payees” at SSA.gov/pubs/EN-05-10076.pdf.

How to get help

If you think your aunt may need a representative payee, call Social Security at (800) 772-1213 and make an appointment to discuss the matter at her local office. Applying as a payee usually requires a personal interview.

Social security may consider other evidence, including medical assessments and statements from relatives, friends, and others who have an informed view of the beneficiary’s situation, in deciding whether a beneficiary needs a payee and selecting who to play the role can submit.

You should also know that if you become your aunt’s deputy payee, you will not be able to charge a fee for it. However, some organizations that serve in this role receive fees paid from the beneficiary’s Social Security or SSI payments.

More information about the program can be found at SSA.gov/payee.

Send your senior questions to: Experienced senior, PO Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070, or visit SavvySenior.org. Jim Miller is a contributor on the NBC Today Show and author of The Savvy Senior.

Islesboro teenagers spent years elevating cash for his or her senior journey. As a substitute, they used the cash to vaccinate the island.

ISLESBORO, Maine – For the students at Islesboro Central School, the class trip is a really big deal.

Teenagers who go to school on the tiny island of Maine have visited places as exotic as Iceland, Norway and Panama in recent years. The school trip is something that students dream of and work towards for years by running fundraising drives.

“It definitely means a lot to all students,” said Olivia Britton, 17, a Belfast graduate, this week.

But the coronavirus pandemic has shaken travel and fundraising plans for both classes in 2020 and 2021. So instead of packing their bags, the 13 high school graduates did something special this spring.

They decided to donate much of the money they raised before the pandemic – a total of $ 5,000 – to the Islesboro Community Fund, which will use it to set up vaccine clinics on the island and help islanders in need.

The student donation helped pay for the administrative aspects of running the vaccine clinics, including purchasing personal protective equipment, transportation costs, and paying overtime for workers. The efforts have paid off. Islesboro has a 99% vaccination rate for COVID-19, according to the Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention.

“I think the engagement of the Islesboro seniors is heartwarming,” said Owen Howell, medical assistant at Islesboro Health Center, who ran the clinics. “I think it’s selfless from them. You show wonderful leadership qualities in times of COVID. I know they would have loved to go on their journey. But they make the most of it and do something important with all the sweat it has cost. ”

The teens said they wanted to share their money with the community because it was the community that helped them raise it in the first place. They bought the concessions that high school seniors sold at home games and bought tickets to the spaghetti and Thanksgiving dinners they hosted.

“The island has supported us all along,” said Britton. “They came to all of our dinners and were very nice and busy with us. They didn’t mind if we screwed it up. ”

Liefe Temple, 18, of Lincolnville, another graduate, said it didn’t feel right for students to try other ideas.

“When it became clear we couldn’t use the money on a school trip, it felt really weird to use the money on something else or keep it for ourselves,” she said. “That’s not what the community gave us for.”

So they gave a lot of it back.

Your generosity meant a lot to the islanders, not only for what the money did, but also for the impetus behind the donation.

The 70-year-old Islesboro Community Fund helps residents in need who may have difficulty paying medical, fuel, or utility bills. It also supports a scholarship program to help young Islesboro teenagers meet expenses for higher education or post-secondary education.

“We had a running list of organizations,” said Temple. “We thought the community fund would make sense because they did all this COVID relief and COVID was the main reason we couldn’t make the trip.”

Islesboro Community Fund president Fred Thomas said the Class of 2021 donation specifically helped islanders facing unforeseen medical expenses and food security issues due to the pandemic. It also helped offset the cost of running the COVID-19 vaccination clinic on the island.

Islesboro Central School seniors practice marching prior to graduation, which will take place on Sunday, June 13th. Photo Credit: Courtesy Olivia Britton

“Everyone is very proud of them,” said Thomas. “I think it’s more than generous. Not only does it show maturity beyond their years, it also shows that these students are aware of the need in their community and are ready to do something about it. ”

He and others will officially recognize the students’ gift on Sunday, June 13, just before their high school graduation ceremony.

“Adults, those over 50, usually complain about today’s youth,” said Thomas. “I think the opposite is the case with these guys at least.”

For their part, the students thought it was cool that their donation helped the islanders get vaccinated and hope that with the money they have reserved they can do something as a class, which John van Dis, a science teacher at Islesboro Central School and one of the Senior Class Advisors, the estimate is between $ 2,000 and $ 3,000.

It won’t be a trip to Italy or Greece. But for the 2021 class, it’ll be a chance to do something fun with their friends before they blow up and leave high school behind for good.

“Many seniors have missed a lot. It was part of that kind of shared experience of the absence of rites of passage, ”said Britton. “We said it would be fun to play bowling, play mini golf, and get pizza.”

Nick Chubb denies declare he took cash to remain at Georgia his senior yr

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Browns run back Nick Chubb Denies an allegation he accepted cash payments to stay in Georgia for his senior year.

A Georgia high school soccer coach named Rush Propst has claimed that when Chubb decided to return to Georgia for his senior season in 2017 instead of entering the NFL draft, Chubb gave Chubb a total of $ 180,000 to help him convince.

“If I needed money, I would have gone for #fakenews,” Chubb said tweeted.

Propst claimed in a secretly taped conversation that both Georgia and Alabama routinely pay players cash.

Amazon leisure exec Marc Whitten departs, joins Unity as senior vice chairman

Marc Whitten. (GeekWire Photo / Nat Levy)

Amazon exec Marc Whitten left the company to take up a position at Unity Technologies in Bellevue, Wash.

Whitten joined Amazon in 2016 and oversaw projects such as Fire TV, Kindle, and the upcoming cloud gaming service Luna.

He is perhaps best known for his 17 years with MicrosoftAs Xbox’s Chief Product Officer, Whitten was one of the main architects of the Xbox Live online service, working on three generations of console hardware. He also spent two years at Sonos.

Whitten’s departure from Amazon was announced by Unity CEO John Riccitiello during an earnings call earlier this month, however diversity and others reported on the move this week.

“Marc is an incredible leader in the world of technology and entertainment,” said Riccitiello, adding that Whitten “brings a lot to Unity and his leadership will help us grow and grow faster for the months and years to come.”

Variety reported that Daniel Rausch, Vice President of Smart Home, will now lead the Fire TV and Luna businesses.

Whitten made a note of his this week Twitter account that he “only delves” at Unity, where his official position is Senior Vice President and General Manager of Unity Create Solutions.

Unity’s main product is the cross-platform game engine of the same name, which was introduced in 2005. Since its debut, Unity has run hundreds of games across the market, from garage projects to mainstream hits like Fall Guys: Ultimate Knockout and Pokemon Go. A limited version of Unity can be downloaded for free. For larger studios, however, an annual service fee is charged for access to the software.

The company offers both Unity Create, a selection of developer tools for game design and 3D modeling, and Unity Operate, which offers business functions such as backend management. In one February 24 blog On the Unity website, the company claims that 94 of the world’s top 100 development studios are using Unity Create, Unity Operate, or both.

unit raised more than $ 1.3 billion after going public in September.