China critic Sen. Tommy Tuberville once more purchased Alibaba inventory, choices

Senator Tommy Tuberville, R-Ala., conducts a press briefing on the Senate subway to propose a vote today on the Jan. 6 commission and the Endless Frontier Act and the Innovation and Competition Act by June, Friday, May 28, 2021.

Tom Williams | CQ Roll Call, Inc. | Getty Images

Alabama Senator Tommy Tuberville, who is an outspoken critic of China and companies there, has been buying and selling shares and options in the Chinese e-commerce giant since last summer Alibaba after asking questions about similar transactions, reveal disclosure reports.

Tuberville made three separate purchases with his wife Suzanne Tuberville as recently as December Alibaba shares valued at up to $300,000 in total, according to a financial report filed Wednesday.

Republican spokeswoman in July told CNBC that in mid-2020 he ordered his financial advisors to sell a small stake in Alibaba stock after learning it was in his portfolio.

That earlier stock sale, worth less than $5,000, came as the former Auburn University football coach was running for the Senate seat.

Tuberville was exposed in July for violating a federal financial transparency law, the STOCK Act, by failing to file disclosures of about 130 stock and stock option trades from January 2021 to May 2021 within a 45-day period.

These trades included a sale of shares on January 25, 2021 put options Per Alibaba Group Holding Limited.

The sale of the put options – which would give their holders the right to sell Alibaba at a share price of $230 by Sept. 19 – was valued at $15,001 to $50,000.

That sale came months after the sale of Alibaba shares that its spokeswoman described.

His spokeswoman at the time said Tuberville wasn’t even aware of the deals because they were being handled by his financial advisors.

Earlier that same month, on July 14, Tuberville and his wife had jointly purchased between $15,001 and $50,000 worth of put options in Alibaba, while on the same day selling put options from the company at a slightly lower strike price, the were rated the same height.

Those transactions were only disclosed in a report Tuberville filed in August, after the news reported his violation of the Stock Corporation Act.

On September 13, Tuberville and his wife sold Alibaba options with an exercise price of $230 in four separate trades, and bought Alibaba put options with the same strike price, another disclosure shows. Overall, these transactions were valued at between approximately $80,000 and $215,000.

On Wednesday, the spokeswoman again referred to his financial advisors when asked about his together the account’s recent Alibaba stock purchases.

“Senator Tuberville has long had financial advisors actively managing his portfolio without his day-to-day involvement,” she said in an email.

Asked if Tuberville now plans to tell those advisors not to trade shares in Alibaba or other Chinese companies, given his criticism of China, the spokeswoman said, “Of course.”

In his financial disclosure filed on Wednesday, Tuberville said he and his wife bought between $50,001 and $100,000 worth of American Depositary shares in Alibaba Group Holding Limited on Dec. 14 through their joint account.

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The next day, according to the disclosure, the Tubervilles bought Alibaba shares valued in the same value range, which allows lawmakers to report transactions in ranges rather than exact amounts.

On Dec. 21, the Tuberville account bought between $15,001 and $50,000 worth of Alibaba stock, the disclosure said.

The pair then conducted a “partial” sale of Alibaba stock on Dec. 23, valued at $50,001 to $100,000, which the senator described on the form.

The congresstrading.com Twitter account, which tracks the Legislature’s disclosure documents, updated CNBC on Tuberville’s purchases of Alibaba stock.

Tuberville in June had lauded President Joe Biden for issuing an executive order that would allow the United States to issue a ban US investments in Chinese companies that the White House said would undermine the security or democratic values ​​of the US and its allies.

In a statement at the time, Tuberville said, “Chinese companies routinely violate U.S. sanctions laws and actively facilitate the Chinese Communist Party’s military expansion and persecution of religious minorities.”

In May, Tuberville introduced the China TSP Investment Ban Act, which would permanently ban federal retirement savings plans from investing in a Chinese company.

In addition to Alibaba trades, Tuberville and his wife also bought shares in last month Stratasys Ltd. with a value between 15,001 and 50,000 US dollars and a partial sale or the likef apple Shares valued at $50,001 to $100,000, according to the disclosure.

The couple also bought stock options for Invesco QQQ Trust, Series 1, and for Cleveland Cliffs, and options sold for PayPal and ChannelAdvisor Corp.

The Tuberville individual account bought a commodity futures contract for the delivery of cattle in April ranging from $1,001 to $15,000.

Sen. Tim Kaine amongst a whole lot trapped in Virginia snowstorm visitors jam

This image, provided by the Virginia Department of Transportation, shows a closed section of Interstate 95 near Fredericksburg, Virginia. Monday, January 3, 2022.

Virginia Department of Transportation | AP

Virginia Senator Tim Kaine is among hundreds of drivers trapped in a brutal traffic jam caused by heavy snow and icy roads for hours on a freeway outside Washington Tuesday morning.

“I started my normal 2-hour drive to DC at 1:00 pm yesterday,” Kaine tweeted at 8:27 am ET. “19 hours later, I’m still not anywhere near the Capitol.”

Still in his car at around 10 p.m. ET, Kaine tweeted, “A CT family returning from Florida in a crowded car stopped by in the middle of the night handing out oranges when we were stopped for hours on I-95.

“This was a miserable experience, but at some point I made the switch from a miserable travel experience to some kind of survival project,” Kaine said Tuesday morning in a telephone interview with Washington radio station WTOP.

The Democratic senator, who ran Hillary Clinton’s runner-up against former President Donald Trump in the 2016 election, said he intended to go back to work on Monday Continue Senate negotiations on a voting rights agreement. But more than 21 hours after leaving his home in Richmond, he has still not passed Stafford Airport, which is about 50 miles from Washington.

“I’ve never seen anything like it, I think that’s all I can say,” Kaine said.

The Virginia Department of Transportation has closed I-95, with reports of disabled vehicles and fallen trees in the Fredericksburg area, about 50 miles south of DC

“We got an estimated 20-30 trucks stuck” on the I-95 heading north, tweeted the VDOT Fredericksburg shortly before midnight.

Conditions are dangerous on other roads in Virginia as well. The VDOT warns Louisa County of “multiple unfolded semi-trailers” on US Route 522 overnight.

“We wish we had a timetable, estimated time of arrival, or an educated guess as to when we would resume travel on I-95. Several incidents have come to a standstill in our area. It’s frustrating and scary, ”tweeted VDOT Fredericksburg on Monday evening.

NBC News’s Josh Lederman, also stuck in his vehicle overnight, called the scene “pretty dystopian” in an interview on MSNBC’s Morning Joe Tuesday morning.

“Nobody knows how long we will stay here or how we will get out,” he reported from his car.

Other drivers stranded in traffic had to park their cars to save gas, even as temperatures dropped well below freezing overnight, Lederman said.

Virginia Governor Ralph Northam tweeted Tuesday morning that “state and local emergency services continue to cut fallen trees, assist disabled vehicles, and reroute drivers.”

“An emergency message goes out to any stranded drivers they associate with assistance, and the state is working with communities to open warming shelters if necessary. While sunlight is supposed to help @VaDOT clear the street, all Virginians should continue to avoid 1-95, ”Northam tweeted.

Another reporter, Jim DeFede of CBS News, said in a video posted at 10 a.m. ET that he was stuck on I-95 near Quantico for nearly 18 hours.

This is the evolution of news. Please check again for updates.

GOP Sen. says Trump impeachment trial may set a harmful precedent

Ohio Republican Senator Rob Portman told CNBC why he had joined 44 other Republicans to deny the constitutionality of the charges against former President Donald Trump.

“I think the constitutional question needs to be addressed and not tabled and not put aside, and as a juror I will listen to both sides, but we have to deal with the constitutional question and the precedent that would create. So if you look at the constitution … it’s about the distance, and this is a private person now, Donald Trump, not a president, “Portman said during a pre-recorded interview Thursday night “The news with Shepard Smith.”

Kentucky Senator Rand Paul initiated charges of dismissing the constitutionality of the trial. Firstly, on the grounds that Trump is no longer in office, and secondly, given that the Senate President Patrick Leahy (D-VT) is presiding over the process in place of the Supreme Court Justice John Roberts becomes.

Roberts led Trump’s first impeachment trial, but he won’t repeat the role a second time. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer from New York told Rachel Maddow of MSNBC Show on Monday that the decision to chair it was Roberts’.

“The constitution says that the chief judge presides over a seated president,” said Schumer. “So it won’t be so – so it was up to John Roberts to see if he wanted to preside over a president who is no longer in office, Trump. And he doesn’t want to do it.”

Portman told host Shepard Smith he was concerned about the precedent this impeachment trial could set.

“Think about the precedent of saying that Republicans could go after President Obama or President Clinton or Democrats George W. Bush as a private citizen,” Portman said.

Portman had previously specified that Trump has “some responsibility” for the January 6th uprising in the Capitol. He did not support Trump’s efforts to scrap the 2020 election results and voted to maintain the certified January 6 election results and delayed the count.

Smith pressed Portman on what he thought was an appropriate punishment for Trump.

“A proper consequence, as I have said very clearly, is that people speak before, openly and during and after, and I think that it is also important that the House acted, so there have been consequences that way . ” said Portman.

Portman announced that he will not seek re-election next year, but will serve his term until January 3, 2023. He said he “will not miss out on politics and partisanship, and that will get more difficult over time.” “”

Sen. Bernie Sanders is utilizing his inauguration meme to lift cash for charity

Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders uses his internet fame from his inaugural meme to raise money for charity.

The senator continues to sell sweaters his campaign website with the picture of him sitting in the audience at the inauguration in a mask and mittens that went viral earlier this week. The sweaters are $ 45 each and are small to twice the size.

The downside is that they are currently sold out. And if you’ve been lucky enough to snag one, it could take anywhere from four to eight weeks to get you due to the overwhelming demand.

The good news is that all proceeds from the sale of sweaters will be donated to Meals on Wheels Vermont, according to Meals on Wheels Vermont Sanders’ website.

Bernie’s meme went viral for the first time on Wednesday, and the internet began photoshoping the Senator under various circumstances.

Even some of San Antonio’s landmarks, restaurants, and universities joined the social media trendand people love it.

You can find more information about the sweaters at Click here.

ALSO READ: San Antonio’s Best Bernie Sanders Memes After The Housewarming Photo Go Viral

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