Amid one other Covid surge, faculties and companies discover plans disrupted

A health care professional conducts a COVID-19 PCR test at a vacant testing site in Farragut Square on December 28, 2021 in Washington, DC.

Anna Money Maker | Getty Images

A Covid-19 outbreak on a cruise in Lisbon. Thousands of flights canceled. Colleges are going far away again.

It’s a new year, but the pandemic continues to cause many of the same massive disruptions in American life that it has had for nearly two years.

The most recent culpable variant is that omicron trunkthat is highly transmissible and tends to elude protection from vaccines. For the past week, a seven-day average of new daily infections with the virus topped 386,000, doubling from the previous week, according to CNBC analysis of data from Johns Hopkins University. Rates are likely to be even higher as there are delays in reporting the holidays and an increase in home testing, which may keep cases off officials’ radar.

The rise in new Covid-19 cases means that attempts by companies and schools to resume normal operations after the holidays are again being turned upside down.

Companies postpone their return dates to the peak of the cases, including Chevron, Apple, Google and Over.

Dozens of colleges have announced that they are moving their courses online. Harvard University announced that it will remotely relocate much of its work and learning for at least the first three weeks of January.

“Please know that we are not taking this step lightly,” Harvard officials said wrote in a letter to staff and students. “This is being triggered by the rapid rise in COVID-19 cases locally and across the country.”

There are other schools that are also making the change The University of Chicago, George Washington University and Columbia University. Many colleges will likely require students to get their booster vaccinations in the spring as breakthrough cases become more common.

Local school districts across the country are also rethinking their plans. Some districts are switching back to distance learning or hybrid learning, while others are trying to reduce the children’s stress on each other by having students attend classes on a changed schedule with no lunch breaks.

Although there has been an explosion in Covid cases in New York City, the largest school district in the country, the school system will open as scheduled on Monday. The district hopes Reinforce testing efforts To hold lessons in person. There are plans to double the pace of testing in both vaccinated and unvaccinated students. Students are tested even if they show no symptoms or have been in contact with someone who has the virus.

One concern is that people are returning from vacation and visiting family and friends over the holidays and have been unknowingly exposed to Covid.

As the rush home began, travel was turned upside down by both the virus and the stormy weather that has brought some planes to a standstill.

Until Saturday afternoon are more than 2,500 US flights was canceled, according to to the tracking service FlightAware. Some of the disruptions are also due to winter storms.

A cruise ship with over 4,000 people on board was stopped in Lisbon, Portugal, due to a Covid-19 outbreak among crew members, the AP reported on Saturday. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said On Thursday, Americans should avoid cruising regardless of their vaccination status.

– The Associated Press contributed to this report.

With Assist Cash, US Faculties Place Consideration on Psychological Well being

Schools in the United States are using a large increase in federal funding to support student mental health.

School systems or districts are given a lot of freedom in how they can spend the federal money. But psychological problems in the students had become clear. Districts have an increase in behavioral problems, and signs of stress Absenteeism when students returned to class this fall. For many, it was the first time back in a full classroom since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic.

In Kansas City, Kansas, educators open an after-school mental health center. The center is filled with advisor and social workers. Schools in Chicago, Illinois have “mentoring teams” on a mission to help students in difficulty.

In some school districts, the money has supported longstanding work to help students deal with trauma – difficult experiences that have led to emotional problems. Other school systems have made new efforts to treat students. Overall, money puts public schools at the center of efforts to improve the overall well-being of students.

When the government sent aid to schools after the economic recession in 2008, conversation didn’t happen, ”said Amanda Fitzgerald. She is with the American School Counselor Association. Now, according to Fitzgerald, the discussion across the country is very much about student welfare.

Last month, three major child health groups said the child mental health situation should be viewed as a national emergency. The U.S. Department of Education has called on the aid to rethink the way schools offer psychological support. Education Minister Miguel Cardona said mental health needs to be at the center of recovery from the pandemic.

Pandemic aid to schools is $ 190 billion. That’s more than four times what the Department of Education normally spends kindergarten up to 12th grade every year. The money for mental health services went towards employee training, mental health assessments, and classes that include social and emotional learning.

Fifth grader Jordan Falconbury reads in a tent while visiting a sensory room at Quincy Elementary School in Topeka, Kansas on Wednesday, November 3, 2021 (AP Photo / Charlie Riedel)

Many counties have worked on it rent more mental health experts. The National Association of School Psychologists surveyed its members in the fall. It found that more than half of the districts had plans to host social workers, Psychologists or consultant.

With $ 9.5 million in federal and external grants, Paterson Schools in New Jersey added five behavioral experts. The district also hired two substance abuse experts and workers who were able to identify students in crisis.

Paterson is one of the poorest parts of New Jersey. Many of the 25,000 students there were hungry before the pandemic and struggled after family members lost their jobs, Superintendent Eileen Shafer said.

“We wanted to make sure that before we tried to teach anything new, we could handle where our kids are based on what they went through,” she said.

In Ellicottville, New York, school psychologist Joe Prior sees more anxiety among students. He said the district would use the help to hire a counselor to connect students with psychological help.

Chicago, the third largest school district in the country, created a “cure plan” for students using $ 24 million of the $ 2.6 billion in federal aid.

In Detroit, the district spends $ 34 million on mental health programs. The school system uses the money to screen students, expand help from outside mental health providers, and provide additional support to parents.

On a last Wednesday that meant an hour meditation Parents meet at a local cafe. One parent feared that their own stress was affecting their son’s ability to learn.

“As a community, we’ve all been through something,” said Sharlonda Buckman, an assistant superintendent who attended the meeting. “Part of the recovery has to be something” intentionally work in spaces like this so we can be there for ours children. “

I am Dan Novak.

The Associated Press and Chalkbeat covered this story. Dan Novak adapted it for VOA Learning English. Ashley Thompson was the editor.

Quiz – U.S. schools use aid funds to monitor mental health


Start the quiz to find out

________________________________________

Words in this story

absent – adj. not present in a usual or expected place

advisor – n. a person who provides professional advice

conversation – n. an informal conversation with two people or a small group of people: the act of informal conversation

kindergarten – n. a school or class for very young children

rent – v. Giving (someone) a job or a job in exchange for wages or salaries

psychologist – n. a scientist who specializes in the study and treatment of mind and behavior

anxiety – n. Fear or nervousness about what might happen

meditation– n. the act or process of spending time in silent thought

intentionally – adj. be done in a planned or intended manner

child – n. a young person

With US Assist Cash, Colleges Put Larger Concentrate on Psychological Well being

In Kansas City, Kansas, educators open an after-school mental health clinic staffed with school counselors and social workers. Schools in Paterson, New Jersey have set up socio-emotional learning teams to identify students dealing with crisis. Chicago sets up “mentoring teams” with a mission to help students in difficulty on its 500+ campuses.

With a stroke of luck in federal coronavirus relief funds, schools in the United States are using parts to quickly expand their capacity to deal with students’ mental health issues.

While school districts have plenty of leeway in using the aid funds, the urgency of the problem has been made clear by absenteeism, behavioral issues and quieter signs of distress as many students hit for the first time since the coronavirus pandemic this fall.

In some school systems, the money has fueled longstanding trauma-coping work. Others have made new efforts to screen, counsel, and treat students. All in all, investment has put public schools at the center of efforts for the general welfare of students more than ever.

“In the last recession, with the last big chunk of recovery money, that conversation didn’t take place,” said Amanda Fitzgerald, assistant director of the American School Counselor Association. “Now the tone is very much geared towards the well-being of the students across the country.”

Last month, three major pediatric groups said the state of children’s mental health should be considered a national emergency. The US Department of Education has pointed out aid distribution to rethink how schools provide psychological support. Mental wellbeing, said Education Minister Miguel Cardona, must be the foundation for recovery from the pandemic.

Pandemic aid to schools is $ 190 billion, more than four times the amount the Department of Education typically spends annually on K-12 schools. Investments in mental health have gone into employee training, wellness screenings and curricula for social-emotional learning.

Questions remain, however, as to how schools will find ways to reap the benefits beyond the one-time cash injection, address privacy concerns, and track the effectiveness of their efforts. The implementation worries Katie Dockweiler, a Nevada school psychologist who sits on the state education committee.

“Not all programs are created equal,” she said. “It really depends on how it is implemented, school by school. And there is a lot of variability.”

She said the districts should develop ways to track the impact on students: “Otherwise we’ll just throw our money away.”

At the top of the list for many districts is the recruitment of new mental health specialists. When the National Association of School Psychologists surveyed members this fall, more than half of those polled said their districts intend to add social workers, psychologists or counselors, according to policy director Kelly Vaillancourt Strobach.

With $ 9.5 million in federal aid and outside grants, the Paterson Schools added five behavioral analysts, two substance abuse coordinators, and the teams to identify students in crisis situations.

In Paterson, one of the lowest-income parts of New Jersey, many of the 25,000 college students faced food insecurity prior to the pandemic and struggled after family members lost their jobs, Superintendent Eileen Shafer said.

“Before we tried to teach anything new, we wanted to make sure we were able to navigate where our children are based on what they’ve been through,” she said.

A student works on a puzzle while visiting a French middle school sensory room in Topeka, Kansas on Wednesday, November 3, 2021. The rooms are designed to relieve student stress when they return to classrooms amid the ongoing pandemic.

In rural Ellicottville, New York, where school psychologist Joe Prior sees more anxiety and a “marked increase” in panic attacks, the district plans to hire a life-saving agent to connect students with psychological help. But the position remains vacant as only a few have expressed interest.

“I have more students who just look into my eyes and say, ‘I’m completely overwhelmed and don’t know how to deal with it,'” said Erich Ploetz, headmaster of Ellicottville High School.

It’s not the only district where hiring ambitions have exceeded the number of skilled workers available. Some districts have turned to outside providers to fill mental health positions while others are training existing staff.

The Kansas City, Kansas school system is using a portion of the $ 918,000 mental health grant to pay for social workers and counselors who are already on the job at the new afternoon clinic. The district has also added staff and mental health exams.

Angela Dunn, who leads mental health and suicide prevention initiatives for the 22,000 student district, said the mental health team has responded to 27 student deaths and 16 employee deaths since the pandemic began, double the number over that period typical. She said a handful of employees died from COVID-19, but many of the others were murders, suicides and overdoses.

A student shares her feelings while visiting a sensory room at Williams Elementary School on November 3, 2021 in Topeka, Kansas.

Schools’ investments in student mental health services have raised some privacy concerns, particularly where schools are now monitoring student computers for distress signals or performing mental health tests on all students. But the notion that it’s not where schools can get involved at all has been forgotten.

“We just realized that students like to go to school to seek help,” said Dunn.

Chicago, the country’s third largest school district, unveiled a “cure plan” for high school students using $ 24 million of its $ 2.6 billion in stimulus funds.

Over the course of three years, the district will expand “mentoring teams” – construction personnel who serve as the first point of contact for students in difficulty – to each campus. 200 schools are to be reached by spring.

The headmistress Angélica Altamirano used some of these funds to open a room that is furnished with comfortable furniture and a used air hockey table. The campus center has already offered mourning groups for deceased students or friends and helped teachers deal with burnout.

In Topeka, Kansas, $ 100,000 was allocated for soothing items and sensory room personnel, including one at the Quincy Elementary. When students are so frustrated that they lay their heads on their desks, wander into the hallway, or cry, teachers can send them to the Roadrunner Room. There they can climb into a tent and snuggle under a weighted blanket, put together a puzzle, play with sand or build with Legos.

The Dean of Studies Andrea Keck observed how the room became a point of contact for a student in order to reduce frustrations.

“She can log it, have her hair pinned up, whatever she needs, and then she can be successful for the rest of the day,” says Keck, who oversees the room.

In Detroit, the district is spending $ 34 million on mental health initiatives, including screening high school students, expanding help from outside mental health providers, and providing additional support for parents.

Last Wednesday, that meant an hour-long meditation session for parents in a local coffee shop. One participant feared that her own stress was affecting her son’s ability to learn.

“As a community, we’ve all been through something,” said Sharlonda Buckman, an assistant superintendent who attended the meeting. “Part of recovery has to be deliberate work in spaces like this so we can be there for our children.”

With U.S. help cash, faculties put larger deal with psychological well being

CHICAGO – Educators are opening an after-school mental health clinic in Kansas City, Kansas, staffed with school counselors and social workers. Schools in Paterson, New Jersey have set up socio-emotional learning teams to identify students dealing with crisis. Chicago sets up “mentoring teams” with a mission to help students in difficulty on its 500+ campuses.

With a stroke of luck in federal coronavirus relief funds, schools in the United States are using parts to quickly expand their capacity to deal with students’ mental health issues.

While school districts have plenty of leeway in using the aid funds, the urgency of the problem has been made clear by absenteeism, behavioral issues and quieter signs of distress as many students hit for the first time since the coronavirus pandemic this fall.

In some school systems, the money has fueled longstanding trauma-coping work. Others have made new efforts to screen, counsel, and treat students. All in all, investment has put public schools at the center of efforts for the general welfare of students more than ever.

“In the last recession, with the last big chunk of recovery money, that conversation didn’t take place,” said Amanda Fitzgerald, assistant director of the American School Counselor Association. “Now the tone is very much geared towards the well-being of the students across the country.”

Last month, three major pediatric groups said the state of children’s mental health should be considered a national emergency. The US Department of Education has pointed out aid distribution to rethink how schools provide psychological support. Mental wellbeing, said Education Minister Miguel Cardona, must be the foundation for recovery from the pandemic.

Pandemic aid to schools is $ 190 billion, more than four times the amount the Department of Education typically spends annually on K-12 schools. Investments in mental health have gone into employee training, wellness screenings and curricula for social-emotional learning.

Questions remain, however, as to how schools will find ways to reap the benefits beyond the one-time cash injection, address privacy concerns, and track the effectiveness of their efforts. The implementation worries Katie Dockweiler, a Nevada school psychologist who sits on the state education committee.

“Not all programs are created equal,” she said. “It really depends on how it’s done, school by school. And there is a great deal of variability. “

She said the districts should develop ways to track the impact on students: “Otherwise we’ll just throw our money away.”

At the top of the list for many districts is the recruitment of new mental health specialists. When the National Association of School Psychologists surveyed members this fall, more than half of those polled said their districts intend to add social workers, psychologists or counselors, according to policy director Kelly Vaillancourt Strobach.

With $ 9.5 million in federal aid and outside grants, the Paterson Schools added five behavioral analysts, two substance abuse coordinators, and the teams to identify students in crisis situations.

In Paterson, one of the lowest-income parts of New Jersey, many of the 25,000 college students faced food insecurity prior to the pandemic and struggled after family members lost their jobs, Superintendent Eileen Shafer said.

“Before we tried to teach anything new, we wanted to make sure we could handle where our kids are based on what they’ve been through,” she said.

In rural Ellicottville, New York, where school psychologist Joe Prior sees more anxiety and a “marked increase” in panic attacks, the district plans to hire a life-saving agent to connect students with psychological help. But the position remains vacant as only a few have expressed interest.

“I have more students who just look into my eyes and say, ‘I’m completely overwhelmed and don’t know how to deal with it,'” said Erich Ploetz, Headmaster of Ellicottville High School.

It’s not the only district where hiring ambitions have exceeded the number of skilled workers available. Some districts have turned to outside providers to fill mental health positions while others are training existing staff.

The Kansas City, Kansas school system is using a portion of the $ 918,000 mental health grant to pay for social workers and counselors who are already on the job at the new afternoon clinic. The district has also added staff and mental health exams.

Angela Dunn, who leads mental health and suicide prevention initiatives for the 22,000 student district, said the mental health team has responded to 27 student deaths and 16 employee deaths since the pandemic began, double the number over that period typical. She said a handful of employees died from COVID-19, but many of the others were murders, suicides and overdoses.

Schools’ investments in student mental health services have raised some privacy concerns, particularly where schools are now monitoring student computers for distress signals or performing mental health tests on all students. But the notion that it’s not where schools can get involved at all has been forgotten.

“We just realized that students are comfortable seeking help in a school,” said Dunn.

Chicago, the third largest school district in the country, unveiled a “cure plan” for high school students using $ 24 million of its $ 2.6 billion in stimulus funds.

Over the course of three years, the district will expand “mentoring teams” – construction personnel who serve as the first response to students in difficulty – to each campus. 200 schools are to be reached by spring.

The headmistress Angélica Altamirano used some of these funds to open a room that is furnished with comfortable furniture and a used air hockey table. The campus center has already offered mourning groups for deceased students or friends and helped teachers deal with burnout.

In Topeka, Kansas, $ 100,000 was allocated for soothing items and sensory room personnel, including one at the Quincy Elementary. When students are so frustrated that they lay their heads on their desks, wander into the hallway, or cry, teachers can send them to the Roadrunner Room. There they can climb into a tent and snuggle under a weighted blanket, put together a puzzle, play with sand or build with Legos.

The Dean of Studies Andrea Keck observed how the room became a point of contact for a student in order to reduce frustrations.

“She can log it, have her hair pinned up, whatever she needs, and then she can be successful for the rest of the day,” says Keck, who oversees the room.

In Detroit, the district is spending $ 34 million on mental health initiatives, including screening high school students, expanding help from outside mental health providers, and providing additional support for parents.

Last Wednesday, that meant an hour-long meditation session for parents in a local coffee shop. One participant feared that her own stress was affecting her son’s ability to learn.

“As a community, we’ve all been through something,” said Sharlonda Buckman, an assistant superintendent who attended the meeting. “Part of recovery has to be deliberate work in spaces like this so we can be there for our children.”

With US support cash, colleges put greater concentrate on psychological well being

CHICAGO (AP) – Educators are opening an after-school mental health clinic in Kansas City, Kansas, staffed with school counselors and social workers. Schools in Paterson, New Jersey have set up socio-emotional learning teams to identify students dealing with crisis. Chicago sets up “mentoring teams” with a mission to help students in difficulty on its 500+ campuses.

With a stroke of luck in federal coronavirus relief funds, schools in the United States are using parts to quickly expand their capacity to deal with students’ mental health issues.

While the school districts have a lot of leeway in how to spend the aid, the urgency of the problem was evident Absenteeism, behavior problems, and quieter signs of stress So many students returned to school buildings for the first time since the coronavirus pandemic this fall.

In some school systems, the money has fueled longstanding trauma-coping work. Others have made new efforts to screen, counsel, and treat students. All in all, investment has put public schools at the center of efforts for the general welfare of students more than ever.

“In the last recession, with the last big chunk of recovery money, that conversation didn’t take place,” said Amanda Fitzgerald, assistant director of the American School Counselor Association. “Now the tone is very much geared towards the well-being of the students across the country.”

Last month, three major pediatric groups said the state of children’s mental health should be considered a national emergency. The US Department of Education has pointed out aid distribution to rethink how schools provide psychological support. Mental wellbeing, said Education Minister Miguel Cardona, must be the foundation for recovery from the pandemic.

Pandemic aid to schools is $ 190 billion, more than four times the amount the Department of Education typically spends annually on K-12 schools. Investments in mental health have gone into employee training, wellness screenings and curricula for social-emotional learning.

Questions remain, however, as to how schools will find ways to reap the benefits beyond the one-time cash injection, address privacy concerns, and track the effectiveness of their efforts. The implementation worries Katie Dockweiler, a Nevada school psychologist who sits on the state education committee.

“Not all programs are created equal,” she said. “It really depends on how it’s done, school by school. And there is a great deal of variability. “

She said the districts should develop ways to track the impact on students: “Otherwise we’ll just throw our money away.”

At the top of the list for many districts is the recruitment of new mental health specialists. When the National Association of School Psychologists surveyed members this fall, more than half of those polled said their districts intend to add social workers, psychologists or counselors, according to policy director Kelly Vaillancourt Strobach.

With $ 9.5 million in federal aid and outside grants, the Paterson Schools added five behavioral analysts, two substance abuse coordinators, and the teams to identify students in crisis situations.

In Paterson, one of the lowest-income parts of New Jersey, many of the 25,000 college students faced food insecurity prior to the pandemic and struggled after family members lost their jobs, Superintendent Eileen Shafer said.

“Before we tried to teach anything new, we wanted to make sure we could handle where our kids are based on what they’ve been through,” she said.

In rural Ellicottville, New York, where school psychologist Joe Prior sees more anxiety and a “marked increase” in panic attacks, the district plans to hire a life-saving agent to connect students with psychological help. But the position remains vacant as only a few have expressed interest.

“I have more students who just look into my eyes and say, ‘I’m completely overwhelmed and don’t know how to deal with it,'” said Erich Ploetz, Headmaster of Ellicottville High School.

It’s not the only district where hiring ambitions have exceeded the number of skilled workers available. Some districts have turned to outside providers to fill mental health positions while others are training existing staff.

The Kansas City, Kansas school system is using a portion of the $ 918,000 mental health grant to pay for social workers and counselors who are already on the job at the new afternoon clinic. The district has also added staff and mental health exams.

Angela Dunn, who leads mental health and suicide prevention initiatives for the 22,000 student district, said the mental health team has responded to 27 student deaths and 16 employee deaths since the pandemic began, double the number over that period typical. She said a handful of employees died from COVID-19, but many of the others were murders, suicides and overdoses.

Schools’ investments in student mental health services have raised some privacy concerns, particularly where schools are now monitoring student computers for distress signals or performing mental health tests on all students. But the notion that it’s not where schools can get involved at all has been forgotten.

“We just realized that students are comfortable seeking help in a school,” said Dunn.

Chicago, the third largest school district in the country, unveiled a “cure plan” for high school students using $ 24 million of its $ 2.6 billion in stimulus funds.

Over the course of three years, the district will expand “mentoring teams” – construction personnel who serve as the first response to students in difficulty – to each campus. 200 schools are to be reached by spring.

The headmistress Angélica Altamirano used some of these funds to open a room that is furnished with comfortable furniture and a used air hockey table. The campus center has already offered mourning groups for deceased students or friends and helped teachers deal with burnout.

In Topeka, Kansas, $ 100,000 was allocated for soothing items and sensory room personnel, including one at the Quincy Elementary. When students are so frustrated that they lay their heads on their desks, wander into the hallway, or cry, teachers can send them to the Roadrunner Room. There they can climb into a tent and snuggle under a weighted blanket, put together a puzzle, play with sand or build with Legos.

The Dean of Studies Andrea Keck observed how the room became a point of contact for a student in order to reduce frustrations.

“She can log it, have her hair pinned up, whatever she needs, and then she can be successful for the rest of the day,” says Keck, who oversees the room.

In Detroit, the district is spending $ 34 million on mental health initiatives, including screening high school students, expanding help from outside mental health providers, and providing additional support for parents.

Last Wednesday, that meant an hour-long meditation session for parents in a local coffee shop. One participant feared that her own stress was affecting her son’s ability to learn.

“As a community, we’ve all been through something,” said Sharlonda Buckman, an assistant superintendent who attended the meeting. “Part of recovery has to be deliberate work in spaces like this so we can be there for our children.”

___

Thompson reported from Ellicottville, New York and Hollingsworth from Mission, Kansas. Chalkbeat writers Catherine Carrera in Newark, New Jersey, Cassie Walker Burke in Chicago and Lori Higgins in Detroit, and Associated Press writer Collin Binkley in Boston contributed to this report.

Georgia public faculties obtain federal cash

But long-term budget problems remain.

ATLANTA – A Federal budget agreement Washington could mean more spending on local schools in Metro Atlanta.

The state has steadily reduced its share of public school funding over the past 20 years – even if the costs have risen sharply.

School buses are a major turning point. According to the Georgia Budget Policy Institute, the state funded 54% of school travel in the 1990s. Today it’s 14%, according to the GBPI, although it now costs more to buy and operate school buses.

This money comes from money that is used for education.

“So fewer teachers, fewer resources for children in need because the state continues to undermine and underfund public education,” said Stephen Owens of the Georgia Budget Policy Institute.

Owens says the federal government will pour billions of new dollars into Georgia public schools. But in a state where Owens says class sizes have grown and technology has lagged for the past twenty years, federal funding is unlikely to fix chronic government underfunding of public education.

“Perhaps, instead of investing this money in human infrastructure like school counselors or additional teachers, (schools) would instead use that money only for one-time expenses, staff loyalty rewards, and changes to the school building,” Owens said. “If you hire additional people, you only have to fire them again as soon as the federal funds are used up.”

Owens says local taxpayers have picked up much of the loophole left by the state’s underfunding of public schools. He says if the state wanted smaller class sizes and better technology in public schools across Georgia, more government funding would go the best.

More cash, much less divisiveness wanted for colleges – WIZM 92.3FM 1410AM

MADISON, Wisconsin (AP) – Wisconsin’s chief education officer called for more courtesy Thursday as schools across the state grapple with the coronavirus pandemic.

Jill Underly, who is in her freshman year as the headmistress of Wisconsin, condemned angry displays at school committee meetings in her Capitol education speech.

“We should support one another instead of tearing down those who dare to lead in times of crisis,” she said.

Underly, who was elected in April after a Democratic-backed campaign, said the state is missing out on a generation of children by underfunding schools and allowing funding gaps to widen. She called for the establishment of a literacy task force to research and advise educators on how to teach reading more effectively. She also pointed out the need for a government-funded kindergarten for 4-year-olds.

Underly’s power is limited as lawmakers can rewrite their budget proposals and districts can disregard their guidelines on issues such as pandemic safety and curriculum recommendations.

Some school leaders in Wisconsin, like elsewhere in the country, have resigned or withdrawn because of parents’ anger over masking requirements. Many counties do not require masks or other safety protocols despite a surge in COVID-19 cases, including in children.

Wisconsin’s rate of new COVID-19 cases, which has increased in recent months due to the highly contagious Delta variant, was highest in people aged 14 to 17 last week, according to preliminary data from the state Department of Health, The Wisconsin State Journal reported. Children aged 9 to 13 years in Wisconsin had the second highest incidence of new cases.

Underly said that during school tours she noticed that students didn’t mind wearing masks.

“They were ready to do whatever was necessary to protect each other and make their learning disruptive,” she said. “We could learn a lot from them.”

Underly also criticized the legislature for the fact that schools were underfunded for the next two school years despite a historical inflow of taxpayers’ money in the state budget. Republican lawmakers redirected much of the revenue into tax cuts and chose not to raise the state limits on school district revenue.

Democratic Governor Tony Evers, who was Underly’s predecessor as head of state schools, agreed to her call for more school funding in a video response on Thursday.

Republicans argued that about $ 2 billion in federal pandemic aid would bolster schools. However, some school district leaders said the temporary federal funds could not be used to fill the annual budget holes created by the state budget and could lead to layoffs.

Congregation spokesman Robin Vos denied Underly’s arguments that schools needed more funding, reiterating the infusion of federal stimulus funds.

“The Democrats’ unique focus on putting more money in schools is not a winning strategy for our children,” Republican Vos said in a statement. “We need to think about how they are taught and why so many students struggle with the basics – reading, writing, and arithmetic.”

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Faculties nonetheless have billions of federal Covid aid cash to spend

Posted by Katie Lobosco, CNN

(CNN) – Congress approves more than $ 190 billion to help America’s schools reopen and stay open during the pandemic – and while much of the funding has been used to buy PPE, improve ventilation, and promote summer school programs, billions of dollars remain to be spent.

Many local school authorities have not yet decided how to use the final round of funds released in March. In most states, districts are required to submit an expense plan between mid-August and mid-September, which will be refunded when the money is used.

“I am both compassionate and frustrated with the district’s current spending rate,” said Marguerite Roza, professor at Georgetown University’s McCourt School of Public Policy and director of the Edunomics Lab research center.

The Covid aid money – which comes from three different laws – is a huge federal investment of roughly six times the core funding for fiscal year 2021. Congress gave schools more than three years to spend the newest and largest round of cash with few conditions. It is unlikely to be spent all at once, especially if used on teacher salaries or capital improvements that are paid over time.

The money should help schools provide safe, personal tuition for all students new challenges to keep kids in the classroom this fall as the delta variant spreads and families await vaccine approval for children under 12.

Schools in Texas have already topped the highest weekly number of Covid cases from last year. A Lack of bus drivers in Chicago, partly because of Resignation due to vaccination mandate, left families in search of transportation. Parents are frustrated and in some places have it Push school councils into heated debate about masks and vaccines, which fuel interest in local elections.

Here’s what we know about what schools are getting and how they are spending it.

How much money do schools get?

Not every school gets the same amount of money. The law tells states to pay out the money like Title I funding, meaning more money goes to districts with more low-income families. Some districts with very low poverty rates do not receive direct Covid aid funding – but may be eligible for some funding at the discretion of the state.

When the pandemic first broke out, the CARES bill approved about $ 13 billion for K-12 schools, or about $ 270 per student. The bill, passed in December, provided roughly $ 54 billion, or $ 1,100 per student, and the latest and greatest package, the American Rescue Plan, saw spending of $ 128 billion, according to an analysis by FutureEd amount to $ 2,600 per student. another non-partisan think tank at Georgetown University.

Schools spent a large portion of the money from the first relief law, passed a year ago, on PPE, cleaning supplies, technology, and learning management systems that helped students study from home, as well as salaries and wages – so a survey by the Association of School Management Officials carried out in February.

How can schools spend the money?

About 20% of the money a district receives goes to dealing with learning losses – this can include tutoring programs, summer schools, or extended school days in the future.

There are few other constraints on funding, however, so it is largely up to local school authorities to decide how to spend it on a wide range of pandemic-related needs.

The law states that it can be spent on things like plumbing, technology, mental health services, and ventilation systems, to name a few. However, it is not certain that all plans will be fully implemented – especially when it comes to hiring more teachers and counselors who may be hard to find.

Districts are required to solicit public contributions on the use of the money, although public relations efforts vary. Many school authorities discussed spending in public meetings throughout the summer. The topic is often referred to on agendas as the Elementary and Middle School Emergency Fund or ESSER.

States are allowed to keep 10% of the Covid education aid and decide how the money is paid out. They had to file an application with the Ministry of Education earlier this year and will receive the last third of the money once it’s approved. The department has 33 approved so far.

Expenditure plans: tutoring, psychological counseling, renovations

The decentralized nature of the US school system makes it difficult to keep track of how exactly the districts spend the money. A recent poll from the School Superintendents Association noted that the majority of districts plan to use the funds for support staff, technology for Internet access, and professional development for educators. Other top priorities are high-intensity tutoring, additional study time through remuneration of staff for longer working hours and the renovation of facilities.

The Detroit Public School District, For example, plans to use Covid aid funds to give teachers a one-time bonus, tutoring, expanding mental health services, making improvements to facilities, and reducing class size by hiring more teachers.

But not every use can be justified. The Illinois State Board of Education recently rejected the plan of a district,o Use Covid aid dollars for an artificial surface on his soccer field.

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Weymouth colleges has $6.eight million in CARES Act cash to spend

WEYMOUTH – The Schools Department wants information from the public on how to spend nearly $ 7 million coming to the district through the federal emergency fund for elementary and secondary schools.

The district has so far received nearly $ 700,000 through the fund set up under the CARES Act as part of the Education Stabilization Fund. The district also expects an additional $ 2.9 million grant that will help pay for teaching coaches and interventionists, technology, and a universal all-day kindergarten.

“That’s $ 3 million that we didn’t have last year that we can pour into our current school year with positions that have been on our needs list for years and years,” said School Committee Chair Lisa Belmarsh recently held a school committee meeting.

Assistant Superintendent Brian Smith said the application and spending schedule for the city’s third round of funding – $ 6.8 million – is due in early October. The district plans to run a poll this Friday to get input from the public on how the money will be spent.

Smith said the survey will ask the public to prioritize five “buckets” of how they could be used, including community engagement, educational technology, mental health, operation and maintenance, and incomplete learning. It will also look for information on specific ways to spend the money.

Belmarsh said she cannot stress enough how effective the money will be, as the committee and administration are often looking for cuts rather than providing additional funding.

A student at Academy Avenue Elementary School gives Roary the Wildcat, the school mascot, a poke while he goes to school on Wednesday, May 26, 2021.  Mike Mejia / For The Patriot Ledger

“We now have almost $ 10 million for our schools. That has never happened in Weymouth,” she said.

She said she wants the district to use the money to explore the potential for free, universal preschools.

The city received a total of $ 17 million from the CARES Act in addition to funding for the school district.