Zimmerman: San Jose’s timber enhance human well being and get monetary savings

Anyone who has ever read Shel Silverstein’s The Giving Tree knows that people take the benefits and gifts of the trees around us for granted. We underestimate how they affect our lives and how difficult it is to protect them.

It seems like we are finally learning the importance of trees not only to the health of the planet, but also to the health and wellbeing of people in particular.

The right trees in the right place

The main pledge from the COP 26 climate summit was the pledge by countries representing 85% of the world’s forests to stop or reverse deforestation by 2030. The United States, as well as other large forest countries such as Brazil, Canada, and Indonesia have all signed this agreement. President Joe Biden also pledged that the US would lead by example, announcing that it would spend $ 9 billion on forest conservation and restoration.

That promise, and the money to keep it, is a significant step forward. Individual countries need to get creative in dealing with climate change as an international agreement becomes increasingly unlikely. Forests and trees and are an excellent option.

Woods absorb around a third of the CO2 produced worldwide every year. Deforestation has made a major contribution to climate change.

The battle for California’s trees

California has 33 million hectares of forest, and we are rightly proud to encourage visitors to see places like the Redwoods. We conveniently forget or don’t even know that since the 1850s, 95% of the California original old sequoia forests were logged.

California can use its forests in two ways. Reforestation is an option, although it can be full of difficulties such as location problems, water availability and loss of biological diversity. It is much better to focus on protecting the trees and forests that we have and letting those areas expand naturally.

“California’s ancient sequoia trees, the tallest and oldest trees on earth, store more carbon per hectare of forest than any other forest in the world – by far,” said Sam Hodder, CEO of Save the Redwood League. “More than the Amazon rainforest or the coniferous forests of the Pacific Northwest.”

Save the Redwoods League is currently raising funds for the purchase of five miles of undeveloped coastal forest in Mendocino County. the Lost coastal property is a second growth forest between 80 and 100 years and is threatened by accelerated harvest or development. Saving such existing areas and having them expanded and connected to other protected areas is far better, cheaper and requires less maintenance than replanting.

Hodder noted that through accelerated protection and good management in collaboration with tribes, local communities and public institutions, the sequoia landscape can become old again and be a vital part of the fight against climate change.

San Jose trees

Trees in our communities are just as important to human health as large areas of forest hours away. The sheer visibility of green spaces is linked to improved mental health, less stress, and better work and school performance. Put simply, humans need nature, such as trees, in order to thrive.

San Jose’s revised design Community forest management plan cites research that even found that tree-lined streets contribute to healthier lifestyles. Unexpectedly, there are also fewer car accidents. There is even evidence that well-managed vegetation deter crime.

Money doesn’t grow on trees, but trees are rare commodities that become more valuable with age. In fact, every street tree brings nearly six dollars in utility for every dollar invested.

San Joses 2007 Green vision plan had the goal of planting 100,000 trees. Until 2014, the city planted forest in collaboration with Our City 12,289 trees in total which sequestered approximately 479.3 MT CO2 equivalent. The city’s goal was to have all trees planted by 2022; however, an apparent lack of resources has resulted in only 15,000-20,000 trees being planted to date.

Unfortunately, the management plan has also been found The canopy cover of San Jose has fallen nearly 2%, which equates to an area of ​​about 2.7 miles. The main findings of the document are instructive. First and foremost, the city needs to act quickly to meet the trend towards decreasing roofing. The biggest obstacle to this, besides the broken cooperation between the parties involved, is the ubiquitous money problem. The means for planting and cultivating trees are far below requirements.

Maybe we haven’t learned anything from “The Giving Tree” after all.

San José Spotlight columnist Erin Zimmerman is a Climate Reality Director for the Silicon Valley Chapter of the Climate Reality Project. Erin, a longtime environmental and political activist, holds a PhD in political science. Your column appears every third Wednesday of the month. Contact Erin at [email protected].

San Antonians say psychological well being, housing, and infrastructure amongst finest methods to spend pandemic aid cash

SAN ANTONIO – As the San Antonio City Council decides how to spend the remaining $ 199.4 million in unallocated money from the American Rescue Plan Act, parishioners have made their wishes known.

In a presentation on Thursday to the council members, the city officials presented the results of the various surveys, town hall meetings and meetings with the Small Business Advocacy Commission from the previous months. Housing, infrastructure and economic development were high on the list of immediate spending priorities for community members, while they said mental health, housing and quality childcare were their preferred long-term investments.

The SBAC listed priorities such as access to capital, such as grants or loans; Capacity building through vocational training and financial literacy; and promoting art and tourism.

The city has been allocated $ 326.9 million in ARPA dollars, half of which it has already received. The other half is expected to be received in May 2022.

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The city is allowed to use the money for a variety of purposes, including: balancing budget constraints; pay for the public health response to the pandemic; Payment of bonuses for important employees; and water, sewer and broadband infrastructure works.

The city has already committed $ 97.5 million to fill budget gaps from lost revenue over three fiscal years. Council too Set aside $ 30 million to help people in arrears with their electricity and water bills.

On Thursday, city officials recommended allocating $ 35 million to the city’s COVID-19 response, $ 35.95 million for “immediate” community needs and $ 128.45 million for “effective investment.”

POSSIBLE BONUS FOR CITY WORKERS

City officials suggested two “premium payment” options for city workers, for the several council members had asked.

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Depending on their annual income, the first plan would pay employees a bonus of up to $ 3,000 if they worked on-site in the 12 months between March 2020 and March 2021.

This plan would cost $ 10 million and cover 5,920 eligible employees.

However, City Manager Erik Walsh had employees come up with a second plan that would cover all employees – 11,760 of them – and pay up to $ 2,000, depending on their hire date and annual earnings. This plan would cost $ 14.3 million.

“But from my point of view, I think we should treat everyone equally from the point of view of employees,” said Walsh.

While not all city employees would meet the ARPA guidelines for premium payment, which are intended for those who had to work in person during the pandemic, city employees could justify this by using the “revenue replacement” category.

Some councilors called for a third option that would still cover all 11,760 employees but offer a relatively higher bonus for the 5,920 who had to come to work.

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City officials noted that none of the other major Texas cities had yet chosen to use ARPA money for bonuses.

NEXT STEPS

The city council has yet to approve the overall framework for the use of the money. This is expected to happen in a February 3rd vote after the city council made adjustments based on Thursday’s discussion.

Thereafter, the council members will assist through various sub-committees in deciding which programs to fund the ARPA money.

Copyright 2021 by KSAT – All rights reserved.

San Diego Man Sentenced for Killing Spouse in Execution-Fashion Taking pictures – NBC 7 San Diego

A man accused of killing the mother of his two children on the day she was about to deliver divorce papers to him learned of his fate in court on Monday.

Julia Maria Serrano Avila, 29, was murdered in a shooting in December 2019. Her husband, 28-year-old Fernando Avila, was arrested as the sole suspect.

Avila later pleaded guilty to first degree murder charges and firearm charges on the case.

On Monday, Avila was sentenced to 35 years in prison by a district judge in San Diego.

During the verdict on Monday, Avila apologized to Julia’s family “for having suffered so much pain” and her children “for taking their mother away from them.”

Julia Avila was shot dead on the street outside a pawn shop in City Heights, the prosecutor said, just blocks from the house where she lived with the couple’s two children.

The victim’s father described her alleged killer as lazy and not good. NBC 7’s Jackie Crea has the story.

San Diego police said at least three people watched the shooting. Violeta Marquez, who lives next to the family, told NBC 7 the first time she heard screams and called 911. Then she saw Avila fire two shots at his wife

“She was sitting on the sidewalk and I don’t know what he told her,” said Marquez. “And just like seconds he shot her again.”

Avila stayed and held her before running away on foot, Marquez said.

Witnesses said the couple quarreled prior to the shooting, which took place just blocks from Rosa Parks Elementary School and the neighborhood’s city center.

Sgt. Michelle Velovich said the argument started at her home and spread to the street and eventually outside the pawn shop, which is unrelated to the suspect or the victim.

The national domestic violence hotline is 1-800-799-7233. NBC 7’s Catherine Garcia sits down with District Attorney Summer Stephan to discuss domestic violence resources available to victims.

It was not clear how many, if any, of the shots the children witnessed, but they were in the house at the time. The children, identified by neighbors as between 8 and 12 years old, were brought to live with family members, SDPD said.

NBC 7 learned that Julia filed for divorce in November 2019. She intended to serve Avila with these papers, her father Pablo Serrano told NBC 7.

Two Luxurious SUVs With Distinctive Fashion – San Francisco Bay Occasions

By Philip Ruth –

Blocky or smooth? Outdoor or urban chic? SUVs have as many flavors as Baskin-Robbins, so you can probably find one that suits your taste.

The two we’re about to examine here are downright polar opposites in terms of niche and purpose, and both are so satisfactory to drive that you’d likely live in harmony with both of them. The decision between them depends on what you want to do with your new purchase and how you want to look. Land Rover has a long history of selling paid off-roaders, while Genesis is an emerging brand of the budget-conscious Hyundai.

I recently talked about the Genesis GV80 – the bigger brother of the $ 64,045 GV70 AWD 3.5T Sport Prestige featured here. Genesis have something interesting to do with their style as both of them were eye catchers. This GV70, in its $ 500 Adriatic Blue livery, added an unusually pleasant and masculine presence. The GV80 got curious looks, while the GV70’s attention was more focused and intense, similar to lust.

The Land Rover Defender 110 SE is typical of the brand and at first glance appears functional with many interesting shapes and design flourishes when the gaze lingers. The doors and hatch are a comfortable weight, and the rear skylights are a cool retro touch, while the floating trim panel on the B-pillars is refreshingly modern. The well-equipped 2021 tester cost less than $ 70,000.

The hot ticket for people who regularly park in parallel is the Defender 90, an arbitrary 20 of the 110 tested. But with two fewer doors it measures 180.4 inches compared to the 197.6 of the 110. That makes the Defender 90 shorter than a Civic or Corolla sedan, which greatly increases your chances of squeezing into one position. The GV70 can also be parked at 185.6 inches.

The high-300-horsepower club is a quick place, and the Genesis 375 and Defender 395 reviews translate into two-ton luxury SUVs that are consistently nimble, with muscles off the line and powerful bumps to overtake. The mileage is checked at 21 for the GV70 and 19 for the Defender.

The surroundings are correspondingly special inside. The Defender’s 14-way heated and cooled storage seats make you the commander of your domain. The instrument panel is long and wide, a contrast to the cockpit-like shapes of most modern cars, and the large windows add light whether your safari is through sunny Castro or the misty Sunset District.

The Genesis leans more towards the sports car as it feels more intimate. It has the brand-typical horizontal single-spoke wheel, and the dashboard behind it is gracefully curved and contoured. Sparkling lighted details light up the armrests and console, and there is just enough shiny stuff to make it feel like it all goes with it.

We discuss these different vehicles in the same breath because they are priced close together, and also because they are both fun. The Defender 110 was unexpectedly nimble, while the GV70’s ability to carve corners could make sports sedans obsolete. Both are worth an enthusiastic test drive.

Philip Ruth is a Castro-based automotive photojournalist and consultant with an automotive staging service.

Published on December 2, 2021

GM-backed Cruise seeks last approval for robotaxis in San Francisco

Cruise Origin driverless shuttle

cruise

General MotorsUS government-backed Cruise is seeking final California approval to begin commercializing its robotaxi fleet in San Francisco.

The self-driving car start-up announced Friday that it has filed for approval with the California Public Utilities Commission to allow autonomous vehicles to be used. It is the last of six permits required by the CPCU and California DMV to charge the public for travel.

It is unclear how long the review and approval process will take. Cruise is the first to apply for approval. Cruise CEO Dan Ammann recently said the company expects to begin commercialization as early as next year, pending regulatory approval.

If approved, Cruise could be the first to operate a taxi fleet without human drivers. alphabet-supported Waymo has also received approval from California DMV to bill Robotaxi rides, but their approval still requires a “safety driver” in the vehicle in the event of a problem.

The latest permit allows Cruise vehicles to operate on public roads in certain parts of San Francisco between 10:00 PM and 6:00 AM, even in light rain or fog. However, according to the DMV, they must not exceed 30 miles per hour.

Commercializing autonomous vehicles has been far more difficult than many predicted a few years ago, but Waymo and Cruise are considered two of the frontrunners.

Cruise was scheduled to launch a public transportation service in San Francisco in 2019. The enterprise delayed these plans this year to conduct further testing and obtain necessary regulatory approvals.

General Motors Cruise test vehicles

Source: General Motors

Cruise received DMV approval for self-driving vehicles for the first time in June 2015. Since then, the company has slowly expanded its test sites and expanded its fleet to hundreds of autonomous vehicles, while also obtaining additional permits.

Cruise’s current fleet of vehicles includes Chevrolet Bolt EVs that are retrofitted with self-driving vehicle software and additional technologies such as cameras, radar and lidar that enable vehicles to “see” their surroundings.

The next fleet of vehicles is expected to consist of the Cruise Origin, a rectangular shuttle-like vehicle designed exclusively as an autonomous vehicle. Ammann said earlier this year that GM is expected to begin producing the Origin for Cruise early 2023.

GM acquired Cruise in 2016. Since then, it has been like investors Honda engine, Softbank Vision Fund and, more recently, too Walmart and Microsoft.

UC San Diego Well being Earns Excessive High quality Marks, Saves Medicare Cash

The UC San Diego Health Accountable Care Network improved the care of more than 32,000 Medicare beneficiaries in San Diego, Riverside, and Imperial Counties, and saved Medicare nearly $ 7 million by leveraging advanced population health technologies and processes to help Beat quality and cost targets in 2020 based on recently released performance data from the federal agency that administers Medicare.

UC San Diego’s Health Accountable Care Network achieved a 97 percent quality rating on performance measurements ranging from preventive health checks to the use of computerized health records to preventing avoidable hospital stays, Medicare data shows.

Parag Agnihotri, MD, Chief Medical Officer, UC San Diego Health Accountable Care Network.

“Realizing shared savings working with our network of community providers means we can reinvest those dollars in care coordination, information technology, and other care improvements to further improve quality and reduce costs,” said Parag Agnihotri, MD, Chief Medical Officer, UC San Diego Health Accountable Care Network.

“Our success in the Accountable Care Organization (ACO) program is another achievement in addition to our national and regional awards and rankings,” said Duncan Campbell, chief operating officer of the UC San Diego Health Accountable Care Network. “Our success is driven by our incredible providers who work closely with their patients to ensure smooth transitions from the clinic to the hospital, home – or, if necessary, a nursing home.”

The ACO is also focused on increasing the number of Medicare beneficiaries who take advantage of annual wellness visits, including recommended checkups and preventative measures. Integrating performance data into our network enables providers to share best practices and improve care coordination to avoid health problems and repeated hospitalizations.

Duncan Campbell, Chief Operating Officer, UC San Diego Health Accountable Care Network.

As a market-based solution to fragmented and costly care, responsible care organizations enable local doctors, hospitals and other providers to work together and take responsibility for improving quality, improving the patient experience and making care affordable. The Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP) creates incentives for ACOs to invest in public health initiatives by enabling them to participate in savings that they generate after reaching defined quality and cost targets.

In 2020, 517 ACOs serving over 11 million beneficiaries nationwide participated in the MSSP and achieved gross savings of $ 1 billion based on the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services’ methodology for setting financial benchmarks.

“Medicare ACO’s joint austerity program is the country’s largest value-based payment model and a critical tool in moving the healthcare system to better value,” said Agnihotri.

A fact sheet with more information on MSSP ACOs is available online along with other resources.

UC San Diego Health Accountable Care Network includes Perlman Medical Offices, San Diego Sports Medicine, North Coast Family Medicine, Rancho Family Medical Group, Imperial Valley Family Care, and dozens of other groups serving San Diego, Riverside, and Imperial Counties.

UC San Diego Health is the only academic health care system in the San Diego area, providing cutting-edge care in patient care, biomedical research, education, and community service. Our facilities include two university hospitals, a National Cancer Institute designated Comprehensive Cancer Center, the Shiley Eye Institute, the Sulpizio Cardiovascular Center, and several outpatient departments. UC San Diego Medical Center in Hillcrest is a designated Level I trauma center and has the county’s only burn center.

New Orleans-Impressed Restaurant in San Diego Goals to Increase Cash for Hurricane Ida Reduction – NBC 7 San Diego

San Diego is a long way from Louisiana, but a Hillcrest restaurant keeps the New Orleans community up for victims through a fundraiser Hurricane Ida.

NOLA On 5. – located at 3683 5th Ave., south of Pennsylvania Avenue – is working with the American Red Cross Thursday to raise funds for Ida relief efforts. From September 2nd to 5th, daily from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m., the restaurant will donate 50% of sales of its New Orleans Comfort Food menu to the American red cross.

A Hurricane Katrina survivor who now lives in San Diego recalls the storm and worries about the aftermath of Hurricane Ida. Allie Raffa from NBC 7 reports.

You see, the co-owner of the New Orleans-inspired restaurant – Andrew Boyer – is a retired New Orleans resident and wants to do what he can to help after Ida’s devastation.

“Our thoughts go with those affected by Ida and the entire Louisiana community,” said a message posted on Restaurant Instagram feed.

Hurricane Ida left a lot of damage in Lafourche Parish, Louisiana – devastating buildings and roads.

On Saturday, a local chapter of Louisiana State University alumni will participate in the restaurant’s fundraiser; the alumni will also collect money for Ida aid during the LSU vs. UCLA soccer game from 5:30 p.m.

NOLA On 5th specializes in Louisiana dishes such as catfish, po’boys, Mediterranean style lobster and chicken. Jambalaya, Gumbo, red beans, and rice are also on the menu.

Ida swept through Louisiana on Sunday, leaving New Orleans without power.

To learn more about how to donate directly through the American Red Cross to Hurricane Ida relief efforts, Click here.

Hurricane Ida: What You Should Know

Hurricane Ida landed on August 29th – the 16th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina. A few days later hundreds of thousands of Louisians were braising with no electricity, no tap water and little gasoline.

Ida was the fifth strongest hurricane hit the US and its devastation continues to be widespread. More than 1 million Homes and businesses in Louisiana and Mississippi were left without power. At some point New Orleans fell into complete darkness.

The death toll rose dramatically through Thursday as remains of the Hurricane Ida devastated the northeastern United States with record-breaking rains and floods.

Police said nine people died in New York City and 14 confirmed deaths in New Jersey. Check out the latest updates on Ida-related deaths Here.

In the meantime, President Joe Biden will visit Louisiana on Friday to assess the aftermath and speak to local and state leaders.

On Thursday, the president spoke about his administration’s efforts to protect the areas hit by Hurricane Ida (as well as those affected by Caldor fire in the Sierra Nevada near Lake Tahoe).

“We’re all sticking together,” said Bide. “The nation is here to help.”

President Joe Biden described his administration’s efforts to provide federal aid to competing climate crises in the United States, including historic floods from Hurricane Ida in the southern and eastern states and the devastating Caldor Fire in Sierra Nevada. “We’re all in the same boat. The nation is here to help.”

For subscribers: Proposal goals to spend tens of millions in San Diego arts cash extra broadly, extra pretty

San Diego officials are proposing big changes to the way the city spends millions in art funding after a recent equity assessment showed low-income neighborhoods earn far less than Balboa Park, downtown, and La Jolla.

The proposal would increase eligibility in several ways, make the process more transparent and ease the audit requirements for small organizations. It would also remove the city’s “refund only” policy so that some art events could be funded upfront.

Eligibility would extend beyond nonprofits to individual artists and campaigns targeting goals such as promoting the inclusion of underrepresented groups.

City officials said the main goal of the revised guidelines is to expand the preservation of city arts funding and strengthen the city’s creative industries by better encouraging the growth of young artists and arts organizations.

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“There are so many young and new organizations out there eager to get funding to get started,” said Theresa Kosen, co-chair of the San Diego Regional Arts and Culture Coalition. “It will provide impact and justice.”

Many small organizations do not apply for city funding because they cannot afford to meet city requirements for extensive audits, or because they do not have enough capital to prepay an event and then spend months on city reimbursement wait .

The proposal would also cut the time a recipient must have been or worked in the arts to qualify for a grant from three to two years, which city officials say is more in line with other government agencies that support the arts.

Heads of local arts organizations praise the proposed changes, which the city council is expected to consider this fall.

Thus, by giving money to more groups and shifting some of the money to smaller groups, the proposal would reduce funding for many other arts organizations, most likely larger and long-standing groups that benefit from the existing system.

That’s because the proposal doesn’t include a general increase in city arts funding, which is typically anywhere from $ 8 million to $ 12 million annually.

However, there doesn’t seem to be an immediate backlash from the city’s most prominent arts organizations.

Peter Comiskey, Executive Director of the Balboa Park Cultural Partnership with 26 organizations, praised the changes as an important step in improving opportunities for those who currently do not have access to city funds.

One way the proposal would likely increase the size of the funding pool is to ban organizations outside of the city from receiving city grants for day-to-day operations.

That change would immediately affect half a dozen arts organizations in Chula Vista, Lemon Grove, and Poway that are receiving money from San Diego for showing more than half of the people attending their events live in San Diego.

These groups could still apply for grants to fund events, but those events would have to be within the city of San Diego. And they could no longer apply for money for ongoing operations.

The proposed revisions come in response to an equity assessment that showed Balboa Park and downtown received nearly 70 percent of the $ 11.4 million the city donated to arts organizations in both fiscal years 2019 and 2020.

The analysis showed that District 3, which includes Balboa Park, downtown, and the surrounding areas, received more than 200 times as much annual arts funding as District 8, which includes San Ysidro and Barrio Logan.

But the differences go beyond that.

Districts 1 and 2 – which are more affluent and ethnically less diverse than most other parts of the city – also received far more than any other place except District 3.

District 1, which includes La Jolla and its numerous theater and arts programs, received $ 1.42 million in fiscal year 2019 and $ 1.22 million in fiscal year 2020. District 2, which includes the Liberty Station arts district, received just over $ 1 million in fiscal 2019 and $ 904,000 in fiscal 2020.

If the art funding of districts 1, 2 and 3 for the 2020 financial year is added together, it makes up 87.3 percent of the total city art funding. In the 2019 financial year, this proportion was even higher at 91.4 percent.

Meanwhile, District 8 received $ 35,000 in fiscal 2020 and $ 25,000 in fiscal 2019. District 4, which includes much of southeastern San Diego, received $ 130,000 in fiscal 2020 and US $ 145,000 in fiscal 2019 -Dollar.

Almost all cities divert significant resources to large venues such as the San Diego Civic Theater and Balboa Park institutions as they are designed to serve an entire region. However, some critics question the possibility that San Diego is spending too much money on these types of venues.

City council member Vivian Moreno, who represents District 8, is one of those critics. Last spring, she called equity valuation a call to action.

Moreno this week praised the proposed revisions made by the city’s Arts and Culture Commission after many months of analyzing and collecting community feedback.

“This will make it easier for arts organizations of all sizes to benefit from city funding,” Moreno said Wednesday during a meeting of the council’s economic development committee. “We are taking the necessary steps to support inclusive growth and development.”

Councilor Sean Elo-Rivera said the proposal could be a model for how San Diego officials can change city policies to increase equity in other areas.

“A world-class city requires a world-class art community, and I think we have what it takes here,” said Elo-Rivera. “It’s about giving this talent the opportunity to breathe and realize its potential. That is definitely a step in that direction. “

Bea Zamora Aguilar, director of an Aztec dance group in Barrio Logan, said this week that she was particularly optimistic about the proposal to soften audit requirements and abolish the exclusive reimbursement policy.

She said most small arts organizations couldn’t afford a full audit. When making the refund, she found that she was still waiting for a $ 5,000 scholarship she had received for a photo exhibition that had already opened and closed.

Aguilar said she would have to carefully consider the proposal before she could declare her full support, but was optimistic.

“It sounds like it really is a step in the right direction,” she said. “As a small business, it is difficult to get visibility into your programming, so we all need the help.”

For audit organizations receiving grants, the proposal would create a medium level of disclosure. Large organizations receiving larger grants would still have to conduct audits. But groups with operating budgets less than $ 2 million and receiving grants of $ 75,000 or less could file a less stringent financial audit instead of an audit.

If the council approves the policy changes this fall, they will be used for arts grants in the new city budget, which will be approved next June.

COVID rental help cash nonetheless accessible in San Diego

The authorities expect an increase in requests as the eviction moratorium expires.

SAN DIEGO COUNTY, California – A state eviction moratorium is set to expire this weekend, but the state eviction moratorium in California will last at least two months.

COVID Rental Assistance Allowance continues to be available for qualified applicants in San Diego County.

“Help is there. It is available. We encourage people to apply, ”said Jose Dorado, senior management analyst for the City of Chula Vista.

If you are behind with your rental payments, go to first Erapsandiego.org There you can enter your address to find out where to apply for rental assistance.

“People need to know that they can apply. So if they are having trouble paying their rent, be it overdue rent or future rent, they can apply for this rent support, ”said Dorado.

Three agencies cover all of San Diego County when it comes to rental assistance.

Chula Vista is one area, the second is the city of San Diego and the rest is covered by San Diego County.

The money is available to low-income applicants, but if you’ve recently lost your job there is a chance that you could qualify as last month’s income level can be calculated.

“Suppose you were recently laid off, or you had a reduction in hours, or perhaps you had a health problem. Then you could use your income from the last 30 days to qualify for this program, ”said Dorado.

The COVID rental support now covers 100 percent of past and future rent through April 2020.

The money goes to the landlord and either the tenant or the landlord can submit an application.

“A lot of people are happy that they can focus on other responsibilities they have towards their families rather than how they pay their rent or whether they are evicted,” Dorado said.

Even if you live in a government home, you can still apply for rental assistance in San Diego County, according to Dorado.

CONNECTED TO WATCH: Applications open for San Diego County’s Rental Assistance Program (March 2021)

Trend-Aware: Designer Shamani Corridor Brings Distinctive, Classic-Impressed Fashion to San Clemente

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By Norb Garrett

“If you know better, do better.”

For vintage fashion designer Shamani Hall, 34, this phrase not only explains her current state of mind, but also defines her personality and purpose in life. Born in Alaska (her name is Inuit), raised outside of Seattle, trained in Los Angeles and New York at FIDM (Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising) and FIT (Fashion Institute of Technology) respectively, Hall cut into fashion industry that was in Los Angeles works. It was in LA that she found her own style and in 2007 teamed up with a friend to launch a brand that attracted LA’s celebrity sets, including influencers like the Kardashians. After 10 years the “brand has run its course” and a change of scenery was announced. She decided to start a new design company when a friend asked her to help open a new business in Costa Rica, and Hall seized the opportunity.

“As I was [in Costa Rica], I could have room to dive deeper and really think about what I want to do with my life and my career, ”said Hall, who recently became a vegan and is committed to a more meaningful life through conscious consumption. “If it feels right, I’ll do it.”

Hall returned to LA in 2020 when COVID imposed lockdowns across the state, leaving her alone in her LA apartment to work on her own brand. “I was forced to focus on my own thing,” she says. “I even started filming myself with the product; During COVID you had to be resourceful. ”Her limited edition vintage clothing line sold out online, but she felt trapped in LA and needed a change. San Clemente was just the elixir.

“My ex-boyfriend was surfing Trestles the whole time and we always loved coming here,” she said. “I always felt a great atmosphere here and knew that one day I would end up in San Clemente.”

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