Virginia to loosen guidelines on gatherings, leisure venues

Virginia Governor Ralph Northam said Tuesday that the state would soon ease some coronavirus-related restrictions on social gatherings and entertainment venues.

As of April 1, Northam said, social gatherings such as weddings can have up to 50 people indoors. Outdoor gatherings can accommodate up to 100 people.

Indoor entertainment venues can be operated up to 30% or with up to 500 people. Outdoor venues can operate at 30% capacity with no limit to the actual number of people.

For example, a baseball stadium with 9,500 fans can seat around 3,000 spectators. That will give people space for social distancing, Northam said.

Indoor recreational sports events can have 100 people per field or 30% capacity. For outdoor events, 500 people can be accommodated per field or 30% of the capacity.

“These are measured changes,” said the Democratic governor at a press conference. “We still have a strict collection limit and a universal mask mandate, as well as capacity restrictions both indoors and outdoors.”

Social gatherings in the state are currently limited to 10 people indoors and 25 people outdoors. Some in the wedding business say easing the limits for 50 people indoors and 100 people outdoors might still be too restrictive.

Virginia Beach hotel company Gold Key / PHR has canceled 100 weddings since the pandemic began and coronavirus restrictions were put in place, CEO Bruce Thompson said.

“It’s not helping us very much,” said Thompson, whose company operates places like the historic Cavalier Hotel on the Atlantic Ocean. He said the company has ballrooms of various sizes that could safely accommodate more guests and enable social distancing.

“I am not saying that the restrictions are unnecessary or appropriate. I just think they’re not practical, “Thompson said.” I have a 10,000 square foot ballroom. I can put 100 people in – and that’s 100 square meters per person. I would just like to see it more focused on the real risk in different places. “

Thompson added that there is a fine line between weddings and entertainment events like a concert.

Northam previously said that weddings often have groups of people hugging, dancing, and drinking in close proximity.

“(A) All of the things we know to spread the virus,” Northam said during a March 9 press conference. “We really tried to follow the science and the data.”

Northam said Tuesday that the state is starting to relax guidelines as the number of new coronavirus cases hit a bee plateau while more people are being vaccinated.

Almost one in four Virginians has received at least one shot of the vaccine, Northam said. That’s more than 2 million people. At the same time, more than 1.1 million people in the state have been fully vaccinated, according to the Virginia Department of Health website.

More than 1,200 new coronavirus cases were reported in the state on Tuesday. However, according to the Virginia Department of Virginia website, this is well below the nearly 10,000 cases reported on January 17th after the holiday season.

Guidelines on state use of stimulus cash prompts GOP complaints, lawsuit – WISH-TV | Indianapolis Information | Indiana Climate

(CNN) – Republican officials are in the arms over one of the conditions tied to the $ 350 billion state and local aid included in the Democrats’ massive aid package passed last week.

The restriction, added by the Senate Democrats, prompted the Ohio Attorney General to file a lawsuit Wednesday and his GOP colleagues to write an angry letter to Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen.

There is a $ 1.9 trillion provision in the stimulus bill that could limit states’ ability to cut taxes. It is said that governments cannot use the funds “either directly or indirectly” to offset a decrease in net tax revenue resulting from changes such as tax cuts, discounts, deductions, credits or delays in tax increases or the introduction of a tax.

The rule can apply until 2024. This is the deadline by which states can obtain their aid.

The Treasury Department said Thursday that the aid is not intended for tax cuts, but that states are free to use other means to lower taxes.

Funding from state and local governments was one of the most controversial measures in the congressional aid agreements. Many states and communities suffered a decline in tax revenues due to the pandemic – although for some the declines were not as large as originally feared.

Democrats attempted to top up the $ 150 billion pot envisaged in the stimulus agreement passed a year ago, but Republicans successfully blocked it while controlling the Senate in 2020.

President Joe Biden’s package, which didn’t get GOP votes, sends more support, but it also includes the tax cut provision and one that bans states from pouring the money into their pension funds, which Republican lawmakers backed.

Entitlement to an unconstitutional tax mandate

Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost filed an injunction with the US District Court in South Ohio to prevent the enforcement of what he called the “tax mandate”. He said it was unconstitutional and exceeded the powers of Congress.

The state that expects to receive Aid of around $ 5.5 billionsuffered a loss of $ 1.1 billion in tax revenue for fiscal 2020 the movement.

“The tax mandate thus gives states a choice: they can either dispose of the urgently needed federal funds or their sovereign authority to determine state tax policy. But they can’t have both, ”the application says. “In our current economic crisis, that’s not an option at all. It’s a metaphorical “gun to the head”. “

Meanwhile, a coalition of 21 Republican attorneys general – led by Georgia, Arizona and West Virginia – wrote to Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen on Tuesday expressing concerns about the provision, particularly the ban on “indirectly offsetting” tax cuts and the list of prohibited measures.

The letter contained a number of tax measures that states are currently considering that officials fear may violate the relief law. These include increasing the standard deduction in Georgia, introducing tax credits in Indiana, and lowering income taxes in Montana.

The attorney general asked Yellen to confirm that the aid package will at most prevent states from expressly using the funds for direct tax cuts rather than for the purposes listed.

What states can do, according to the Treasury

The Treasury Department said the law does not prevent states from lowering taxes or from having to repay their aid if they do.

“In other words, states are free to make policy decisions to cut taxes – they simply cannot use the pandemic aid money to pay for those tax cuts,” an agency spokesman said.

Still, the Biden administration made it clear earlier this week that the aid is intended to deter states from laying off more workers – especially key workers. State and local governments have shed nearly 1.4 million jobs in the past 12 months.

“The original purpose of the state and local funding was to keep and employ police officers, firefighters and other key employees in the workplace, and it was not intended to cut taxes,” White House press secretary Jen Psaki said in a Press conference on Monday.

Yost was not satisfied with the Treasury Department’s answer.

“It’s like saying,” But you can keep your wallet, the choice is yours, “right after the robber said” your wallet or your life, “” the attorney general said Thursday.

Court docket guidelines in opposition to artist Peter Max over broken works | Leisure

A New Jersey appeals court ruled Thursday against famous pop artist Peter Max in a dispute over his million dollar works that were damaged in a warehouse during Superstorm Sandy.

German-born Max, whose signature psychedelic drawings have largely been reproduced on posters and postage stamps and exhibited in museums since the 1960s, has claimed that an arbitrator’s insurance price of $ 48 million is too low.

Thousands of his paintings, posters, and other works were damaged in a warehouse in Lyndhurst, northern New Jersey, when Superstorm Sandy entered the area in late October 2012.

When Max and his insurers, Great American Security and Lloyds, couldn’t agree on the cost of the damage, a former New Jersey Supreme Court Justice was hired to settle the dispute.

Max and his affiliates claim that the judiciary miscalculated the value of the damaged works by offering a discount on some entire categories, including posters.

A lower court judge had ruled that the ratings were reasonable and that Max’s approach “overlooked the possibility that many of the items had not been sold in the past and that the entire work was likely not to be sold at those prices in the future” on Thursday’s judgment.

The appellate court also wrote in its decision that it did not have jurisdiction and left the decision of the lower court undisturbed.

Nevada adjusts distance guidelines, Las Vegas exhibits to return | Leisure

LAS VEGAS (AP) – Republican Governor Steve Sisolak has signed an emergency decree adjusting the minimum distance between performers and viewers who previously questioned the return of productions in Las Vegas.

The tourist destination built and known for oversize bright lights, big crowdsAfter the March pandemic, the store slowly reopened. Businesses, especially on the Strip, have struggled with limited air travel, a lack of midweek convention business, and a lack of arena events and entertainment.

Previously, the actors had to keep a distance of 7.6 meters between the viewers as a precaution against the corona virus. However, some smaller venues were unable to accommodate this limitation.

Sisolak signed the new emergency policy on Friday, updating the minimum separation distance to 1.8 meters (six feet) when the performers are wearing masks and 3.6 meters (12 feet) when the performers are exposed.

The order is effective immediately and applies to all live entertainment and performances at public gatherings and events of all sizes.

“This is amazing news,” said Angela Stabile, co-founder of Stabile Productions, Inc., which has hosted three different shows at Harrah’s Las Vegas Hotel and Casino and the Flamingo Las Vegas Hotel & Casino. “In the beginning it was an extreme guideline. This is another step in the right direction. “

Meredith Company’s REAL SIMPLE To Launch Weekly “Cash Confidential” Podcast and “The New Guidelines of Retirement” Digital Occasion Sequence in Conjunction With Constancy Investments®

NEW YORKFeb. 22, 2021 / PRNewswire / – Meredith Corporation (NYSE: MDP) REALLY SIMPLE, the ultimate resource for a modern woman’s busy life, today announced the launch of its weekly Money Confidential. Podcast on March 1st and the virtual series of events “The New Rules of Retirement” on March 25th. Sponsored by Fidelity Investments®, a leader in financial planning and advisory, the offerings are designed to help women of all ages manage the retirement planning process and share actionable information and achievable solutions to their long-term and short-term financial goals.

“2020 has been a difficult year for our readers in every way, including financially, so we’re excited to partner with Fidelity Investments to have honest conversations and practical solutions to personal finance,” he says Liz Vaccariello, REALLY SIMPLE editor-in-chief. “We’re committed to eliminating the financial concerns and burdens of our audiences by creating a safe space to talk about money – and offer solutions that work.”

REAL SIMPLE’s 12-part “Money Confidential” Podcast will be available on all podcast platforms including Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Play, Stitcher, and TuneIn. host Stefanie O’Connell Rodriguez, a nationally recognized millennial money expert and author of The Broke and Beautiful, will provide tips and guidance on how to invest beyond a 401 (k), reduce the pressures of student debt, save for the future, and address the stress of money and relationships mix.

Organized by Brandi Broxson, REAL SIMPLE Features Editor, “The New Rules of Retirement” series of events will introduce Fidelity Senior Vice President, Retirement and Cash Management Melissa Ridolfi, Financial Hype Woman and Influencer Berna Anat and other personal finance experts. A second event is planned with the aim of providing women with a game plan and helping them learn the new rules for retirement September 2021.

“Today we see more women than ever struggling to learn about planning their futures and reducing the financial burden so many of us are feeling today,” he said Melissa Ridolfi, Senior Vice President of Fidelity Investments. “How loyalty We’re celebrating Women’s History Month with a special focus on helping women improve their financial wellbeing. We love to speak to REAL SIMPLE to really talk about saving and investing and taking simple steps to make sure your money is harder to hit with your age goals. ”

About REAL SIMPLE
REAL SIMPLE makes life easier and more meaningful for today’s busy woman, offering inspiring ideas and practical solutions to make her life easier. REAL SIMPLE understands the modern woman and creates a positive, supportive community where women can connect and share their ideas. REAL SIMPLE reaches an audience of nearly 14 million every month through print and digital. consequences REALLY SIMPLE on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and Instagram.

About Fidelity Investments
Fidelity’s mission is to create better future prospects and achieve better results for the customers and companies we serve. With assets under management by $ 9.8 trillionincluding the discretion of $ 3.8 trillion from December 31, 2020We focus on serving the unique needs of a wide variety of customers: helping more than 35 million people invest their own savings, 22,000 companies administering employee benefit programs, and providing investment and technology solutions to more than 13,500 institutions to invest theirs Own customers’ money. Fidelity has been privately owned for more than 70 years and employs more than 47,000 people who are focused on the long-term success of our customers. For more information visit https://www.fidelity.com/about-fidelity/our-company. For more information on Fidelity’s Women Talk Money virtual pop-up event to celebrate Women’s History Month, please visit www.fidelity.com/gamechangers.

SOURCE Meredith Corporation

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Sisterhood guidelines in Peacock’s first Spanish-language collection | Leisure




FILE – Kate del Castillo attends NBC 2019/20 Upfront in New York on May 13, 2019. The Miami-based “Armas de Mujer” is produced in eight episodes for the Peacock streaming service. The premiere date will be announced.




FILE – Kate del Castillo arrives in Los Angeles for the Latin American Music Awards on October 26, 2017. The Miami-based “Armas de Mujer” is produced in eight episodes for the Peacock streaming service. The premiere date has not yet been announced.




Sisterhood rules in Peacock's first Spanish-language series

FILE – Roselyn Sanchez attends Wango Tango on June 1, 2019 in Carson, California. Miami-based “Armas de Mujer” will be produced in eight episodes for the Peacock streaming service. The premiere date will be announced.

TV writer by LYNN ELBER AP

LOS ANGELES (AP) – Sisterhood and survival are the themes of a dark comedy coming to Peacock, a first step into Spanish-speaking cuisine developed for the streaming service.

The Miami-based “Armas de Mujer”, which is translated as “women’s weapons” in English, is also a switch for its stars, including Kate del Castillo from the drama series “La Reina del Sur”.

“I am very happy to be doing this amazing genre that I am unfamiliar with as an actress,” said del Castillo on Wednesday. “Actually, in Latin America, we weren’t used to doing that kind of dark humor.”

Eight episodes of the series are in production, including Roselyn Sánchez (“Devious Maids”, “Grand Hotel”) and Sylvia Sáenz and Jeimy Osorio, who appeared together in “Betty en NY”. A premiere date has not yet been set.

The characters’ affluent lives are changed after their husbands are arrested for connections to the same crime cartel, be it as an accountant, assassin or top boss.

When asked how they work together, the women are looking for a way to feed themselves and their families in style – a bonding exercise that reflects their own relationship on set.

There is a tendency to play women off against each other as competitors, said Sáenz, calling this a sharp contrast to reality.

Cowl that purple nostril! Circus pageant adapts to virus guidelines | Leisure




The dancers from left to right, Joaquin Medina Caligari from Uruguay, Tasha Petersen from Argentina, Valentino Martinetti from Argentina, Marius Fouilland from France and Lucille Chalopin from Paris from the Eolienne company play “Le Lac des Cygnes” by Florence Caillon, based on Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake during BIAC, International Circus Arts Biennale, in Marseille, South of France, Thursday February 4, 2021. The fourth edition of the Global Circus Biennale shows how the performing arts can flourish between the cracks, celebrating the death defying and spine-stretching arts who are behind the legendary spectacle.




The French tightrope walker Tatiana-Mosio Bongoga presents her documentary about her performance on a 400-meter tightrope walker, which was hung at a height of 40 meters without protection over the Vltava River in Prague in 2019 during the BIAC, International Circus Art Biennale, in Marseille, southern France, Wednesday February 3, 2021.




Cover that red nose!  The circus festival adapts to the virus rules

The actors Pauline Barboux and Jeanne Ragu from the Libertivore Company present their show “Ether” directed by Fanny Soriano during the BIAC, International Circus Arts Biennale, in Marseille, south of France, Wednesday 3rd February 2021. It was a tough year for the performing arts in most countries, with virus bans canceling shows and formwork locations. But the world’s best circus festival has found a way to thrive between the cracks of the rules – even without the large crowds that would normally have been around.




Cover that red nose!  The circus festival adapts to the virus rules

Dancers play “Parallèle 26”, a creation by the French choreographer Sylvie Guillermin with the circus company Archaos, which shows student acrobats and dancers in the Theater de La Criee during the BIAC, International Circus Arts Biennale, in Marseille, southern France, on Friday, February 5th , 2021. The fourth edition of the Global Circus Biennale shows how the performing arts thrive among the cracks, celebrating the death defying and spine-stretching arts that are behind the legendary spectacle.




Cover that red nose!  The circus festival adapts to the virus rules

Sylvie Guillermin, choreographer of “Parallèle 26”, a creation by the Archaos circus company with student acrobats and dancers, prepares the stage in the Theater de La Criee during the BIAC, International Circus Arts Biennale, in Marseille, southern France, Friday February. 5, 2021. The fourth edition of the Global Circus Biennale shows how the performing arts thrive between the cracks, celebrating the death defying and spine stretching arts that are behind the legendary spectacle.




Cover that red nose!  The circus festival adapts to the virus rules

Sylvie Guillermin, choreographer of “Parallèle 26”, a creation by the Archaos circus company with student acrobats and dancers, prepares the stage in the Theater de La Criee during the BIAC, International Circus Arts Biennale, in Marseille, southern France, Friday February. 5, 2021. It’s been a tough year for the performing arts in most countries. Virus locks have canceled shows and shuttering locations. But the world’s best circus festival has found a way to thrive between the cracks of the rules – even without the large crowds that would normally have been around.




Cover that red nose!  The circus festival adapts to the virus rules

The dancers from left to right, Tasha Petersen from Argentina, Lucille Chalopin from Paris, Marius Fouilland from France and Joaquin Medina Caligari from Uruguay from the Eolienne company play “Le Lac des Cygnes” by Florence Caillon on the basis of Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake the BIAC, International circus arts biennial, in Marseille, south of France, Thursday 4th February 2021.




Cover that red nose!  The circus festival adapts to the virus rules

The dancers Tasha Petersen from Argentina (above) and Joaquin Medina Caligari from Uruguay from the Eolienne company prepare for the performance of “Le Lac des Cygnes” by Florence Caillon based on Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake during the BIAC, International Circus Arts Biennale, in Marseille, before. South of France, Thursday February 4, 2021.




Cover that red nose!  The circus festival adapts to the virus rules

The dancer Marius Fouilland from France of the Eolienne company prepares before the presentation of “Le Lac des Cygnes” by Florence Caillon on Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake during the BIAC, International Circus Arts Biennale, in Marseille, southern France, on Thursday, February 4th , based on 2021.




Cover that red nose!  The circus festival adapts to the virus rules

The backstage room at The Docks Des Suds is empty with a plaque reading “Emergency Exit” during the BIAC, International Circus Art Biennale, in Marseille, southern France, Thursday, February 4, 2021. The fourth edition of the Global Die Circus Biennale demonstrates how the performing arts can thrive between the rifts, and celebrates the death defying and spine-stretching arts that are behind the legendary spectacle.




Cover that red nose!  The circus festival adapts to the virus rules

The Brazilian performer Alice Rende prepares for the performance of “Passages”, a contortionism creation in a space delimited by a Plexiglas box during the BIAC, International Circus Arts Biennale, in Marseille, southern France, Thursday, February 4, 2021. The Die fourth edition of the global Circus Biennale shows how the performing arts thrive among the cracks, celebrating the death defying and spine-stretching arts that are behind the legendary spectacle.




Cover that red nose!  The circus festival adapts to the virus rules

A banner announces the BIAC, International Circus Arts Biennale, which will take place behind closed doors at the Archaos Circus Compagnie Theater in Marseille, southern France, on Thursday, February 4th, 2021. The fourth edition of the global Circus Biennale shows how the performing arts have a way of thriving between the cracks and celebrating the death defying and spine-stretching arts that are behind the legendary spectacle.




Cover that red nose!  The circus festival adapts to the virus rules

The Brazilian performer Alice Rende prepares for the performance of “Passages”, a contortionism creation in a space delimited by a Plexiglas box during the BIAC, International Circus Arts Biennale, in Marseille, southern France, Thursday, February 4, 2021. The Die fourth edition of the global Circus Biennale shows how the performing arts thrive among the cracks, celebrating the death defying and spine-stretching arts that are behind the legendary spectacle.




Cover that red nose!  The circus festival adapts to the virus rules

The Brazilian performer Alice Rende stretches before the performance of “Passages”, a contortionism creation in a room delimited by a Plexiglas box during the BIAC, International Circus Arts Biennale, in Marseille, southern France, Thursday, February 4, 2021.




Cover that red nose!  The circus festival adapts to the virus rules

The acrobats Gioia Zanaboni from Italy (above) and Anja Eberhart from Switzerland from the Zania company practice outside in a public park because their training room is closed before they present their acrobatic show “Never Retiring” during the BIAC, International Circus Arts Biennale. in Marseille, southern France, Thursday February 4, 2021.




Cover that red nose!  The circus festival adapts to the virus rules

Performers present “Periple 2021”, a six-month non-stop circus performance organized by the six jugglers that make up the Protocole collective, during an event only for professionals, during the BIAC, International Circus Arts Biennale, on Friday in Marseille, southern France , insists, February 5, 2021. It’s been a tough year for the performing arts in most countries. Virus locks have canceled shows and shuttering locations. But the world’s best circus festival has found a way to thrive among the cracks of the rules – even without the large crowds that would normally have been there.




Cover that red nose!  The circus festival adapts to the virus rules

Yoann Bourgeois, French choreographer and co-director of the National Choreographic Center of Grenoble, takes part in interviews during the BIAC, International Circus Arts Biennale, in Marseille, southern France, on Wednesday February 3, 2021.




Cover that red nose!  The circus festival adapts to the virus rules

The cultural concert hall at Docks Des Suds, which was closed for a year with a badge that reads “Emergency Exit” during the BIAC, International Circus Arts Biennale, in Marseille, South of France, Thursday February 4, 2021 A tough year for the performing Arts in most countries where virus bans cancel shows and shuttering locations. But the world’s best circus festival, the Circus Biennale, has found a way to thrive between the cracks of the rules – even without the large crowds that would normally have been there.




Cover that red nose!  The circus festival adapts to the virus rules

Brazilian performer Alice Rende warms up before performing “Passages”, a contortionism creation in a space delimited by a Plexiglas box during the BIAC, International Circus Arts Biennale, in Marseille, southern France, Thursday February 4, 2021. The fourth Edition of the global Circus Biennale shows how the performing arts thrive among the cracks, celebrating the death defying and spine-stretching arts that are behind the legendary spectacle.




Cover that red nose!  The circus festival adapts to the virus rules

The dancer Lucille Chalopin from Paris from the Eolienne company stretches before the performance of “Le Lac des Cygnes” by Florence Caillon, based on Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake, during the BIAC, International Circus Arts Biennale, in Marseille, southern France, Thursday, February. 4, 2021. The fourth edition of the Global Circus Biennale shows how the performing arts thrive among the cracks, celebrating the death defying and spine stretching arts that are behind the legendary spectacle.




Cover that red nose!  The circus festival adapts to the virus rules

The actors Pauline Barboux and Jeanne Ragu from the company Libertivore present their show “Ether” directed by Fanny Soriano during the BIAC, International Circus Arts Biennale, in Marseille, southern France, on Wednesday, February 3, 2021.

BY THOMAS ADAMSON and DANIEL COLE

MARSEILLE, France (AP) – It’s been a tough year for the performing arts in most countries. Virus locks have canceled shows and shuttering locations.

But the world’s best circus festival has found a way to thrive between the cracks of the rules – even without the large crowds that would normally have been around.

The fourth edition of the Circus Biennale (BIAC), which takes place every two years in the south of France and ends on Saturday in the Mediterranean port city of Marseille, celebrates the anti-injury and spine-stretching arts that fuel the famous spectacle.

More than 110,000 people attended the last BIAC in 2019. This year it had up to 2,000 visitors, all professionals who work in the circus or want to buy shows.

This, too, is proof of the determination and determination of the organizers who have skilfully adapted their festival to the rules and regulations of the French authorities.

“We started with a plan A, then with plan B, then with plan C, then with plan D, and finally we decided on plan E, which was a biennial for professionals. That was possible, we were allowed to do it, ”said BIAC organizer Raquel Rache de Andrade.

The dozen of performances included upside down tutus, acrobatic bikes, brightly colored parachutes, and enough contortionism to shock a chiropractor.

Philippines’ Duterte tightens anti-money laundering guidelines to keep away from `gray checklist’

FILE PHOTO: Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte gestures during his fourth state of the nation address at the Philippine Congress in Quezon City, Metro Manila, the Philippines, July 22, 2019. REUTERS / Eloisa Lopez / File Photo

MANILA (Reuters) – Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte signed a bill on Friday to strengthen anti-money laundering and terrorist financing regulations before the February 1st deadline set by a global financial watchdog.

The Southeast Asian nation threatened to return to a Financial Action Task Force “gray list” that could delay foreign investment and remittances from millions of overseas Filipinos who keep domestic consumer spending under tighter control and surveillance.

The new law extends the powers of the Anti-Money Laundering Council (AMLC) and enables it to impose targeted financial sanctions on the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and their financing. It also enables the council to apply for subpoenas, search and seizure warrants.

“In line with its foreign policy, the state will expand cooperation in cross-border investigations and prosecutions against people involved in money laundering activities, wherever this is done,” the legislation says.

The AMLC will also be able to facilitate transactions with Filipino online casino operators who employ thousands of mainland Chinese, as well as real estate firms and brokers making individual cash transactions valued at more than 7.5 million pesos ($ 160,000) check.

The Financial Action Task Force, a Paris-based intergovernmental agency, graylisted the Philippines in 2000 for not addressing money laundering issues. It was removed from the list in 2005 following a change in the law.

The agency gave the Philippines until February 1 to tighten its anti-money laundering law and extend its original deadline of October 2020 due to the coronavirus pandemic.

($ 1 = 48.06 Philippine Pesos)

Reporting by Neil Jerome Morales; Editing by Mike Harrison

Gyms, indoor leisure reopened Friday, listed here are the principles

For the first time since November 2020, fitness centers and other facilities offering indoor activities were able to open on Friday in countries where there is an extreme risk of the spread of COVID-19.

This includes facilities in Marion, Polk, and Lane counties.

The state published detailed rules for opening in these counties on Friday. Here’s what you need to know.

What’s in the new rules?

Indoor recreational and fitness facilities include gyms, indoor K-12 sports, indoor college sports, fitness organizations, indoor recreational sports, and indoor pools.

Indoor entertainment facilities include aquariums; Indoor theaters, arenas and concert halls; Indoor gardens; Indoor museums and other indoor entertainment activities.

How many people are allowed in?

Facilities 500 square feet or larger can have up to six customers, with no employees. Multi-room facilities can have six customers per room, up to a total of 24.

This number was chosen because it complies with indoor collection guidelines, state health officials said at a news conference on Friday.

Facilities smaller than 500 square meters can have a customer and an employee.

Are there any other rules?

In leisure and fitness facilities, customers are limited to 45 minutes. People from different households must be kept at least 25 feet apart. Eating and drinking is prohibited except for individual water bottles.

Indoor entertainment facilities require that people from different households be kept a minimum of six feet apart. Eating and drinking is prohibited.

More:Oregon’s next phase of COVID-19 vaccination will include approximately 1.2 million people

Both types of devices must ensure that everyone wears a mask unless it is not possible, e.g. B. when swimming or showering. And employees must follow the cleaning protocols.

What about senior centers with fitness facilities?

Senior centers across Oregon will have to remain closed for the time being.

Which counties are affected by the new rules?

The counties with “extreme risk” change every two weeks. Until February 11th they are:

  • baker
  • Benton
  • Clackamas
  • Clatsop
  • Columbia
  • Coos
  • rogue
  • Deschutes
  • Hood River
  • Jackson
  • Jefferson
  • Josephine
  • Klamath
  • roadway
  • Linn
  • bad luck
  • Marion
  • tomorrow
  • Multnomah
  • Polk
  • Umatilla
  • union
  • Wasco
  • Washington
  • Yamhill

Tracy Loew is a reporter for the Statesman Journal. She can be reached at tloew@statesmanjournal.com, 503-399-6779 or on Twitter at @Tracy_Loew. Support local journalism through Subscribe to the Statesman Journal.

Choose: Ogden legal professional violated ethics guidelines by withholding, spending shopper’s cash | Courts

OGDEN – A judge found Monday that an Ogden attorney violated the rules of professional ethics by pocketing and pretending to be a client’s dispute settlement and lying about it after he was caught.

At the end of a two-and-a-half-day trial in the Second District Court, Judge Noel Hyde ruled that Richard H. Reeve had been guilty of dishonesty, failed to seize three clients’ funds, and wrongly granted a paralegal curtailment of a settlement.

Hyde also objected to statements made by Reeve during the trial, saying there was “no evidence” to support some of Reeve’s allegations, “even under oath on his testimony during that trial.”

The judge said Reeve “stopped short of deliberate perjury, but there were certainly shades and artful answers to questions.”

Hyde hosted a status conference on February 25 that gave Reeve and Barbara Townsend, an attorney for the Office of Professional Conduct at the Utah State Bar, time to prepare for the trial.

Possible penalties range from a warning to a ban.

The OPC filed the case in 2017, accusing Reeve of processing a $ 380,000 severance payment awarded to Jean Tonioli in a 2015 death against a drug company. The Roy wife’s husband, Bob, died in New York City when the couple returned from a Baltic vacation in 2011.

The previous Monday, Townsend interviewed Reeve about two withdrawals he made in August and September 2015 from the personal credit union account where he had deposited Tonioli’s stake of approximately $ 254,000 in February.

Reeve testified that he withdrew $ 22,110 on Aug. 1 to pay a car dealer for a vehicle and on Sept. 9, he withdrew $ 16,000 to pay a woman who later became a wife.

Townsend said those withdrawals came “after he testified there was trouble” when he was able to pay Tonioli because by then much of her money had been spent.

Last week, Reeve blamed his ex-wife for at least two large withdrawals earlier this year that he said still had access to the account during the divorce.

In her concluding argument, Townsend said, even if his ex-wife spent part of Tonioli’s money, “He’s the attorney in charge of the settlement money. It doesn’t matter what (the first wife) did.”

“Over the course of seven months, he spent not only $ 99,000 on what was his (part of the settlement) but also $ 167,000 of Tonioli’s money,” Townsend said.

Last week Townsend detailed other expenses, such as trips to Las Vegas, San Antonio and Jackson Hole, Wyoming, and purchases from wedding chapels and rings.

Reeve, who represented himself in the ethics process, admitted in his final argument that he had endangered his integrity, put his legal partners in a difficult position and violated Tonioli’s trust.

“I deeply regret the behavior I demonstrated,” he said, adding that he “tried to take immediate steps to correct the problems.”

Townsend argued that the evidence is overwhelming that Reeve is violating the rule of ethics that prevents a lawyer from engaging in “dishonesty, fraud, deception or misconduct”.

According to testimony, Reeve ordered his trainee attorney to have the billing check forwarded to him, not the usual procedure on the law firm’s escrow account.

That was in February 2015. The paralegal eventually went to executives at a law firm in Ogden, where she and Reeve were working on his failure to pay Tonioli and his client’s stone wall when she asked for the money.

Reeve was confronted with this in September 2015, saying the money was in an escrow account and Tonioli knew about it. After the company investigated, Reeve changed its story, saying the settlement was still pending in federal court, which was also wrong.

The company fired Reeve on September 16, and he met with Tonioli and her son the next day to pay for the money they had come.

But as evidence, the OPC produced a document Reeve had prepared for that meeting, which Townsend said covered up the truth about what had happened to the money.

“He made up this document to show for the Toniolis’ that it was all in there all along,” said Townsend. “Don’t be fooled by what Mr. Reeve said.”

Hyde ruled that several of the arguments Reeve made in his defense were “not credible”, including his description of that September 17 document.

The document, a screenshot of what was presented as a credit union banking record, “is in and of itself a misrepresentation and Mr. Reeve knew it at the time he was preparing it,” said Hyde.

Hyde said he found it “very worrying” that Reeve would “go to considerable effort in attempting to create the appearance of a justification for this document” by this process.

Last week Reeve testified that he had sold part of his stake in a limited liability company to his brother so that he could raise enough money to pay Tonioli what she owed.

But Hyde said Reeves’ details on these moves “weighs on credibility” because there is no record of such a transaction and no evidence of the source of the $ 167,000 Reeve deposited to offset what he spent.

The judge found that Reeve had broken rules not to trust the custody of client funds in the Tonioli matter and two other cases where Reeve had directed the trainee attorney to send settlements to him.

Hyde also confirmed allegations that Reeve violated restrictions on attorney independence by seeing the trainee attorney received approximately $ 3,000 from his share of court profits.