Rogue Valley man creates intersection of leisure at elementary college

WHITE CITY, Ore. – A new border guard at an elementary school in White City attracts attention with his unique way of directing traffic and makes friends in the community.

While being a cross guard is a serious job, Mario Arenas makes sure people are safe and having fun at the same time.

“I’ve always loved working with kids. So it’s kind of a dream job, if you want to call it a job. I have fun with it from the moment I’m here until I leave,” said Arenas.

He started as a teaching assistant at Table Rock Elementary School just 7 weeks ago.

Arenas works in various small jobs on campus, but is becoming increasingly popular as the school’s new border guard.

“One of the areas where we needed assistance was the morning crosswalk. So one day we asked him for instructions and responsibilities, and then one day I looked outside and he was dancing. I said to the staff: “Is he dancing?” and they said “yes”. I watched him out there and it was great, ”said director Valerie Shehorn.

Shehorn says students and parents love to be, ‘Mr. Mario, as he is called, every morning.

“It was wonderful to have such a positive greeter on the corner, not only on cross-walk duty but also to really welcome our tiger community to school,” said Shehorn.

Arenas shows up every day to work in different outfits, but he says they are not costumes. “They really aren’t costumes because I wear them off duty, I just have them and I like to have fun.”

He even goes a step further during the holidays.

“If there’s a holiday, Cinco de Mayo, St. Patrick’s Day, whatever it is, Halloween, Christmas – I’ll have an outfit for it,” he said.

Prinicpal Shehorn says the school bought him his Table Rock Elementary sign because of his enthusiasm, adding, “Mr. Mario ‘has become part of the school culture this year.

“It’s something I don’t see anytime soon,” said Director Shehorn.

Copyright 2021 California-Oregon Broadcasting, Inc.

Rogue Valley man creates intersection of leisure at elementary college

WHITE CITY, Ore. – A new border guard at an elementary school in White City attracts attention with his unique way of directing traffic and makes friends in the community.

While being a cross guard is a serious job, Mario Arenas makes sure people are safe and having fun at the same time.

“I’ve always loved working with kids. So it’s kind of a dream job, if you want to call it a job. I have fun with it from the moment I’m here until I leave,” said Arenas.

He started as a teaching assistant at Table Rock Elementary School just 7 weeks ago.

Arenas works in various small jobs on campus, but is becoming increasingly popular as the school’s new border guard.

“One of the areas where we needed assistance was the morning crosswalk. So one day we asked him for instructions and responsibilities, and then one day I looked outside and he was dancing. I said to the staff: “Is he dancing?” and they said “yes”. I watched him out there and it was great, ”said director Valerie Shehorn.

Shehorn says students and parents love to be, ‘Mr. Mario, as he is called, every morning.

“It was wonderful to have such a positive greeter on the corner, not only on cross-walk duty but also to really welcome our tiger community to school,” said Shehorn.

Arenas shows up every day to work in different outfits, but he says they are not costumes. “They really aren’t costumes because I wear them off duty, I just have them and I like to have fun.”

He even goes a step further during the holidays.

“If there’s a holiday, Cinco de Mayo, St. Patrick’s Day, whatever it is, Halloween, Christmas – I’ll have an outfit for it,” he said.

Prinicpal Shehorn says the school bought him his Table Rock Elementary sign because of his enthusiasm, adding, “Mr. Mario ‘has become part of the school culture this year.

“It’s something I don’t see anytime soon,” said Director Shehorn.

NBC5 news reporter Mariah Mills is from Medford. She graduated from the University of Oregon with a bachelor’s degree in journalism. She also studied sociology.

At school, she reported on Oregon athletics for the student-run Duck TV. When she’s not reporting, reading, hiking, and rooting for her favorite teams, the Seattle Seahawks and Oregon Ducks.

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Evaluation: New guide spotlights rogue lab and a shadow business | Leisure



This cover photo, published by Avery / Penguin Random House, features “Kill Shot: A Shadow Industry, a Deadly Disease” by Jason Dearen.


HONS

From ANN LEVIN Associated Press

“Kill Shot: A Shadow Industry, A Deadly Disease” by Jason Dearen (Avery)

Lower back pain. Stenosis of the spine. Cataracts. All of these conditions are treated with drugs made by compound pharmacies. And these drugs can blind you or kill you, in large part because there is almost no government oversight.

In his great but disturbing new book, Kill Shot, Associated Press investigative reporter Jason Dearen examines the shadow industry of compounding pharmacies and various unsuccessful efforts to contain it. The story centers around the New England Compounding Center, which produced mold-infected batches of an injectable steroid in 2012 that killed more than 100 people and made nearly 800 others sick in 20 states.

Eventually the laboratory in Framingham, Massachusetts, half an hour west of Boston, closed and 13 people, including co-owner Barry Cadden and supervising pharmacist Glenn Chin, were convicted of federal crimes. But, as Dearen makes clear in his gripping, tightly-written narrative, the problems of putting together pharmacies that make up at least 10% of the country’s drug supply are far from over.

Drawing on transcripts, interviews, FDA inspection reports, and other sources, he reconstructs this slow-moving tragedy into scenes of almost cinematic intensity. We meet the sympathetic victims, including many elderly people with chronic pain who, after receiving the injections, slowly and terribly died of fungal meningitis and its complications. We also meet the die-hard lab owners who wanted to get rich by cutting corners, hiring unqualified staff, running a dirty business, and relying on payouts to boost business.

Assessment: New guide spotlights rogue lab and a shadow trade | Leisure



This cover photo, published by Avery / Penguin Random House, features “Kill Shot: A Shadow Industry, a Deadly Disease” by Jason Dearen.


HONS

From ANN LEVIN Associated Press

“Kill Shot: A Shadow Industry, A Deadly Disease” by Jason Dearen (Avery)

Lower back pain. Stenosis of the spine. Cataracts. All of these conditions are treated with drugs made by compound pharmacies. And these drugs can blind you or kill you, in large part because there is almost no government oversight.

In his great but disturbing new book, Kill Shot, Associated Press investigative reporter Jason Dearen examines the shadow industry of compounding pharmacies and various unsuccessful efforts to contain it. The story centers around the New England Compounding Center, which produced mold-infected batches of an injectable steroid in 2012 that killed more than 100 people and made nearly 800 others sick in 20 states.

Eventually the laboratory in Framingham, Massachusetts, half an hour west of Boston, closed and 13 people, including co-owner Barry Cadden and supervising pharmacist Glenn Chin, were convicted of federal crimes. But, as Dearen makes clear in his gripping, tightly-written narrative, the problems of putting together pharmacies that make up at least 10% of the country’s drug supply are far from over.

Drawing on transcripts, interviews, FDA inspection reports, and other sources, he reconstructs this slow-moving tragedy into scenes of almost cinematic intensity. We meet the sympathetic victims, including many elderly people with chronic pain who, after receiving the injections, slowly and terribly died of fungal meningitis and its complications. We also meet the die-hard lab owners who wanted to get rich by cutting corners, hiring unqualified staff, running a dirty business, and relying on payouts to boost business.

Overview: New guide spotlights rogue lab and a shadow trade | Leisure



This cover photo, published by Avery / Penguin Random House, features “Kill Shot: A Shadow Industry, a Deadly Disease” by Jason Dearen.


HONS

From ANN LEVIN Associated Press

“Kill Shot: A Shadow Industry, A Deadly Disease” by Jason Dearen (Avery)

Lower back pain. Stenosis of the spine. Cataracts. All of these conditions are treated with drugs made by compound pharmacies. And these drugs can blind you or kill you, in large part because there is almost no government oversight.

In his great but disturbing new book, Kill Shot, Associated Press investigative reporter Jason Dearen examines the shadow industry of compounding pharmacies and various unsuccessful efforts to contain it. The story centers around the New England Compounding Center, which produced mold-infected batches of an injectable steroid in 2012 that killed more than 100 people and made nearly 800 others sick in 20 states.

Eventually the laboratory in Framingham, Massachusetts, half an hour west of Boston, closed and 13 people, including co-owner Barry Cadden and supervising pharmacist Glenn Chin, were convicted of federal crimes. But, as Dearen makes clear in his gripping, tightly-written narrative, the problems of putting together pharmacies that make up at least 10% of the country’s drug supply are far from over.

Drawing on transcripts, interviews, FDA inspection reports, and other sources, he reconstructs this slow-moving tragedy into scenes of almost cinematic intensity. We meet the sympathetic victims, including many elderly people with chronic pain who, after receiving the injections, slowly and terribly died of fungal meningitis and its complications. We also meet the die-hard lab owners who wanted to get rich by cutting corners, hiring unqualified staff, running a dirty business, and relying on payouts to boost business.