St. Louis evictions resume as state, native reduction cash sits unused | Metro

But landlords, who argued they had to pay bills too, hailed the end of the moratorium.

Tommie Conwill, who has rented the house next to hers near Festus for 30 years, said Friday she doubts she will ever get a dime from tenants who haven’t paid rent in seven months. She was able to legally expel them in March for damaging their property.

“Seven months without paying anything and all the while getting stimulus money,” said Conwill, 83. “I could have got her out in the second month, but because of the moratorium I couldn’t legally touch her. This is the worst thing the government has ever done. “

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On Friday, St. Louis Circuit Court presiding judge Michael Stelzer issue an order to lift the court ban about the eviction procedure. It’s not clear how many local people are lagging behind and homeless, but nationally an estimated 3.5 million families reported in early August that they would face eviction within the next two months, according to the US Census Bureau.

Meanwhile, Jones urged evicted city tenants to get help applying for allowances at walk-in clinics, the next week of Horizon housing, 3001 Arsenal Street and Wohl Recreation Center, 1515 North Kingshighway. In the past two weeks they have helped with around 200 applications, said the mayor’s office.

Stay Nation Leisure Inventory May Resume Path Greater

The shares of Live Nation Entertainment, Inc. (NYSE: LYV) are up 1% to $ 86.80 on its most recent review after the entertainment company named Joe Berchtold as CFO yesterday. In addition, ASM Global has expanded its partnership with Ticketmaster by enabling the company to conduct ticket sales for shows promoted by Live Nation. The stock is already up 75.8% year-over-year, hitting a record high of $ 94.63 on March 3rd. The even better news is that LYV recently pulled back on a trendline with historically bullish implications, suggesting the stock could climb back up the charts soon.

Specifically, the security was just within one standard deviation of its 80-day moving average after spending about a month above this trendline. According to data from Schaeffer’s Senior Quantitative Analyst Rocky White, 10 similar signals have occurred in the past three years. Live Nation stocks returned positive returns 70% of those times a month later, up an average of 7.3%. From its current position, a similar move would bring the LYV above the $ 93 mark, which is just below the stock’s record high.

LYV 80 days

A short squeeze would keep the stock in the back of the wind. Short rates rose 10.1% over the last period, and the 12.95 million stocks sold short now account for a whopping 8.6% of the stock’s free float, nearly two weeks of pent-up purchasing power.

Now seems like a good opportunity to weigh Live Nation stock’s next move with options. The Schaeffer’s Volatility Index (SVI) of 34% is in the extremely low 1st percentile of its annual range. This means that option players are pricing in low volatility expectations.

Superior Excursions look to renew journeys as leisure venues open

The tour bus industry had a great success during the coronavirus pandemic. However, this should change when the entertainment venues reopen. || COVID-19 updates | Maryland’s latest numbers | Get tested | Vaccine info || A bus company is looking forward to opening additional venues. With the opening of New York and surrounding states, companies like Superior Tours can hit the streets again after the shutdown. “We’ve basically been closed – the entire coach industry. On average, we’ve lost about 90% of our sales in the last 13 months,” said Marc Komins, co-owner of Superior Tours. Komins’ family has owned and operated Superior Tours for 26 years . His company flies mainly to New York and Atlantic City. “Hopefully with the opening of New York we can resume our daily service in New York City. We used to travel there four days a week,” said Komins said Superior Tours plans to resume New York City trips on the first weekend in June to record. The company already makes trips to Atlantic City every Sunday. For many, New York trips include a day at the theater. Broadway will reopen on September 17th and good news for those who enjoy taking the bus to Radio City Music Hall for the Christmas spectacle. Komins said it was a special trip. “It’s a round trip transportation. It’s an orchestra seat to the show and then a transportation at the end of the day,” said Komins. If you take the bus, you get a temperature check and have to wear a mask. The bus has special air filters and all drivers are vaccinated. “We don’t sell the full capacity of the seats like the airlines have done. If people travel together, like a husband and wife or a sibling, and they are comfortably seated together, that’s fine. If people travel alone, then we save them their own place, “said Komins. By the time those New York runs get into full swing, Komins said they do sports trips in college and high school and they will. “Go on camp trips this summer. For a list of other summer destinations, see here.

The tour bus industry had a great success during the coronavirus pandemic. However, this should change when the entertainment venues reopen.

|| COVID-19 updates | Maryland’s latest numbers | Get tested | Vaccine info ||

A bus company is looking forward to opening additional venues.

As New York and the surrounding states open up, companies like Superior Tours can hit the streets again after the shutdown.

“We’ve basically been shut down – the entire coach industry has been shut down. On average, we’ve lost about 90% of our sales in the last 13 months,” said Marc Komins, co-owner of Superior Tours.

Komins’ family has owned and operated Superior Tours for 26 years. His company flies mainly to New York and Atlantic City.

“Hopefully with the opening of New York City we can resume our daily service in New York City. We used to travel there four days a week,” said Komins.

Komins said Superior Tours plans to resume New York City trips on the first weekend in June. The company already makes trips to Atlantic City every Sunday.

For many, New York trips include a day at the theater. Broadway will reopen on September 17th and good news for those who enjoy taking the bus to Radio City Music Hall for the Christmas spectacle. Komins said it was a special trip.

“It’s transportation there and back. It’s an orchestra seat for the show and then it’s transportation back at the end of the day,” said Komins.

Anyone traveling by bus is given a temperature control and has to wear a mask. The bus has special air filters and all drivers are vaccinated.

“We’re not selling full seat capacity like the airlines have started. If people travel together, like a husband and wife, or a sibling, and they’re comfortable sitting together, that’s fine. If they are If people travel alone, then it’s us. ” save them their own place, “said Komins.

Until those New York runs are in full swing, Komins said they will be doing college and high school sports trips and will be doing camp trips this summer. A A list of other summer destinations can be found here.

CDC provides cruise traces subsequent steps to renew crusing | Arts & Leisure

ORLANDO, Florida – The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently issued new cruise ship engineering guidelines to continue the return to sailing.

All major cruise lines departing from U.S. ports are subject to the CDC Conditional Sailing Ordinance, which was enacted last October in lieu of a no-sail order issued in March 2020. This includes setting up a test infrastructure on board and on land as well as performing simulated trips before a line can sail again with paying customers.

However, the cruise industry has asked for more guidance on how to get to these steps. The new guidelines promise to bring cruise ships closer to a return to business.

“CDC is committed to working with the cruise industry and seaport partners to resume cruising when it is safe to do so,” said a statement on the new technical guidelines.

The next steps, which the CDC is now referring to as Step 2A of a four-step plan, is that the cruise lines must have:

– Increase in reporting frequency of COVID-19 cases and diseases from weekly to daily.

– Perform routine tests of all crew members based on the color status of each ship.

– Updated the color coding system to classify ship status related to COVID-19.

– Reduced the time it takes a “red” ship to go “green” from 28 to 14 days based on the availability of onboard tests, routine screening test protocols and daily reports.

– Prepare planning documents for agreements that need to be approved by port authorities and local health authorities to ensure that cruise ships have the necessary infrastructure to cope with a COVID-19 outbreak on their ships that are exposed.

– Prepare a plan and schedule for vaccination of crew and port personnel.

The new guidelines are the first mention of vaccination and do not require the crew or port workers to be vaccinated.

However, in its statement, the CDC suggests that the more potential port workers and passengers are vaccinated, the faster this process will happen.

“The COVID-19 vaccination effort will be critical to the safe resumption of passenger operations,” said the CDC. “As more people become fully vaccinated, the step-by-step approach enables the CDC to incorporate these advances into planning to resume cruise shipping when it is safe to do so. CDC recommends that all eligible port workers and travelers (passengers and crew) receive a COVID-19 vaccine, if one is available to them. “

Cruise ships have been at the center of several deadly outbreaks in the first few months of 2020, including several ships preventing passengers from disembarking. One of the worst was Princess Cruises’ Diamond Princess, which killed 14 people. These issues resulted in both the cruise industry voluntarily closing last March, as well as the CDC sails-no command.

Florida Governor Ron DeSantis held a discussion in Port Canaveral last month with cruise guides from Royal Caribbean, Disney, Norwegian, Carnival, MSC Cruises and other politicians calling on the CDC to take the next steps to reopen the industry. He pointed out that several lines have already started the safe resumption of sailing in other markets around the world. That discussion was based on a letter signed by two Florida senators and other elected officials to the CDC asking for more guidance.

At the beginning of March, the Cruise Lines International Association asked the CDC to completely cancel the conditional sail order by July. However, the CDC replied that it intended to keep the order, which doesn’t expire until November 1, 2021, but would see some changes.

The new guide maintains its 74 points, but means that cruise lines now have at least the next few steps towards the ultimate goal of a full return.

“Driving safely and responsibly during a global pandemic is difficult,” the statement said. “While cruises always pose some risk to the transmission of COVID-19, following the phases of the (conditional sail order) ensures that cruise ship passenger operations are carried out in such a way that crew members, passengers and port staff are protected, especially if new ones emerge COVID -19 worrying variants. “

A hopeful pandemic notice: Tanglewood music competition to renew | Leisure




FILE – In this July 7, 2006 file photo, Michael Van Parks (left) pouring wine with friends, Bill Beeman (center) and Don Usher (right), across West Hartford, Connecticut, while having a picnic on the Tanglewood lawn makes in Lenox, Mass. before the start of the opening night of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. The Boston Symphony Orchestra announced Friday, March 19, 2021 that its 2021 outdoor season at Tanglewood, the summer home of the prestigious Symphony in the Berkshires, western Massachusetts, will see a return to personal live from July 9 to August 16 Will include concerts. The event was canceled in 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic.




FILE – In this file photo dated July 9, 2004, Kurt Masur conducts the Boston Symphony Orchestra on the season’s opening night at Tanglewood, Lenox, Massachusetts. The Boston Symphony Orchestra announced on Friday, March 19, 2021 that its 2021 outdoor season will take place in Tanglewood, U.S. The acclaimed Symphony’s summer home in the Berkshires of western Massachusetts is offering a return to personal from July 9 to August 16 Live concerts. The event was canceled in 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic.




A Hopeful Pandemic: The Tanglewood Music Festival Continues

FILE – In this file photo dated Nov. 20, 2014, Music Director of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Andris Nelsons, is rehearsing at Symphony Hall in Boston. The Boston Symphony Orchestra has not played live for fans since the coronavirus pandemic broke out a year ago, but is returning to the stage for the outdoor Tanglewood Festival in July.

By WILLIAM J. KOLE Associated Press

If you’re a classical music fan, this is music to your ears: one of the country’s premier summer festivals is returning after the coronavirus pandemic silenced it for the first time since World War II.

The Boston Symphony Orchestra announced Friday that its 2021 outdoor season at Tanglewood, the summer home of the prestigious Symphony in the Berkshires, western Massachusetts, will include a return to in-person live concerts from July 9 to August 16.

Concerts in Tanglewood, where fans spread blankets on manicured lawns, sip wine and picnic under the stars, have been a summer rite in New England since 1937.

However, the pandemic forced organizers to cancel the 2020 festival, switch to online appearances, and mute a tradition that annually attracts nearly 350,000 visitors from around the world and adds $ 100 million to the region’s economy. Until last year, the live music had flowed practically uninterrupted and was not finally canceled until 1943 at the height of the Second World War.

“I’m sure we will all experience the incredible power of music on a whole new level,” said Andris Nelsons, the BSO’s music director, in a statement.

“I hope that at this moment we will discover an even deeper meaning and purpose for the music in our lives together – as it is sure to fill our hearts and renew our spirits,” he said.