Nationwide Restaurant Affiliation asks Congress for assist amid omicron

On March 18, 2021, people in New York City dine at an outdoor dining patio set up at a restaurant.

Angela Weiss | AFP | Getty Images

The National Restaurant Association is asking Congress to replenish the Restaurant Revitalization Fund as the Omicron variant hits operators’ businesses.

Last year, lawmakers set up the $28.6 billion fund to help bars and restaurants struggling in the wake of the crisis pandemic. The grants were intended to cover a restaurant’s total pandemic losses of up to $5 million for a single location or $10 million for a business with fewer than 20 locations. Public companies were not eligible, but their franchisees could still apply.

With the fund depleted, restaurants pressed for Congress to refill it. Several lawmakers have introduced legislation to do so, but the bills haven’t gained traction and the Biden administration didn’t seem interested in backing the measure.

but the recent spike in Covid-19 cases and its impact on restaurants could change minds.

The latest National Restaurant Association survey of operators found that 88% of restaurants saw a drop in demand for indoor dining due to the Omicron variant. More than three-quarters of those polled told the trade group that business conditions are worse now than they were three months ago. And the majority of operators said their restaurant is less profitable today than it was before the pandemic.

“Alarmingly, the industry has still not recovered the more than 650,000 jobs lost at the start of the pandemic, a loss 45% more than the closest industry,” trade group top lobbyist Sean Kennedy wrote in a letter to the Congress leadership for both parties .

Kennedy also noted the benefits of the first round of RRF grants. The trade group estimates the first round of funding saved more than 900,000 restaurant jobs, and 96% of recipients said the grant made it more likely they could stay in business. A full replenishment of the fund would save more than 1.6 million jobs, the trade group estimates.

Effectively-traveled chef finds a house in Shelby Park with Roman-style pizza restaurant

A well-traveled chef finds a home in Shelby Park with a Roman-style pizza restaurant

The chef, trained by Bobby Flay, opens a Roman-style pizza restaurant in the Shelby Park neighborhood, building on his childhood roots.

Updated: 8:50 p.m. EST November 19, 2021

Emil David grew up in Pampanga, a province in the Philippines northwest of Manilla. When he was 16, David’s mother lost her business due to a natural disaster and the family moved to Rome, Italy to start over. One of the things David liked most about Rome was the shops and bakeries selling square slices of Roman style pizza. Roman pizza, unlike the more common Neapolitan pizzas, has a thin crust like a flat focaccia and is usually cut into squares. “It was easy to buy these pizzas. You didn’t have to go to a restaurant. I just asked my mother for two euros and then went to a store to buy a slice of it. ”In October, David and his wife Liz opened Square Cut Pizza at 741 E. Oak St., Shelby Park. The couple also run an ice cream parlor called Sugar Room in the same 4,500 square foot space. Square Cut Pizza has an open kitchen, bar and seating for up to 50 people. There is also an outdoor area with seating for 8 to 10 people. To learn more about Square Cut Pizza, visit our media partner Louisville Business First.

Emil David grew up in Pampanga, a province in the Philippines northwest of Manilla. When he was 16, David’s mother lost her business due to a natural disaster and the family moved to Rome, Italy to start over.

One of the things David liked most about Rome was the shops and bakeries that sold square pieces of Roman pizza. Roman pizza, unlike the more common Neapolitan pizza, has a thin crust like a flat focaccia and is usually cut into squares.

“When I was in Rome it was just very comforting,” remembers David, 36. “It was easy to buy these pizzas. You didn’t have to go to a restaurant. I just asked my mother for two euros and then in went to a store to buy a disc. “

In October, David and his wife, Liz, opened Square Cut Pizza at 741 E. Oak St. in the Shelby Park neighborhood. The couple also run an ice cream parlor called Sugar Room in the same 4,500 square foot space.

Square Cut Pizza has an open kitchen, bar and seating for up to 50 people. There is also an outdoor area with seating for 8 to 10 people.

To learn more about Square Cut Pizza, visit our media partner Louisville Business First.

Bay Shore’s new artsy, tapas-style restaurant Zest opens tomorrow


Chef Michael Liebman’s motto is to live life with joie de vivre – and it is precisely this energy that he would like to exude with the food and art in his new restaurant.

Tomorrow, November 16, at 4 p.m. his tapas-style restaurant, Citrus peel, debuts to the public at 298 West Main St. on Bay Shore, in the building where he previously served as the Executive Chef for Slice of Bay Shore.

During the soft opening of the restaurant on the weekend, family and friends tried his menu and got a glimpse into the completely changed room.

“Hopefully the friendliness of the staff and the facility will make everyone want to come back,” he said. “It’s a great community and we never really understood how young Bay Shore really is.”

With bright colors and pop art photography throughout the room, Liebman hopes to create a positive atmosphere that unites people under a common denominator: food.

The menu includes upscale sandwiches, tapas-style entrees, and a bevy of small plates instead of entrees.

Customers can choose from a selection of beers, organic wines and a range of sangrias, which Zest will also offer as a flight option.

Portraits of a range of musicians and cultural icons – from Aretha Franklin to Marilyn Monroe to the Notorious BIG – line the dining room walls. Outside there is a mural that reads “Live Life with Zest” – an ideal backdrop for Insta-worthy photos.

Liebman wants Zest to be that family-friendly neighborhood spot and attract a younger crowd.

For example, children visiting them can unleash their inner artist with coloring and drawing sheets that Liebman wants to post on social media.

“I just wanted something that wasn’t the norm,” he said of Zest.

Click here to see the full story of how Zest came about here.

Scroll through the photos below to see the interior of the newly decorated restaurant.

Keep following greatbayshore.com for updates on Zest and follow the new Bay Shore Joint on Instagram (@zestlongisland).

Previous reporting:

Above: Marilyn Monroe street art painting at the Zest on Bay Shore. Photo by Ana Borruto.

Tinley’s Lengthy Seashore Facility to Produce Non-Alcoholic Craft-Fashion Drinks, developed with BJ’s Restaurant & Brewhouse, for Soma Beverage Firm

“THCeer’s!” ‘Hopping’ High Ride “

“THCeer’s!” ‘Hoppin’ High Ride ‘is expected to be distributed to California pharmacies and home delivery licensees in the first quarter of 2022. (Concept art only.)

“THCeer’s!” ‘Hoppin’ High Ride ‘is expected to be distributed to California pharmacies and home delivery licensees in the first quarter of 2022. (Concept art only.)

TORONTO and LOS ANGELES, Nov. 12, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) – The Tinley Beverage Company Inc. (CSE: TNY, OTC: TNYBF) (“Tinley’s” or the “Company”) is pleased to announce that Soma Beverage Company Inc .’s (“Soma”) craft-style non-alcoholic “Hoppin ‘High Ride”, developed in collaboration with the brewmasters at BJ’s Restaurants, Inc. (“BJ’s”), is preservative-free through a new closed loop infusion and pasteurization process for cannabis at Tinley’s Long Beach facility.

Soma’s new ‘THCeer’s!’ “High Ride” beverages, of which “Hoppin ‘High Ride” is the first variety to be launched, were conceived by the managing directors of Soma, a long-established large-scale artisan cannabis grower. As they explored new categories of consumables for growing craft cannabis, they naturally chose other long-term partners who are similarly committed to crafting on a large scale – BJ’s Restaurant & Brewhouse, a 25-year craft brewer and winners of 38 Great Medals American Beer Festival.

Soma worked with two master brewers from BJ’s to create their traditionally styled, non-alcoholic craft brews. Alex Puchner, BJ’s original master brewer and current Senior Vice President of Brewing Operations, and Aaron Stueck, Director of R&D, applied their skills and experience to the challenge: removing the alcohol without adding to the freshness and complexity of the aromas in traditional craft brews affect. After two years of crafting, dealcoholizing, recrafting and testing, Soma’s Cannabis has infused ‘THCeer’s!’ ‘Hoppin’ High Ride ‘is ready for production.

“We selected Tinley’s to manufacture our first uniquely designed infusion product for launch in California,” said Eric Cernich, Soma CFO. “The Long Beach team has experience with both large format CPG beverages and craft brewing. They share our strong commitment to quality and have developed solutions that respect and protect the art and science behind these products. With Tinley’s we will bring authentic non-alcoholic craft brew experiences to the market that are fortified with THC and with no added preservatives, ”he added.

The story goes on

“We are excited to be on our way to producing Soma’s ‘High Ride’ in Lakewood,” said Richard Gillis, President and COO, Tinley USA, Office of the CEO. “This innovative partnership between Soma and BJ’s unlocks several new capabilities in our facility, including closed intake and infusion, tunnel pasteurization to avoid extra preservatives, and tight control of product specifications – all to ensure consistent craft quality, THC potency and performance, and more generally Taste experience. “

About Soma Beverage Company, Inc.
Soma Beverages was founded by skilled growers of cannabis on a large scale. Soma is working to identify and develop partnerships that will drive scaled growth in new categories of consumable cannabis. Soma’s partnership with BJ’s to produce craft brewed infused drinks based on classic craft brew styles is soon to be palatable proof of Soma’s strategy.
For more information on Soma, see www.thceer.com, or contact Eric Cernich, CFO, Soma Beverage Company, at thceer@gmail.com.

About BJ’s Restaurants, Inc.
BJ’s Restaurants, Inc. (“BJ’s”) is a national brand with brewhouse roots in which craftsmanship plays a role. BJ’s wide menu offers something for everyone: slow-roasted starters such as Prime Rib, BJ’s EnLIGHTened Entrees® with Cherry Chipotle Glazed Salmon, characteristic deep dish pizza and the often imitated but never replicated world-famous Pizookie® dessert. A pioneer in the craft brewing world since 1996, BJ’s prides itself on serving BJ’s award-winning, proprietary handcrafted beers, brewed at its breweries in five states and by independent third-party manufacturers. The BJ’s experience features quality ingredients, bold flavors, moderate prices, genuine service, and a cool, modern atmosphere. Founded in 1978, BJ’s owns and operates 212 casual dining restaurants in 29 states: Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Nevada, New Jersey , New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and Washington. All restaurants offer dine-in, take-out, delivery service and catering for large parties.
For more information on BJ, see https://www.bjsrestaurants.com or contact Alex Puchner, SVP Brewing Operations, BJ Restaurants, Inc. at (714) 500-2400.

Via The Tinley Beverage Company and Beckett’s Tonics
The Tinley Beverage Company Inc. (CSE: TNY; OTC: TNYBF) manufactures the Beckett’s Classics ™ and Beckett’s 27 ™ lines of non-alcoholic, terpened spirits and cocktails. Beckett’s products are available at major grocery, beverage, and specialty retailers, as well as online in the United States, and in grocery and specialty stores in Canada. Cannabis-infused versions of these products are sold under the Tinley’s ™ brand in licensed pharmacies and home delivery services across California, with expansion into Canada underway. Tinley’s Long Beach, California facility houses some of the most versatile and technologically advanced cannabis-licensed beverage manufacturing facilities in the state, and provides proprietary branded manufacturing services for third-party brands. Please visit www.drinkbecketts.com, www.drinktinley.com, Twitter and Instagram (@drinktinleys and @drinkbecketts) for recipes, product information and home delivery options.

Forward-Looking Statements
This press release contains forward-looking statements and information (collectively, “forward-looking statements”) within the meaning of applicable Canadian securities laws. Forward-looking statements are statements and information that are not historical facts, but rather financial projections and estimates, statements about plans, goals, intentions, intentions and expectations with respect to future business, operations, expansion to additional jurisdictions and language that contain Words such as “ongoing”, “estimates”, “expected” or the negative thereof or other variations thereof or similar terminology relating to future events or results, or that events or conditions “will”, “could”, “could” , or “should” occur or be achieved, or similar terminology relating to future events or results. Factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from any forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, delays in obtaining or failing to obtain required regulatory, environmental or other project approvals, political risks, uncertainties about the availability and cost of future funding requirements , Changes in the stock markets, inflation, changes in exchange rates, fluctuations in the price of raw materials and delays in the development of projects. Forward-looking statements are subject to significant risks and uncertainties and other factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from expected results. Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements are made as of the date of publication and the company assumes no responsibility to update or revise them to reflect new events or circumstances that are not required by law. The products, formulations, and schedules described herein are subject to change at any time.

For more information please contact:

Tinley Beverage Company Inc.
Ted Zittel
(310) 507-9146
relations@drinktinley.com
Twitter: @drinktinleys and @drinkbecketts
Instagram: @drinktinleys and @drinkbecketts
www.drinktinley.com
CSE: TNY; OTC: TNYBF

A photo accompanying this announcement is available at https://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/24a3ae7c-4f60-41e0-b327-7ab7c599f7ec

Watch Romelu Lukaku season his meat Salt Bae fashion as Chelsea striker visits celeb chef’s London restaurant

ROMELU LUKAKU switched from spicy shots to spice pots when he sprinkled his own steak in Salt Baes London restaurant.

The Chelsea striker copied the celebrity chef’s style when he added the finishing touches to his serving at the famously expensive restaurant.

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Nusret Gokce, aka Salt Bae, welcomed Chelsea superstar Romelu Lukaku backPhoto credit: Instagram / @nusr_et
Romelu Lukaku showed great concentration trying to replicate Salt Baes technique

2

Romelu Lukaku showed great concentration trying to replicate Salt Baes techniquePhoto credit: Instagram / @nusr_et

Lukaku and Strikepartner Timo Werner are up to date hurt after tearing up in the blues match against Malmö.

But that temporary blow aside, Lukaku’s first season of record buying is simmering well at Stamford Bridge as they lead Liverpool’s Premier League by one point.

And the Belgian superstar was enjoying the success of Chelsea when he met up again with Turkish chef Salt Bae – real name Nusret Gokce.

Lukaku wore black gloves as he carefully removed the steak ribs as if he were taking home a penalty in the lower corner.

And his face remained a study of concentration as he broke the meat and seasoned it from a plate held up by Nusret.

Lukaku kept his dreamy look of delight as he prepared for dinner.

But all in all, it was a case of Deja Chew .. or Deja Roo.

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That’s because it was a return visit for Lukaku AND just days after Wayne Rooney brought his family there.

In the distant days before the coronavirus pandemic – back in January 2019 – Lukaku joined two of his then Manchester United teammates at Salt Bae’s Nusr-Et Dubai restaurant.

And few could claim he has done much better since then than Anthony Martial, who still plays at United, and Andreas Pereira, who is now on loan from Old Trafford to Flamengo.

Jump back this week and United legend Rooney accompanied Ms. Coleen with her four sons.

Nusret posted snapshots when the six Rooneys posed next to a huge poster on which he sprinkled salt over a huge steak.

And for Derby boss Rooney, it was a nice change to dig into a steak when the Rams poke their teeth – as they support the championship table.

Read our Live blog about football news for the latest rumors, gossip and deals made

Larger restaurant wages whack earnings—some warn extra ache continues to be forward

Employees prepare orders for customers at a Chipotle Mexican Grill restaurant in Hollywood, California.

Patrick T. Fallon | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Customers are returning to restaurants in droves, but workers are not, putting even more pressure on fast food chains to hold market share and protect profits while navigating a tight labor market.

In the past two weeks, restaurant managers have painted a bleak picture of the personnel challenges investors face in their profit calls. CEOs like Domino’s Pizza Ritch Allison, Chipotle Mexican Grills Brian Nickol and MC Donalds Chris Kempczinski shared how restaurants have cut opening times, restricted ordering methods, and lost sales because they couldn’t find enough workers. Some chains have been hit harder by the labor shortage, such as Brands International’s restaurant Popeyes, that saw about 40% of its dining rooms closed due to lack of staff.

“Here we separate the wheat from the chaff,” says Kevin McCarthy, an analyst at Neuberger Berman.

Raising wages is a popular approach to personnel problems, although not a perfect solution. McDonald’s wages at its franchise restaurants have risen about 10% so far this year to attract workers. Higher labor costs have resulted in higher menu prices, up about 6% year over year, according to McDonald’s executives.

Starbucks plans to spend around $ 1 billion on improving services for its baristas in fiscal 2021 and 2022, including two planned wage increases. The decision reduced the earnings forecast for fiscal year 2022, disappointing investors and save $ 8 billion in market cap. McCarthy believes, however, that more companies should take a page out of the company’s playbook and invest in their people.

“The stock is in the red, but I think they are a winner. Big step on your part, definitely the right decision in the long run,” he said.

McCarthy said he expected restaurant businesses to lose about 5 points in traffic due to staff shortages.

Looking ahead to the rest of 2021 and into 2022, most publicly traded restaurants expect the problem to persist for at least a few more quarters. Texas Roadhouse CEO Gerald Morgan told analysts on Thursday that there are “a bit” more people in the pool of applicants, but he still believes there is still a long way to go before the company has enough people to meet demand.

Mark Kalinowski, founder of Kalinowski Equity Research, said executives at privately owned restaurant companies are more pessimistic about the timing of the labor market recovery.

“When high-ranking people in private companies say it is getting worse, it usually is,” Kalinowski said.

He has slashed estimates for Starbucks’ fiscal 2022 results and Domino’s U.S. revenue growth for the next quarter, according to the company’s latest earnings reports.

“Not every company will inevitably see a change in its sales forecast, but the margin side has to be considered more closely, especially for concepts that have 100% company-owned locations in the US or are primarily company transactions,” said Kalinowski.

Kalinowski said he prefers stocks with a higher concentration of franchise restaurants. McDonald’s, for example, only operates 5% of its US locations, while the rest is operated by franchisees.

More restaurant income is still ahead. Owner of an outback steakhouse Bloomin ‘brands, Wing stop and Applebees owners Your brands and IHOP parents Your brands are among the companies expected to release their latest results next week. Some analysts, like Wedbush Securities’s Nick Setyan, have revised their estimates in light of earnings reports from peer companies.

Inflation, labor and delta variant hit restaurant homeowners, Goldman Sachs information finds

Restaurants across the county have been looking forward to the economy reopening in recent months as Covid vaccines continued to spread and pent-up consumer demand was felt.

But headwinds from supply chain interruptions to labor shortages and rising costs hit the industry as the contagious Delta variant tarnishes hopes of a return to normal.

Small business owners in the food, restaurant and hospitality sectors are more concerned than most about the ongoing disruption of the pandemic, according to new data from Goldman Sachs’ 10,000 Small Business Voices program. The data shows that 84% of owners in these sectors are concerned about the impact of rising Covid-19 infection rates on businesses, compared to 75% of the entire small business population.

Almost all of them saw an increase in operating costs, with 93% believing that inflationary pressures have increased since June, negatively affecting finances.

The data subset of 117 food, restaurant and hospitality owners came from a broader survey of 1,145 participants in the Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses program earlier this month.

The numbers underscore the continuing pressures restaurants face even in an economy recovering from the worst of the damage caused by the coronavirus. While the introduction of vaccines and looser public health restrictions have brought the industry closer to normal, challenges remain as restaurant owners look to fall.

Ruby Bugarin, who runs Margaritas and Pepe restaurants in the greater Los Angeles area, said both the availability of goods and the higher cost hit her business. Products like crabs are harder to find, the cost of chicken and pork has increased by more than $ 1 a pound, and the prices of other goods have increased.

“In the past two or three weeks, the price of avocados has gone from about $ 40 a box to $ 85 a box. So that’s more than double, ”said Bugarin, a member of the Small Business Voices program. “We can’t do the same to our customers – we raise prices once or twice a year.”

Labor costs are also rising in her two restaurants with a total of 63 employees. Bugarin said she would like to add a chef or two at each location, but instead pays overtime weekly to her current staff.

Restaurant, hospitality and hospitality owners like Bugarin are also more affected by work problems than in the wider small business community. The data shows that 79% of these business owners say the challenges for employees have worsened since the pandemic, compared with 64% overall.

Recent data from the National Federation of Independent Business underscores the labor law issues that weigh on the optimism of small businesses. The vacancies in August were above the historic 48-year average for the second month in a row.

“In June, despite inflation and despite labor challenges, 67% of small businesses said they believed the US is on the right track,” said Joe Wall, national director of Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses Voices. “That number is now 38%. The delta variant is sure to be the # 1 issue in terms of sentiment change, and then you pile on it, inflation dynamics and the challenges facing the workforce.”

With the pandemic taxing restaurant operators, Goldman’s data shows that nearly 40% of food and hospitality companies say they expect they’ll need to take out a loan or line of credit for their business this fall or winter. This corresponds to 29% of the companies as a whole.

The Small Business Administration recently announced a revision of the Economic Injury Disaster Loan program for businesses. The credit limit will be increased to $ 2 million and recipients will be allowed to use the funds to prepay business debts, which allows restaurants to use the money on business debts and more.

“At a time when small business restaurants still have extreme working capital needs, these changes will improve the prospects for thousands of operators and improve the economic prospects for communities large and small,” said Sean Kennedy, executive vice president of public policy at the National Restaurant Association said in a statement. The group worked with the SBA on the new small business terms.

Beyond these changes, small business and restaurant owners and advocates have urged lawmakers to top up the $ 28.6 billion restaurant revitalization fund. It granted grants to the industry but was quickly exhausted due to high demand.

“We were able to distribute it to over 100,000 companies across the country, but demand was 2.5 times as much,” SBA administrator Isabel Guzman told CNBC about the RRF last month. “There are still restaurants, food and beverage companies that need support. We know they have been hardest hit, and will often be the last to reopen in communities, but they define so many of our main streets.I can’t say exactly what the actions of Congress will be, but the SBA would be ready to take these Manage programs quickly, efficiently and fairly. “

Native New Orleans type restaurant raises funds for Hurricane Ida

SAN DIEGO (KGTV) – Southern hospitality and those who offer it always have something special about them.

“I was born and raised in New Orleans. I’ve lived there for 25 years, ”said Andrew Boyer, owner of NOLA on Jan.

Boyer picked up his draw after living in the 504 and later traded it for the 619. When he saw the devastation that Category 4 Hurricane Ida wreaked havoc on his old turf, there was pain for Crescent City.

“I went back to Katrina and I was the devastation and I saw the heartache, basically the depression, and that kind of reminded me of it,” Boyer said.

He wanted to help after Ida swept his home state.

“I listen to my friends; we have no water, we have no electricity,” said Boyer.

So, Boyer’s Restaurant serves up jambalaya, gumbo, etouffee, and more from its New Orleans Comfort menu for charity.

“All items sold, we not just give the proceeds, we will give 50 percent of the sales to the Cajun Navy and the American Red Cross.”

NOLA on May 5th is making this Labor Day weekend appeal to all of their hungry customers looking for their own taste of bayou.

“We left Grace two weeks ago and we know how it was. And I know how influenced people are, ”said Ashley Renae, a customer. “So we wanted to come out, get good food and support them. “

“Any money we can give to help people would be fantastic,” said Jaqi Price, another customer.

It’s a sight that Boyer is overjoyed at. Proof that there is nothing a bowl of gumbo cannot fix.

“To see people who have no connection with Louisiana giving money and so we are here to eat, it is just touching. It just means that people really care, ”Boyer said.

NOLA said on the 5th that the fundraising effort will also apply to takeaway orders of their New Orleans Comfort Food. Customers can call them to place your order for a good cause.

They’re also doing a pass-the-pot event for the LSU game on Saturday to raise funds for their fundraising effort.

New Orleans-Impressed Restaurant in San Diego Goals to Increase Cash for Hurricane Ida Reduction – NBC 7 San Diego

San Diego is a long way from Louisiana, but a Hillcrest restaurant keeps the New Orleans community up for victims through a fundraiser Hurricane Ida.

NOLA On 5. – located at 3683 5th Ave., south of Pennsylvania Avenue – is working with the American Red Cross Thursday to raise funds for Ida relief efforts. From September 2nd to 5th, daily from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m., the restaurant will donate 50% of sales of its New Orleans Comfort Food menu to the American red cross.

A Hurricane Katrina survivor who now lives in San Diego recalls the storm and worries about the aftermath of Hurricane Ida. Allie Raffa from NBC 7 reports.

You see, the co-owner of the New Orleans-inspired restaurant – Andrew Boyer – is a retired New Orleans resident and wants to do what he can to help after Ida’s devastation.

“Our thoughts go with those affected by Ida and the entire Louisiana community,” said a message posted on Restaurant Instagram feed.

Hurricane Ida left a lot of damage in Lafourche Parish, Louisiana – devastating buildings and roads.

On Saturday, a local chapter of Louisiana State University alumni will participate in the restaurant’s fundraiser; the alumni will also collect money for Ida aid during the LSU vs. UCLA soccer game from 5:30 p.m.

NOLA On 5th specializes in Louisiana dishes such as catfish, po’boys, Mediterranean style lobster and chicken. Jambalaya, Gumbo, red beans, and rice are also on the menu.

Ida swept through Louisiana on Sunday, leaving New Orleans without power.

To learn more about how to donate directly through the American Red Cross to Hurricane Ida relief efforts, Click here.

Hurricane Ida: What You Should Know

Hurricane Ida landed on August 29th – the 16th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina. A few days later hundreds of thousands of Louisians were braising with no electricity, no tap water and little gasoline.

Ida was the fifth strongest hurricane hit the US and its devastation continues to be widespread. More than 1 million Homes and businesses in Louisiana and Mississippi were left without power. At some point New Orleans fell into complete darkness.

The death toll rose dramatically through Thursday as remains of the Hurricane Ida devastated the northeastern United States with record-breaking rains and floods.

Police said nine people died in New York City and 14 confirmed deaths in New Jersey. Check out the latest updates on Ida-related deaths Here.

In the meantime, President Joe Biden will visit Louisiana on Friday to assess the aftermath and speak to local and state leaders.

On Thursday, the president spoke about his administration’s efforts to protect the areas hit by Hurricane Ida (as well as those affected by Caldor fire in the Sierra Nevada near Lake Tahoe).

“We’re all sticking together,” said Bide. “The nation is here to help.”

President Joe Biden described his administration’s efforts to provide federal aid to competing climate crises in the United States, including historic floods from Hurricane Ida in the southern and eastern states and the devastating Caldor Fire in Sierra Nevada. “We’re all in the same boat. The nation is here to help.”

Seattle restaurant raises cash, gives assist for Afghan refugees

Kabul Afghan Cuisine is working to donate money and support those fleeing Taliban-controlled Afghanistan.

SEATTLE – A local company tries to raise funds to help refugees as tensions escalate over the airlift in Afghanistan.

The owners of the Kabul restaurant in Wallingford said they are desperate about what happened and will donate 10% of the money that is received to help the groups that work directly with refugees.

You support the work of Afghan health initiative and groups like Medical missions of the SCM. “We had to do something,” said restaurant owner Yama Khairzada.

Khairzada’s father immigrated from Afghanistan in the 1970s, and the restaurant felt it needed to reach out to the people who came from there.

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Medical missions of the SCM has been working with refugees from areas such as Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan for years.

The group collects money and helps distribute goods to refugees. SCM recently sent a letter to Donors asking for help for Afghan refugees and they are connecting with those who have already arrived.

On Friday, volunteers brought household donations to a family in Tukwila who arrived with only a few items of clothing for their three daughters.

They work with other non-profit organizations trying to help families with culturally sensitive foods.

This week’s attacks add even more trauma to the grief refugees are feeling. The attacks have made it even more difficult to get in touch with relatives who are still in Afghanistan.

Americans and US allies, including Afghans who helped US forces during the war in Afghanistan, fled the now Taliban-controlled country via Kabul airport before the August 31 deadline.

The last day or so has the airlift began to unwind while the US allies complete their own evacuation mission.

A protest in solidarity with Afghanistan and those who fled Taliban rule is planned in Seattle on Saturday.