How HIV analysis paved the best way for the Covid mRNA vaccines

Every December 1st, the world commemorates those who died of an AIDS-related illness. Known as World AIDS Day, it is a reminder that there has been an ongoing pre-Covid pandemic for the past 40 years.

The Covid vaccines were sequenced, developed and approved in record time in the US, but that would not have been possible without decades of work by HIV researchers.

“Almost everyone who works on Covid vaccines is from the HIV world,” said Mitchell Warren, executive director of AVAC, a global advocacy group for HIV prevention. “Moderna had been working on an mRNA-based HIV vaccine before it was even known that SARS-CoV-2 existed.”

An HIV vaccine has escaped scientists for decades. The traditional way of thinking about vaccines is to mimic the body’s natural immune response to a virus. The problem with HIV is that the body’s natural immune response isn’t strong enough to fight the virus. This means that a vaccine needs to address the problem in a different way. Scientists hope mRNA technology – the same technology used in Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech’s Covid vaccines – could be a tipping point.

Government funding is an integral part of all vaccine research and development. In just a few months, Operation Warp Speed ​​provided $ 10 billion for Covid vaccine research and development. In contrast, between 2000 and 2020, the US government contributed $ 12 billion to research and development of HIV vaccines. These funds often go to private companies.

“Almost every vaccine we get today was developed by a private company, although the actual research and development may have been a joint venture,” said Dr. Jeffrey Harris, Co-Founder of the HIV Vaccine Trials Network.

Public-private partnerships can have a serious impact on who makes a profit and who ultimately gets access to the vaccine. Moderna and the National Institutes of Health are currently locked in a lawsuit on a key patent for the Moderna Covid vaccine.

Watch the video above to learn what the success of Covid mRNA vaccines means for HIV and who would benefit from an HIV vaccine.

Fauci says Rand Paul ‘egregiously incorrect’ about acquire of operate analysis

White House Chief Medical Adviser Anthony Fauci makes an open statement prior to the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions hearing on “Next Steps: The Path for the COVID-19 Response” on Capitol Hill in Washington, USA, November 4, 2021.

Elizabeth Frantz | Reuters

The Chief Medical Advisor to the White House, Dr. Anthony Fauci and Senator Rand Paul exchanged views on Paul’s claims that the National Institutes of Health are supporting the acquisition of functional research in Wuhan, China, at a Senate hearing Thursday.

Paul urged Fauci to resign, accusing the NIH of funding research in Wuhan that experimented with existing pathogens to make them more contagious in hopes of understanding future infectious diseases. Fauci called Paul’s question a “egregious misrepresentation” and rejected the theory that Covid-19 came from a laboratory.

“I feel very uncomfortable having to say something, but he’s tremendously wrong in what he says,” said Fauci of Paul.

Fauci and Paul, the Junior Republican Senator from Kentucky, have clashed repeatedly during past Senate hearings. Paul previously accused Fauci of lying to Congress during a hearing about the gain of functional research on the 20th of July.

Paul claimed Thursday that the EcoHealth Alliance, a nonprofit organization funded by the NIH, developed a disease that doesn’t exist in nature by combining viruses in a laboratory. Fauci responded that Paul’s allegations did not match the NIH’s definition of gaining functional research, adding that he disagreed with Paul’s claim that the coronavirus leaked from a lab for the first time in 2019.

Senator Rand Paul (R-KY) questions the Director of the National Institute for Allergies and Infectious Diseases, Anthony Fauci, during a Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions hearing about the ongoing response to the COVID-19 pandemic at the Dirksen Senate office Buildings on Capitol Hill on November 04, 2021 in Washington, DC.

Chip Somodevilla | Getty Images

“Nobody claims that the viruses released by the Chinese are Covid,” said Paul. “What we are saying is that this was a risky kind of research. Gaining functional research, it was risky to share with the Chinese, and that Covid may have originated from an as-yet-to-be-revealed virus.”

Paul claimed the definition of function gains research changed on the NIH website, but Fauci said the definition used by the agency was developed over the course of more than two years before being formalized by the White House on science and technology policy in January became 2017.

“You’re not going to admit it’s dangerous, and because of that lack of judgment, I think it’s time you stepped back,” Paul said.

The National Intelligence Council published an assessment Last month on Covid-19 reported that the intelligence community “remains divided” on “the most likely origin” of the virus. US intelligence agencies are weighing two options, the report said: “natural exposure to an infected animal and a laboratory-related incident.”

The report also ruled out China making Covid as a biological weapon, adding that the Chinese government “likely had no prior knowledge” of the virus before the Wuhan Institute of Virology began isolating cases. However, in order to come to a formal conclusion about the origins of Covid, the researchers wrote that they would need “more transparency and cooperation from Beijing.”

“While we’re leaving all options open, it’s much more likely that this was a natural occurrence,” said Fauci.

Household elevating cash for analysis after daughter was identified with uncommon genetic dysfunction

CRESTVIEW, Fla. (WJHG / WECP) – At first glance, Carson Talbert looks like a normal, happy one-year-old, but was diagnosed with a rare genetic disorder when Carson was less than a month old.

“It’s called homocystinuria because of severe MTHFR deficiency,” said Grace Talbert, Carson’s mother. “There are only about 50 documented cases worldwide.”

Since her diagnosis, Carson has been on drugs that appear to help.

“There are little things my daughter should probably be doing but not doing,” Talbert. “Fortunately, she is really fine because she was diagnosed early and started medication early. Of all MTHFR-severe patients, it is one of the better cases. Fortunately, but that’s because she started medication after three weeks. “

However one fears that her mother has the unknown.

“Personally, I have never met an adult with it. I mostly see younger children so I don’t know what their life will be like as she gets older. There really is no one to compare it to, and there really is no one to compare to being diagnosed so early. “

HCU has no cure, but the Talbert family has started Fundraiser To raise money for research to hopefully find one one day.

“My daughters write homocystinuria because of severe MTHFR deficiency, no studies are ongoing,” said Talbert. “We hope that maybe a cure will be found in about 20 years, hopefully. But realistically this may not be the case, especially if there are no funds for research. “

Until a cure is found, her parents will do whatever they can to make Carson laugh and have fun with their big sister.

According to Carson’s parents, after their daughters were diagnosed, they were tested for HCU and discovered they were both carriers.

Copyright 2021 WJHG. All rights reserved.

Denver7 On a regular basis Hero bikes throughout the nation to boost cash for uncommon most cancers analysis

DENVER – Alec Fraser and Jamie Meehan will tell you the idea of ​​cycling nearly 5,000 miles like most good ideas do.

“One evening over a mug of beer we decided to drive across the country,” said Meehan.

The real inspiration was born in a Connecticut hospital decades earlier.

“Julian was a very special person,” said his father Alec.

Julian Fraser was a kid with a big smile and an even bigger heart. An all-American swimmer and college water polo player, his father said he was happy and healthy until he turned 19 and received a devastating diagnosis.

“He had osteosarcoma, a bone cancer that mostly affects children and adolescents,” said Alec. “Unfortunately at the time of diagnosis it had already metastasized and it was in 14 different parts of his body and he had a huge tumor in his abdomen.”

After years of tough battle, Julian lost his battle with cancer in 2017.

“They gave him very little chance of survival. I remember once he took me aside and said, ‘Dad, I don’t care what they say, I’ll hit this.’ And he just fought this disease with all his might, ”said Alec.

The two draw from this strength when they cycle Julian’s Honor from Connecticut to California. Her goal is to raise half a million dollars for Cycle for Survival, which funds research into rare cancers.

“Over 50% of people with cancer have some form of rare cancer, and yet only 4 cents of every dollar raised for cancer research goes to rare cancer research. So it’s very important to us, ”said Alec.

This week, Team JF made it to Colorado. A crowd of supporters accompanied her for long distances while the teenager was never far from her thoughts.

“I think of the fight Julian went through and the fights he had and there is a huge reservoir of commitment to keep it going and that’s why I think of him in the harder times that I drive” said Meehan.

Nothing will fill the hole Julian left, but Team JF hopes this ride to honor the teenager gives hope to those still struggling.

“I do that every now and then, of course I think of Julian and think of his life, great memories we had with Julian and the feeling, alright, he looks down at us and smiles at what we’re doing, so feels that look really good, “said Alec.

If you would like to donate to Cycle for Survival, visit their website.

Molly Hendrickson anchors at Denver7 from 4:30 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. It also features a different 7Everyday Hero on Denver7 every week. Follow Molly Facebook here and Twitter here. To appoint a hero in your life Click here.

Strolling To Elevate Cash & Consciousness For Childhood Most cancers Analysis In The Soo

“We are bringing awareness here and we hope to achieve more than that.”

Last year they ran 38 miles to raise $ 1,000 for childhood cancer research.

That year, the Crowns Against Cancer team walked downtown Sault Ste. Marie to raise more money and awareness.

Last year the Relay For Life team walked halfway around Chippewa County on the cause, this year an empty car went down Portage and Ashmun.

The car represents a child who died of cancer.

Volunteers say the people they met have been very generous.

“We have already received a lot of donations. Lots of people stopped here and then, both ways that we went, lots of people stopped us and asked us what we were doing today, so it was great, ”said Samantha Pomeroy, Team Crowns Against Cancer.

Anyone who missed the girls over the weekend can still donate to a good cause here.

Golf outing raises cash for childhood most cancers analysis

MIDDLETON (WKOW) – Golfers clicked the links on Thursday as part of a fundraiser to support cancer research in children.

Northwestern Mutual organized the sixth annual Driving Out Childhood Cancer Golf Cup at Middleton’s Pleasant View Golf Course.

“Despite the fact that thousands of children in the United States are diagnosed with cancer each year, only about 4% of national cancer funding goes to finding a cure for childhood cancer, raising money to find a cure,” said Sandy Botcher from Northwestern Mutual.

The event included a raffle and a live auction led by 27 sporting director Lance Veeser.

Elevating cash for pediatric mind most cancers analysis

WILKES-BARRE, Pennsylvania – A game night in Lucerne County had one purpose – to find a cure for pediatric brain cancer.

Little Eric’s Foundation hosted a casino night at the Holiday Inn near Wilkes-Barre.

Players played blackjack, poker, and roulette.

The Little Eric’s Foundation was founded by Eric and Jessica Speicher of West Pittston.

Her son, affectionately called Little E, passed away in 2013.

“People know why they’re here and what we’re doing it for, but to get out as a group and enjoy each other’s company again in an environment like this where people are having a good time, we all do it for one for good reason, “said Eric and Jessica Speicher.

All of the proceeds will go towards the travel and medical expenses of children currently undergoing cancer treatment.

13th annual ‘Driving For the Treatment’ charity golf match raises cash for most cancers analysis

LONGMEADOW, Massachusetts (WWLP) – In memory of their father, Tom Cosenzi, a car dealer in western Massachusetts, his son and daughter raised money for neuro-oncology research Tuesday.

Tom Cosenzi, founder of the TommyCar Auto Group, was only 52 years old when he died of a brain tumor in 2009. Since then, the Tom Cosenzi Driving For the Cure benefit golf tournament has raised more than $ 1 million.

Event calendar for the Hall of Fame Enshrinement announced

Daughter Carla Cosenzi spoke to 22News when more than 180 golfers started the 13th annual fundraiser on Tuesday: “It’s a very emotional day. It’s a day to remember my father, and my father’s, when many of our co-workers play as a family. It’s a day when we’re raising money for the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. “

Carla estimates that Tuesday Charity Golf at Twin Hills Country Club in Longmeadow raised nearly $ 100,000 for neuro-oncology research at Dana Farber.

Michio Kaku calls nuclear fusion check at nationwide lab ‘large step towards the holy grail of power analysis’

Theoretical physicist Michio Kaku praised a recent nuclear fusion experiment at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

“This is a huge step towards the holy grail of energy research,” said Kaku, professor of theoretical physics at City College and the City University of New York. “To break even, to gain more energy than you invest, and that could end up being a game changer.”

The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory announced a major achievement in nuclear fusion, the it had back on August 8th, was able to use 1.3 megajoules of energy at its National ignition system, albeit very briefly. Kaku told CNBCs “The news with Shepard Smith“that the achievement was a huge step towards clean energy.

“A fusion reactor is carbon neutral, it does not produce carbon dioxide, it does not produce large amounts of nuclear waste, which is found in nuclear fission plants with uranium, it does not melt,” said the author of “The God Equation: The Search for a Theory of Everything.” “The fuel is sea water, hydrogen from sea water could be the base fuel.”

merger, the lesser known and opposite reaction to fission, is when two atoms collide to form a heavier atom and release energy. This is how the sun generates energy.

Kaku explained some of the disadvantages of nuclear fusion and why it is not currently an easily accessible source of energy.

“It turns out that when you heat hydrogen to tens of millions of degrees Fahrenheit, the temperature of the sun, things get unstable, and so this reaction took place for over a hundred trillionth of a second, just a snap of your fingers, so in other words, us want to have a continuous flow of energy, not bursts of energy like we found here, “said Kaku.

West Hartford Group Raises Cash For Most cancers Analysis – NBC Connecticut

The Gastropark in West Hartford was transformed into a 1970s atmosphere for the Ball 4 a Cure Inc. fundraiser on Saturday night.

Seven elementary school friends founded five years ago Ball 4 a Cure Inc., an annual three-on-three charity basketball tournament in their hometown of West Hartford.

“It’s all about that aspect of bringing our community together. We have such a tightly knit community and West Hartford, and we want to keep bringing them together so that we can support Connecticut Children’s Hospital,” said Ball 4 a Cure founder Max Kraimer.

The group of boys usually host the tournament to raise funds for the oncology clinic at Connecticut Children’s Medical Center. But this year they decided to do a fundraiser in the park because of COVID-19.

Their annual basketball tournament is a community-wide event that attracts over 150 participants from around the world each year.

The group is getting close to its goal of raising $ 70,000 for cancer research.