Board Of Selectmen Discusses American Rescue Plan Cash

With a string of heavy spending and $ 7.6 million in American Rescue Plan (ARP) funds pending disbursement, the Board of Selectmen initiated a discussion on the possible use of the money on 4 selection meetings on Sept. 20.

Treasury director Robert Tait said the ARP paid out $ 1.56 billion to counties and cities and $ 3.93 billion to residents across the country. Of the $ 7.6 million in money, the city received half or $ 3.8 million this year and the other half will be available next year.

First Selectman Dan Rosenthal said that while the city is not required to provide formal funding for the issuance of ARP funds, he felt it would be better to follow the charter process in allocating the funds. Rosenthal thought it would create a paper trail in case the federal government questions how Newtown used the funds and show taxpayers how those funds were used.

“I think we should do this for the sake of transparency,” said Rosenthal. “That’s the most sensible thing, so everything is recorded. That’s the best way. “

Rosenthal felt that one of the better uses for the funding was the Hawley HVAC project, which along with expected ties will be funded in part by a school board surplus. Using the grant for something that would otherwise bind the city would save the city money in interest. Rosenthal said it was important for voters to know how much of the project would be paid for using the grant if asked for project approval in November.

“Using this will save us on retention costs – it’s a smart financial decision,” said Selectman Jeff Capeci.

If voters don’t approve of the Hawley Project, ARP funds can be used elsewhere. Rosenthal said it was “important to get the ball rolling” on how much to spend on the Hawley Project so it can go through the Finance Committee and Legislative Council in time to vote on November 2nd election day Voters to come.

The city has until December 21, 2024 to allocate funds from the payout and spend an additional year thereafter. According to the U.S. Treasury Department, ARP funds from the city can be used to:

* Support public health spending by funding things like COVID-19 containment, medical spending, behavioral health care, and certain public health and safety workers.

* Address negative economic impacts caused by the public health emergency, including economic damage to workers, households, small businesses, affected industries and the public sector.

* Replace lost public sector revenue by using these funds to provide government services to the extent that revenue has declined due to the pandemic.

* Provision of bonus payments for key workers and additional support for those who have and will bear the greatest health risks as a result of their service in critical infrastructure sectors.

* Invest in water, sewer and broadband infrastructure and make the necessary investments to improve access to clean drinking water, support vital sewage and rainwater infrastructure and expand access to broadband internet.

“Within these overall categories, beneficiaries have great flexibility in deciding how best to use these funds to meet the needs of their communities,” the Treasury Department said on the website.

Rosenthal noted that the ARP requires that anything that funds are used for is not a “recurring item” – for example, a new position with a salary would not be an approved use of the money. All recurring items would have to be financed from the normal operating budget of the city in the coming years. In addition, ARP funding cannot be applied directly to budget as revenue to directly lower the milling rate.

Some other things the city could use the money on alongside the Hawley project are new WiFi routers in the community center and community center that select people said were working poorly; a new roof for the community center; and vehicle cameras for the police.

Rosenthal said all police cruisers have cameras, but the current ones are “starting to fail”.

“If we do some of these things with ARP funds, the operating budget is relieved,” said Rosenthal.

Other ideas included a terrace in the Community Center, a campus bike park in Fairfield Hills and a renovation of the Dickinson Park Pavilion for the Parks & Recreation Department.

“Those are a few ideas, there are sure to be more”, says Rosenthal.

The possibility of providing some form of grants to companies harmed by COVID-19 was also mentioned, but Rosenthal said this was a “management challenge”.

“What money do we give a company?” Asked Rosenthal. “How do we do this to maintain confidentiality, how do we not miss any people? I think it’s noble, but how do you do it in a fair way? “

Because of this, Rosenthal said he believed it was “better to do things that take the sting out of the mill rate”.

“When mill prices rise, companies and residents alike feel the sting,” says Rosenthal.

Rosenthal said it was best to use the ARP funds on items that will definitely end up in the operating budget, such as the police cameras, rather than on “wishlist items.”

“If the [federal] The government is shooting something, I don’t want to say: ‘Well, shoot, we wouldn’t have done that without the extra money,’ ”said Rosenthal.

Capeci said he wanted to “weigh the compromises,” and Rosenthal said he would continue to discuss the funds with Tait to “examine different scenarios and what the tie-up costs would look like”.

Reporter Jim Taylor can be reached at jim@thebee.com.

A lot of cash, a number of want: Council will get an replace on federal rescue funds

The US $ 39 million bailout has risen to nearly $ 60 million, all of which must be spent by the end of 2024, county council finance committee members learned Tuesday.

And that’s an estimated $ 168 million in public transportation, housing, public health programs, and direct assistance to residents and businesses in the form of rental and utility benefits, unemployment, economic checks, coronavirus testing and response, and other forms of government assistance.

It’s a big change for a county that often struggles to keep up with its commitments, noted Puna Councilor Ashley Kierkiewicz.

“I see – that’s kind of money in a generation,” said Kierkiewicz. “We had to pinch pennies for so long and now there are tens of millions out there.”

Finance director Deanna Sako tried to dampen the council’s spending enthusiasm.

Spending, Sako said, has to fit into very specific categories to qualify for federal funds. The district has to submit its first quarterly report to the federal government next month.

The money can be used for public health and tackling negative economic effects, especially in underserved areas.

“We make sure that all of these things we want to do actually fit into the categories we have,” said Sako. “That was a challenge.”

For example, the county is not qualified to use federal stimulus money to make up for lost public sector revenue because the county’s general fund has not taken a hit from the rise in property values. This is bad news for the Department of Water Supply, which is trying to make up $ 2.9 million in lost revenue from unpaid water bills.

“The county as a whole is fine, but that doesn’t help the water supply ministry,” said Sako.

Much of the money will go to water, sewer and broadband infrastructure alongside childcare so that people can be kept busy, especially as the tourism sector recovers.

“We want to be deliberate and wise on this piece,” said Doug Adams, director of research and development, who is looking for the best way to connect critical broadband networks and create childcare facilities for children under five. There are 12,000 children in that age group on the island, but only 3,600 childcare places, he said.

“We’re looking for ways to get people back to work,” he said. “If you want to see economic development, we have to make sure that our children are cared for.”

Hilo Councilor Sue Lee Loy urged the administration to reach out to nonprofits on the island to put together larger funding and grant packages to help the community.

“Over time, we’ve given a little to a lot of people and not really seen the effects,” said Lee Loy. “The nonprofits in our community are doing so much and it would be helpful if we could align them with these goals.”

Metropolis of Bentonville meets to debate American Rescue Plan cash allocation

BENTONVILLE, Ark. (KNWA / KFTA) – The city of Bentonville meets to discuss how to spend the American bailout money.

By September 7, Bentonville will have received half of its planned $ 6.9 million.

Some of the proposed projects are direct responses to the pandemic, such as increasing reserves of personal protective equipment, and others would use the funds for infrastructure projects such as upgrading the city’s water and electricity meters or protecting the city from ransomware attacks.

The Bentonville Police Chief announces his resignation

“It’s actually a requirement within the process, so we want to make sure we’re getting it right,” said Bentonville Mayor Stephanie Orman. “For us, our community is a community that has a can-do attitude and in order to have that, to work together, it is important to be able to listen to the public.”

The city has not held any votes but has had a better idea of ​​what to do when the time comes to vote on the allocation of that money.

Lucci’s Home Bully Rescue elevating cash by means of bike experience – WISH-TV | Indianapolis Information | Indiana Climate

INDIANAPOLIS (WISH) – Motorcyclists will be setting off on a ride in Southport on Sunday to help out local misfits.

The Mars Hill Charity Riders will take to the sidewalk to support Lucci’s House Bully Rescue.

Laurie Collins started Lucci’s House Bully Rescue after her dog died from being mistreated by a veterinarian.

“When [my dog] was killed, we promised no tyrant would be left and now we’re just trying to save as many worries as possible, “said Collins.

The group website says her mission is “to help as many pit bull breeds as possible and to clear up and prevent the widespread misconceptions about bully breeds. Lucci’s House will fight until no tyrant remains. “

The charity ride starts around noon. Registration begins at 10 a.m. at Southside Harley Davidson (4930 Southport Crossing Place).

If people can’t make it or don’t ride, they can still help by donate online.

In 2020, more than $ 7,000 was raised to help the group. The money raised on Sunday will help promote and pay the vet bills for pit bulls.

How Instagram star helped rescue dozens from Afghanistan | Your Cash

Dozens of desperate Afghans who wanted to flee the Taliban before the deadline for US withdrawal from Kabul expired on Tuesday came to safety with the help of an unexpected place: Instagram influencer Quentin Quarantino.

Quarantino is the alter ego of 25-year-old New York City-born Tommy Marcus, previously best known for his liberal memes and jokes about opponents of COVID-19 vaccinations. Along with his supporters, Quarantino raised $ 7 million through GoFundMe in a matter of days to launch rescue missions to Afghanistan to evacuate as many people as possible, many of whom said they were threatened by the Taliban.

On Wednesday, their Operation Flyaway mission helped transfer 51 people from Afghanistan to Uganda on a privately chartered plane funded by the GoFundMe campaign.

More than 121,000 people had donated to the campaign after Marcus appealed to his 832,000 supporters, making it one of the largest humanitarian fundraisers in GoFundMe history.

“It is more than humiliating that they have this confidence in me, that they are willing to put significant sums of money into the hands that I trust,” Marcus told The Associated Press.

Saraya International, a global development company, and the Rockefeller Foundation, both of which provided organizational support for the flight to Uganda, as well as another company involved in the evacuation, confirmed to the AP that the flight was different from that of Marcus. funded emergency collaboration was chartered ‘Go FundMe Campaign.

“I don’t know what word to use other than miracle because it restored faith in humanity,” said Marcus. “We have overcome the political divisions in this situation and have really come together from all walks of life to unite and save these people because … they do not deserve what their future holds if they stay in Afghanistan now.”

According to Marcus, women, children, humanists and others “who have long been fighting for the common good in Afghanistan” and their families were evacuated. The organizers had stated that they wanted to save 300 people who, along with their families, were “in imminent danger of being executed by the Taliban”.

The team had met skepticism from experts who questioned whether they could undertake such a mission at a time when governments, corporations and charities were taking their citizens and employees out of Afghanistan in all sorts of aircraft.

Marcus’ group said more than 350 people were rescued, with nearly 300 leaving Kabul on other charter flights reimbursed by Operation Flyaway for safe passage out of the country. A State Department spokesperson wrote in a statement emailed that the department values ​​”community-led efforts in support of the Afghan resettlement and relocation process that reflects the generosity of the American people and the international community.”

“However, we are unable to verify the authenticity or effectiveness of these efforts,” the statement said.

Officials from several non-profit groups describe a chaotic and dangerous scene at Kabul airport as they rushed to fill private charter flights with people who, in limited time, have the necessary papers to keep their planes on the tarmac.

“I am so proud of our exceptional team and what we have achieved in such a short amount of time,” said Scott Shadian, CEO of Sayara. “I just wish we could have done more. It breaks my heart how much more we could have achieved. We are grateful that despite the greatest adversity we have ever faced, we have managed as many people as we have.

At the request of the US government, Uganda received the evacuees, who will be staying in hotels in a city outside the state capital, Kampala. Uganda officials said the nation will host up to 2,000 people who are expected to be relocated after being temporarily in the country.

The charter flight, which left Kabul early Wednesday morning, is one of several private rescue operations organized individually and in cooperation by various groups to help Afghans escape. The flight from Kabul to Entebbe, Uganda, was organized by Sayara, who told a company working with Marcus that she knew of an airplane for Operation Flyaway.

Representatives from North Carolina-based Raven Advisory said they could pay for the mission with funds raised through Marcus’ GoFundMe campaign. The company, which claims to be subcontracted to the US military, said “an all-volunteer team made up of former Special Forces soldiers and other veterans with experience in Afghanistan” are working with the military to coordinate their rescue efforts.

Sayaras Shadian said he only met members of Operation Flyaway on Zoom earlier this week and, amid the chaos of the evacuations from Kabul, was thrilled that they agreed to finance the flight.

“You were one of the many miracles we have witnessed during this time,” said Shadian. “Your last minute funding, along with the generous support of the Rockefeller Foundation, Schmidt Futures, and other donors, was vital. Without the quick funding for Operation Flyaway, this flight would not have started. “

Raven Advisory CEO Sheffield Ford told the AP that in order to get people to the airport, the US government “has to be content with our organization saying that these people are fine and that they are actually doing things have done to help their country, to help ”. our country.”

Though Thursday’s fatal airport suicide attack hampered their efforts, Ford says those they help must have a passport, a relative his group can communicate with, and someone to vouch for them who has passed a background check . The goal, according to Ford, is to get Afghan citizens targeted by the Taliban out of the country.

“Our focus was on the people who wanted to make something great out of their country,” he said. “They thought they would stay there for the long term, with our support. There will be women in journalism and teachers. It could be the young and the elderly who have spoken out very openly against the various atrocities committed by the Taliban in the past. “

While crowdfunding is a welcome tool for raising funds in times of crisis, Patricia McIlreavy, president of the Washington-based Center for Disaster Philanthropy, emphasizes that donors should be careful when donating through these websites for private purposes.

“There will not necessarily be a public record of where this money went and how it was used, as a nonprofit – or a 501 (c) (3) – is required by law,” she said.

Although the rescue flights are now suspended with the outstanding deadline for the US withdrawal from Afghanistan, the GoFundMe campaign said it will donate the remaining money to the Washington-based International Women’s Media Foundation. According to the organizers, the foundation, which supports women journalists, wants to use the money to “work with experienced organizations and experts to support people as soon as they are on safe ground”.

Ford was impressed with how quickly GoFundMe raised millions for these missions.

“It’s about people coming together to help others,” he said. “And it was great to see that.”

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The Associated Press is supported by the Lilly Foundation for coverage of philanthropy and nonprofits. The AP is solely responsible for all content.

Wolves in Idaho, Montana could get federal oversight

Ector County commissioners focus on American Rescue Plan Act cash

ODESSA, Texas (KOSA) – As the coronavirus continues to spread, Ector County’s commissioners are making decisions on how federal funds will be distributed.

Tuesday morning commissioners heard from eight different groups requesting part of the American rescue plan – and it wasn’t just hospitals.

Groups like the Odessa Volunteer Fire Brigade and the ISD of Ector County together with ORMC and MCH.

The medical center is calling for $ 7 million for medical equipment and hospital staff.

And over in the county, some are calling for the funds to be used for infrastructure like roads and water.

Commissioners say they are looking at the best way to prioritize federal funding with community needs.

District Two Commissioner Greg Simmons said the court will start compiling a list but the decision will be difficult.

“We want to prioritize and make sure that most of the people are positively impacted with the money,” said Simmons. Again, healthcare is an important part of our community and we want to make sure that the hospitals have the necessary resources but also have different sources available so we cannot focus on that because it is other areas like water in different ones Districts that have got into a crisis mode. “

Commissioner Simmons said there was no real timetable in about 90 days – the court could start considering how the money should be spent.

Commissioners say Ector County has a year to explain where the funds will go.

Copyright 2021 KOSA. All rights reserved.

Columbia Metropolis Council considers concepts for American Rescue Plan cash

COLOMBIA, Mon. (KMIZ)

Columbia City Council pondered how to spend $ 25 million received from the federal government.

The discussion came as the council prepares to vote on its budget for fiscal year 22. Funds from the American Rescue Plan make up a small percentage of the money the council must garner, but many have urged the council to invest in areas it frequently does not invest in while fighting the COVID-19 pandemic.

The council discussed how to use the money to fight homelessness in the city. Citizens’ surveys have shown that housing construction is a priority for consideration. The draft plan prepared by city officials for ARPA funding shows that $ 3 million will be spent on this issue. The Voluntary Action Center has asked for ARPA funds to help with its Opportunity Campus for people affected by homelessness, including shelter. The group said it would take $ 5 million to get it established.

The council members discussed how best to use this money. Mayor Brian Treece said $ 3 million could be too expensive. He said the city needs to ensure that whatever it has spent money on produces results in solving the problem.

“I think there are some unique needs that I think the city should be a partner on,” said Treece. “And I think the county has to be a partner and I think the private sector has to be a partner.”

First ward councilwoman Pat Fowler said the city needs to spend enough money to make the program in which it has invested successful. So did other urban ARPA investment ideas, including mental health services and community violence prevention.

“Now if we put extra strain on a nameless person to make all of these connections and bring all of these things together, the chances are they’ll fall apart,” said Fowler.

City Manager John Glascock revealed his plan for spending at a news conference on July 29th. The $ 474 million budget includes a 3 percent raise for all employees and the creation of 38 new jobs in the city. The government is still cutting back on staff cuts that were cut in 2020 due to the coronavirus pandemic. Glascock said the city is in “good financial condition” and expects to raise $ 443 million for the fiscal year beginning October 1.

The Council held its first public hearing on the budget on August 16. He will hold two more hearings, scheduled for September 7th and September 20th, before possibly voting on September 20th.

The health department also asked for more money to keep some temporary positions. Deputy Director Scott Clardy said the department must hire investigators on the case to deal with the COVID-19 pandemic because of the recent surge caused by the Delta variant. Clardy said the $ 1.2 million needed would also be paid for through grants and the county.

Native veterans elevating cash to rescue Afghans left behind

A local initiative is raising money to rescue interpreters and others who helped American troops in Afghanistan.

ISSAQUAH, Washington – A local attempt to raise money to rescue interpreters and others who helped American forces in Afghanistan is made difficult by the chaos in Kabul.

“There is no way to describe the deep feelings of sadness, loss, and fear we feel for the people in hiding,” said Matthew Griffin, a former Army Ranger.

Griffin and Greg Adams, a former Green Beret, founded one Fundraiser Early summer to save an interpreter named Moneer.

Moneer and his wife recently secured a visa that will keep them safe in the UK. They have been there for two weeks and have watched their home collapse.

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“While we may be exhausted, tired, or frustrated, it is our duty to come back and help as many others as possible,” said Griffin.

He and Adams are now trying to help other interpreters and their families escape on commercial flights.

The United States government has been working to relocate Afghans who have helped the United States. But the collapse of the Afghan government means many are left now where they could be targeted by the Taliban.

“The feelings we feel are tragic, but they are predictable. It’s something we’ve all felt for a long time after you’ve struggled there. We believe that this result was inevitable and it is unfortunate that it was a reality became.” said Griffin.

8-year-old cousins elevate cash at celebration for Beverly-Waterford Rescue Squad

BEVERLY, OH (WTAP) – Do you remember your 8th birthday? Chances are it wasn’t like the birthday party these two Warren cousins ​​had recently.

Silas Stephan and Koby Hall received a shipload of cash for their birthday last weekend. But the money wasn’t for her. It was for the Beverly Waterford Rescue Team.

“We made a decision to donate to the rescue team to help our community,” said Koby.

The boys presented their $ 300 today to Debbie Miller and Anna Offemberger from the rescue team. Both boys say they are shocked at the amount they have raised.

“After we counted all the money… I started crying. It was amazing, it was amazing, ”said Silas.

“It was so incredible,” Koby repeated.

And the team was overjoyed to receive the money.

“I was speechless because you don’t see the little guys that way,” said Miller.

“To know that we have made a difference any more than they are. But that’s what we do in a small town. This community is lucky, we are lucky to be here as a group, where everyone is so interested. “

Miller says they will notify the boys as soon as they know what the money will be used for. She says they’re also running a fundraiser for the Beverly Fire Department. They sell raffle tickets for a four-wheeler and an ATV in the department. The raffle winners will be announced on Sunday, August 22nd at the Waterford Fair.

Copyright 2021 WTAP. All rights reserved.

Bonuses, spending of American Rescue Plan cash, stay sticking level in new Mayfield Heights union contracts

MAYFIELD HEIGHTS, Ohio – The city council did not approve a new contract for the service department on Monday, July 12th, but like previous union deals that also received no approval from the council this year, it will come into effect soon.

The council voted 3-3 (with Council President Diane Snider abstaining because her husband is a police officer) in the vote on the service contract. As negotiated by the city and the departmental union, the new contract provides for a salary increase of 2.5 percent and a one-off bonus in each of the three years (starting retroactively in January). The bonus is 4 percent of each employee’s salaries in 2020. The contract is similar to the contracts signed by police and fire service unions earlier this year. Traditionally, non-union city workers in Mayfield Heights receive the same raise as union workers.

Although the council did not approve the contract approved by the administration, state law provides that the contract with the service department will come into effect within 30 days of the contract being signed.

As it was the fall in May With the contracts for police and fire brigade, city councilor Gayle Teresi was supported by councilors Robert DeJohn and Donald Manno against the service contract. The service department contract is the last to be billed.

“We’re all in favor of everyone getting a raise,” Teresi said when she was contacted on July 15. “Our service department, our fire brigade and our police are great – we are not taking that away. It’s just that when we (council and administration) spoke at the beginning, just before the contracts were approved, it said (workers) would get a lump sum and it came back 2.5 (percent) and a lump sum every year . That wasn’t what we talked about, we either talked about it, or we did.

“If you make $ 80,000 (per year) you will make $ 3,200 more,” she said of the bonus. “But our directors make more than $ 80,000. Some make $ 120,000 or more. “

The city expects $ 1.8 million this year and the same amount as its share of the federal rescue plan (ARP) in 2022. Mayor Anthony DiCicco said the bonus money will be paid thanks to city workers who continued to work during the pandemic. The ARP money can be used to pay for the bonuses that DiCicco said will total around $ 350,000. The bonuses, he said, are only paid once.

Instead of spending the money on bonuses, Teresi would like to see the money spent to help the residents.

“There are many elderly (residents) with permanent home incomes who cannot fix the driveway if they are cited by the building authorities,” she said. “You can’t put a new roof on. You’re from Social Security. They just don’t have the money so why don’t we help them? Let’s just do something for the residents and give our employees 2.5 percent for three years. “

Teresi said it would also help the city help residents modernize their homes.

“And when that elderly person is gone – moves, sold, dies, God forbid – their house would be in better shape to be sold.”

Speaking of the city’s desire to use the ARP money for bonuses, she said, “It’s like a kid in a candy store – you know you get this (ARP) money, so we’ll just spend it.”

The July 12 meeting included residents from Marnell Avenue ask the city for help with their flooded basements. A problem that residents have been discussing with the city administration for several years.

“These people came to the meeting (to make complaints),” Teresi said. “One woman spent $ 63,000 keeping water out of her basement. She waterproofed her entire house. We made Dye testing last March and by now (the city) should have figured it out (flooding problems). So let’s do something for the residents. It’s (ARP) free money, ”Teresi said.

“Let’s take something from the plate. Let’s help the elderly. Let’s help our housing stock or our own home. Let’s fix the sewers. These people cannot sell their houses. Some of them, their insurance company, are no longer taking damage because they have had so many claims. ”Teresi said there are other homes in the area that have also been hit by floods, including those on Ascot and Bellingham streets.

Regarding spending the ARP money, DiCicco said, “We’re still talking about what we’re going to do with it. The sewers, we’ve got to find out what’s going on with the sewers over there. Dan Gerson, our city engineer, found some leaks between the rainwater and the sewer system during the main paint tests. So something needs to be fixed.

“I think it was about $ 300,000 worth of repairs. It’s good. We’ll go ahead and do this, but testing still needs to be done to find out exactly what needs to be done before we invest any money. We intend to fix whatever we find there. This (ARP) money can be used for this. “

DiCicco went on to say that the cash for the employee bonuses can come from the ARP fund or from the city’s general fund.

“We also have money to fix the sewer problems. It’s just a matter of figuring out what needs to be done. It’s not like you can’t do one thing and can’t do the other. We are in a sufficiently good position to carry out the (sewer) repairs and still take care of our employees. “

In other news

More news from the July 12th Council meeting:

– A request for acceptance of bids for Asphalting the entire Woodhawk Drive stayed on the table. DiCicco said it is still unclear whether the surface renewal will happen this year.

– During a full committee meeting on July 12th, the advice was heard from representatives from LevelHEADS Inc., an architectural firm that is working with the urban engineer GPD Group in hiring a site manager for the upcoming community center / pool project on Marsolstrasse. A very early concept of a plan was shown to the council.

“This is a very preliminary (rendering) that we saw,” DiCicco said. “They showed us what they can do. The building may not look like this when it’s built. But I liked the overall layout because the buildings are between the freeway (I-271) and the pool to shield (the pool) from the freeway.

“I think the general layout will stay the same, but now that we have chosen a site manager and set the budgets, we need to know exactly what the building will look like and what amenities we want. ”

The plan is now to demolish the current community center and build the new one a little further west on today’s parking lot. It is not yet known whether the new community center will be a story or two high.

– There were also points for planning and building Sheetz and Raising Cane’s Chicken Fingers on the Mayland Shopping Center site, which is currently being redeveloped on Mayfield Road.

“They were filed because they both need parking exemptions from the Board of Zoning Appeals,” DiCicco said. “I think it would be better if you go to the zoning board of appeal first so they can make a decision and then the council can act.”

Both companies, DiCicco said, are definitely coming to Mayland. In the case of Sheetz, a gas station that also includes a grocery store and a coffee / sandwich shop, plans have been changed so that the gas pumps cannot be seen from Mayfield Road, but located behind, at the request of local residents the building.

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