WEF report warns of Covid inequalities fueling social tensions

Protesters hold up a banner reading “Covid slave ticket” as they protest against the mandatory vaccination campaign against SARSCoV2, Belgium.

Thierry Monasse | Getty Images News | Getty Images

New research by the organizers of the annual meeting in Davos in the Swiss Alps warn of inequalities due to the Coronavirus Pandemic that could spark domestic and cross-border tensions around the world.

This year’s Global Risks Report from the World Economic Forum describes a “global divergence” – where poorer countries have much lower Covid-19 vaccination rates and therefore have longer-lasting economic problems.

“Covid-19 and its economic and societal consequences continue to pose a critical threat to the world. Vaccine inequality and the resulting uneven economic recovery risk exacerbating social rifts and geopolitical tensions,” the report said on Tuesday.

“The resulting global divergence will create tensions – within and across borders – that could exacerbate the cascading effects of the pandemic and complicate the coordination needed to address common challenges.”

Aside from the catastrophic death toll, one of the most immediate effects of the coronavirus pandemic has been the resulting increase in inequality, many economists said. They found that many people have faced job insecurity or were unable to attend online training due to bans.

Richer countries used to have access to Covid-19 vaccines and many are already giving their citizens their third or even fourth dose of the vaccine. Meanwhile, poorer countries are struggling to get their populations even a first dose.

In Ethiopia, only 1.3% of people are fully vaccinated against Covid. In Nigeria it is 2.1% according to Our World in Data. By comparison, 62% of Americans in the US are fully vaccinated. In the United Arab Emirates and Portugal, that number is around 90%.

“There are big worries about existential crises – that’s actually number two on this list, so big worries about jobs and what’s going on in the labor market,” said Saadia Zahidi, Executive Director of the World Economic Forum, about the result of the Global Risk Report.

Speaking to CNBC’s Julianna Tatelbaum, she added, “There is this concern about mental crisis and it is eroding social cohesion. For example, there are 53 million new cases of depression, particularly due to Covid. “

Dark prospects

In the report, nearly 1,000 global experts and leaders from academia, business, civil society, government and other organizations said that societal risks “have deteriorated the most since the pandemic began.”

These specific risks included social cohesion and deterioration in mental health.

In addition, only 16% of respondents said they were positive and optimistic about the outlook for the world. In addition, only 11% said they believe the global recovery will accelerate.

The International Monetary Fund already estimated a global growth rate of 5.9% for 2021 and 4.9% for 2022. These projections were made before concerns about a new variant of Covid-19 known as Omicron arose.

Since then, the IMF has admitted that these numbers could be revised downwards because of new restrictions. However, the institution has stated that vaccinations will remain crucial to boost economic performance around the world.

“We screamed from the top of a mountain that [the] Pandemic is the greatest risk to the global economy. And we worked very hard to vaccinate the world. Progress is being made, not enough, “IMF executive director Kristalina Georgieva told CNBC in December.

Sew Repair Predicts “On a regular basis” Model and Purchasing Tendencies for 2022 in Inaugural Model Forecast Report

Reveals the pandemic’s impact on developing wardrobes when people conduct a closet clearance

– Two-thirds of Americans – and nearly 80% of millennials – say they intend to replace about a third of their wardrobe¹

– Almost a third of people would rather accept a 10% pay cut than dress for work every day, ¹ contributes to the rise of the new categories of business comfort and versatile athleisure

– Bold colors and patterns on the rise: Stitch Fix predicts Vibrant Magenta as the color of the year, with mint, mustard and purple also popular with women, while men turn to dusty lavender, dark green and coral. Color blocks, squares, and graphics are some of the most popular patterns

– Jeans are back – which is reflected in an increase in customer inquiries and sales from Stitch Fix. People are turning to more casual fits, with wide-legged sales up 70% year-over-year, while trends to “slim” are declining

– People are excited to get dressed up. 44% plan to replace their go-out clothing – 61% of Generation Z1 – as demand for special occasion clothing and high heels increases at Stitch Fix

– The vast majority (81%) of people would like a better way to find clothes that fit them and their lifestyle¹, suggesting that they need a more personalized shopping experience when they remodel their closets

SAN FRANCISCO, Dec 15, 2021 / PRNewswire / – Stitch Fix (NASDAQ: SFIX), the world’s leading personalized online shopping experience, today released its first Style Forecast highlighting key trends for 2022, including Business Comfort as the new workwear category, Growth in versatile athleisure styles, bold colors and patterns and the resurgence of categories such as jeans, heels and dresses. The report also highlights the frustrations people experience with traditional online shopping, such as:

The comprehensive Style Forecast integrates Stitch Fix sales and purchasing insights from 4.2 million customers and thousands of Stitch Fix stylists, combined with consumer surveys and industry data to give solid insight into real life trends – not just on the fashion catwalks . Stitch Fix has billions of style data points, gathered by advanced algorithms and data science teams, from detailed style feedback that customers choose to leave, providing a continuous impetus on what people buy how often and why would.

The story goes on

“From the very beginning, Stitch Fix has brought together advanced data science and a human touch to transform the way people find the clothes that help them look and feel good. From this data, we also gain insight into broader style trends in the marketplace and what motivates those trends – which has been particularly important in the past two years in order to steer changing consumer preferences at an uncertain time, “said Elizabeth Spaulding, CEO, Stichfix. “We hope the Style Forecast offers a fashion perspective beyond the runway trends to help people and our brand partners better understand what’s trending in everyday life as we head into the New Year and adopt a ‘new normal’ together. “

Below are notable results from the Stitch Fix Style Forecast 2022. To read the full report, visit StitchFix.com/StyleForecast.

The COVID closet clearance:

  • Two-thirds of consumers (67%) plan to replace a third of their wardrobe, 33% plan to replace at least half – and nearly 4 in 5 millennials (79%) are likely to refresh their wardrobe

  • Style preferences have changed: 58% of Stitch Fix Women’s customers and 53% of men said their looks changed during the pandemic and they expect those changes to continue in the near future.

Unexpected style influencers:

  • Amanda Gorman is the most unexpected style icon of 2021, as Stitch Fix customer requests for headbands have increased 600% year on year after putting on a statement headband at the inauguration – during Harry Styles is the most stylish celebrity of the year as inquiries mentioning the fashion icon rose 160% from 2020 after its “Love on Tour” shows launched.

  • Meanwhile, Stitch Fix customers are also turning to TikTok influencers for style advice: customer inquiry notes with “TikTok” are up 75% year over year, with some of the hottest looks including Y2K, Cottagecore and Dark Academia.

The color of the year is Vibrant Magenta:

  • Runner-up is purple, mint, and mustard for women – and dusty lavender, dark green, and coral for men.

  • More than a third (36%) of consumers say they will look forward to bright, saturated colors in 2022. Patterns – like color blocks, squares, and graphics – are also on the rise, with 25% of consumers planning to wear them more often. 1

Business comfort (not casual) is the future of workwear:

  • Almost a third (31%) of consumers say they would rather accept a 10% cut in their wages than dressing up for work every day.1 Almost 4 in 5 Americans (77%) have at least some business attire sworn off forever, 1 Almost half (45%) of the people wanted to do without business suits and a third (31%) wanted to do without suit pants. Over half (51%) of boomers say they will never wear a business suit again.

  • A new category that Stitch Fix called “Business Comfort” has emerged, proving that you can have style and comfort that are more sophisticated than the earlier “Casual” classification. This can be seen in oversized stretch blazers, elastic trousers, sweater dresses and new “Knoven” tops (knitwear + woven material).

Denim & dresses return to the daily wardrobe:

  • Jeans sales at Stitch Fix were up 30% year over year, and women’s wide leg sales were up 70%, while the skinny jeans growth rate declined over the same period after “toasting” on TikTok and a fashion trend over the winter “were heading towards style and comfort.

  • Everyday dresses are thriving too, and Stitch Fix has increased inventory by 40% year-over-year to meet demand. Top styles include maxi dresses, which have seen sales grow 60% year over year; Dresses made from natural fabrics such as linen, poplin, and gauze; and bright, upbeat colors and prints.

All-purpose athleisure & performance-oriented active:

  • Athleisure remains the fastest growing category of Stitch Fix, while performance-based active sales also rise (women 300% +, men 100% + YoY) as people discover new sports like tennis, golf, and hiking. Trendy styles in this category are skorts and skirts, bike shorts, hiking shorts and performance polos.

Increasingly on the move:

  • While workwear is all about comfort, more than half (55%) of consumers said they like getting dressed for going out, with 44% actively planning to replace their dressing gowns – 61% of Generation Z. 1

  • To support this, Stitch Fix’s sales in the special occasion category rose 50% year over year, suggesting that people are actually going out again. And fancy shoes grow faster – both boot and high heel sales rose about 70% year over year, while high boot sales rose 150% over the same period.

Offer a more personalized shopping experience

The vast majority (81%) of consumers say they want a better way to find clothes that fit them and their lifestyle. While eager to refresh their wardrobes, they still have huge frustrations with the typical online shopping experience – such as not knowing the fit before buying and scrolling for hours to find what they are looking for want. In the meantime, customer inquiries for sustainable and organic materials have increased by 22% since 2020, which indicates that consumers are placing increasing emphasis on social and ecological values ​​when shopping. The Style Forecast looks at the ability for retailers to offer the things that are most important to people in a shopping experience right now, such as:

Reporting methodology
The Stitch Fix Style Forecast leverages data collected from Stitch Fix’s 4.2 million customers and thousands of seasoned stylists and its merchandising team who review performance and feedback dashboards on a daily basis. Some of these metrics include: sales data; “Like / Love” value, a measure of customer feedback on certain points; “Success Rate” of the number of times an item is held in a fix (the curated selection of items that are delivered to customers); Customer profile data points; and Fix Request Notes, the note clients leave their stylist to indicate what they would like to receive in their next fix. Unless otherwise stated, all statistics on Stitch Fix sales and “Fix” inquiries refer to the calendar year 2021 to date, as of today November 30, 2021. Comparisons to the previous year relate to the 2020 calendar year from January 1, 2020 to November 30, 2020. Also cited is a survey of 1,000 nationally representative consumers aged 18 and over that was carried out by Wakefield Research for Stitch Fix, a survey of 2,000 nationally representative buyers aged 18 and over by OnePoll, market data from Coresight Research, industry trend sources such as WGSN and Trendalytics. All data is sourced from internal Stitch Fix resources unless otherwise noted. All sales data included refer to Stitch Fix sales unless otherwise stated.

About Stitch Fix
Stitch Fix is ​​the world’s leading personalized online shopping experience. Our unique business model combines the human touch of seasoned stylists with the precision of advanced data science. Since our inception in 2011, we’ve served millions of people as a trusted style partner, helping adults and children dress like their best selves every day. The Stitch Fix team is building a transformative and inclusive e-commerce model, an ecosystem of shopping experiences based on convenience and guided discovery that makes it radically easy and enjoyable for customers to discover and buy what they love. For more, visit https://www.stitchfix.com.

CONTACT: media@stitchfix.com

1 survey of 1,000 nationally representative US adults by Wakefield Research for Stitch Fix

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First HealthCare.gov Enrollment Report; Extra Fundamental Well being Plan Cash For MN, NY

With the 2022 open enrollment phase now in full swing, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) have theirs first weekly registration update. The number of enrollments remains high, presumably driven by the further improved subsidies under the American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA). Separately, CMS gave a revised financing methodology for the Basic Health Program (BHP), which will provide Minnesota and New York, the only two states with BHP, an additional $ 850 million.

First weekly open registration report

On November 12, 2021, CMS released its first weekly enrollment snapshot for HealthCare.gov for the open registration period of 2022. A total of 774,000 people in the 33 states using HealthCare.gov have selected a plan. Most of these consumers (640,283 people) renewed their coverage from last year; there were 133,274 new consumers. CMS reports its data weekly – Sunday through Saturday – so this “week one” report covers only six days (November 1st to November 6th).

This appears to be down slightly from the first week of enrollment for the 2021 open enrollment period when the total enrollment was more than 818,000 people. However, the annual reports are not directly comparable for several reasons. Once these differences are factored in, Charles Gaba has Estimates This week, the number of enrollments has increased significantly compared to the previous year.

What are these differences? First, the first week’s snapshot for 2021 included an additional day of enrollment. Second, the 2021 snapshot reflected data from three states– Kentucky, Maine, and New Mexico – all of which moved from HealthCare.gov to their own state marketplace for this year. Enrollment in these states (more than 180,000 people 2021 total) will not be included in the weekly snapshots and could make the total appear lower. Third, this year two states – Missouri and Oklahoma – expanded their Medicaid programs. The individual market generally shrinks after a state expands its Medicaid program as individuals with incomes between 100 percent and 138 percent of the state poverty line migrate from market coverage to the Medicaid program.

Thanks to improved subsidies under the ARPA, CMS continues to promote record-low premiums. This year’s registration cycle builds on registration gains from 1) the 2021 open registration phase, which was the first and only year that HealthCare.gov registration increased under the Trump administration; and 2) the Biden Government’s six-month COVID-19 special enrollment period if, more than 2.8 million people enrolled in insurance coverage nationwide. Together these activities led to record high enrollments of 12.2 million people in market coverage as of August 2021.

A higher enrollment towards the end of the year means a higher enrollment (including automatic re-enrollment) during this year’s open enrollment period. With a wider subscriber base to begin with, the marketplaces are likely to retain more consumers, while attracting new consumers, compared to previous years.

Interest in reporting also remains high. More than 2.7 million people visited HealthCare.gov and the call center volume reached more than 293,500 calls. CuidadoDeSalud.gov had fewer than 100,000 visitors in the first week of the open registration period and there were more than 24,000 calls with Spanish-speaking representatives. In contrast to the reports on the specific registration period, CMS did not publish registration data by gender, race and ethnicity.

The 2022 open registration period runs from November 1, 2021 through January 15, 2022. CMS will post snapshots of the registration every week and expects to release a final report on the open registration (reflecting data from HealthCare.gov and the state) in the spring. based marketplaces).

On November 10, 2021, CMS released Orientation aid on how it would update its methodology for determining federal funding for the BHP to include increased subsidies under the ARPA. All in all, Minnesota is preserved about $ 100 million, more as New York gets about $ 750 million more than expected according to the previous methodology. Federal payments are based on actual enrollment data that has not yet been submitted by the states; CMS notifies states when updated payments have been issued.

The BHP enables states to offer an alternative to market coverage for certain uninsured individuals with incomes between 133 and 200 percent of the federal poverty line. While these individuals are eligible for premium tax credits (PTCs) and co-payment reductions (CSRs) to purchase a marketplace plan, the BHP allows for more affordable coverage and helps minimize switching between Medicaid and private insurance.

To fund the BHP, CMS makes payments to a state equal to 95 percent of the PTCs and CSRs that eligible BHP applicants would have received had they signed up for a qualified health plan through the marketplace. CMS publishes its methodology for these calculations every year. Since the formula for the BHP is based on PTCs and CSRs, the amounts owed to states under the BHP will be higher under the ARPA. The guide explains how the methodology will change for 2020 and 2021 due to the new law.

First, CMS will consider the lower “Applicable Percentage” of ARPA for PTC Eligible Participants. The new applicable percentages range from 0 to 8.5 percent, depending on the household income of the enrolled. The federal government is thus contributing more to the premium costs for eligible enrolled persons, which increases the contribution of the federal states with the BHP.

Second, CMS updated the reconciliation factors for revenue for both 2020 and 2021, albeit for different reasons. For 2020, CMS has adjusted the methodology to reflect the temporary suspension of the pre-PTC voting requirement for the 2020 tax year. While BHP members do not have to reconcile any benefit receipts, the factor for 2020 is set at 101.53 percent.

For 2021, the earnings adjustment factor will be adjusted to reflect the ARPA provision, which will allow those who received or approved unemployment benefits in 2021 to qualify for maximum PTCs and CSRs. Again, this increases the amount of PTC that BHP applicants would have received had they signed up for market coverage, thus increasing the amount that states receive. For 2021 the factor will be 100.61 percent.

Beyond the Methodology: FAQs for States

The guide also includes five questions and answers for states clarifying other ARPA implications for the BHP. For example, BHP members cannot be asked to pay monthly premiums that are higher than the market. This means that Minnesota and New York will need to adjust their BHP awards (if necessary) to match the applicable percentages included in the ARPA.

As a result, states cannot charge monthly bonuses to BHP members whose household income is below 150 percent of the state poverty line. Similar adjustments need to be made for those whose incomes are 150 to 200 percent of the federal poverty line. If a state levied premiums that did not meet this requirement (ie the BHP premiums were too high), the premiums must be reimbursed to low-income students. This applies to the entire calendar year 2021 and includes those who received unemployment benefits in 2021.

States must also retrospectively enroll certain individuals whose income was below 150 percent of the federal poverty line who were eligible but not enrolled for not paying their original premium. According to ARPA, you do not have an initial premium and must therefore be enrolled retrospectively. CMS urges states to ensure that all unpaid claims are covered and reprocessed.

Report: Georgia company wasted cash seized from taxpayers | State Information

ATLANTA (AP) – State inspectors and an investigation found that a Georgia agency illegally withheld millions of dollars in seized funds and spent money on Fitbits, exercise equipment, and other items.

A department of the Treasury also spent money on engraved firearms and stress balls in the form of beer mugs. The Atlanta Journal Constitution reported.

Tuesday’s Bureau of Inspector General’s report confirmed last year’s coverage by the newspaper and WSB-TV detailing how the money seized from tax investigations was spent by the Treasury Department’s Special Investigations Office.

The spending by the Treasury Department’s investigative department was “clearly wasteful” and “gave the appearance of extravagance,” the report said.

The department has since changed its policy and returned money to the state treasury where it should have gone, the newspaper reported.

Finance Commissioner Robyn Crittenden, who took over the department in July, promised further reforms.

“The department is actively moving forward to ensure that the results highlighted in this report are addressed,” Crittenden said Tuesday.

“We are focused on the Treasury Department’s mission to promote public trust and compliance while providing excellent customer service,” added Crittenden. “We are committed to doing what is right consistently and serving Georgia taxpayers with integrity and accountability.”

The Inspector General’s investigation began after receiving complaints from an attorney representing reality show personalities Todd and Julie Chrisley, whose 2014 TV show “Chrisley Knows Best” made its debut. Her attorney Chris Anulewicz had filed a complaint against the Office of Special Investigations last year.

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed in any way without permission.

City Meyer’s ‘unhinged’ teaching type inflicting inner bother for Jaguars, report says

In Jacksonville, things are already jacked up.

Urban Meyers Jaguars’ tenure got off to a bumpy start, according to Jason La Canfora of CBS Sports, as coaches and players seem to disprove the head coach’s scratchy behavior in preseason, training and meetings during the first year.

La Canfora reports that Meyer’s temper allowed “red flags” early on as head coach, with some questioning his ability to last a season given his summer squabble with the team.

MORE: Why Jaguars’ Urban Meyer Experiment is already the subject of NFL jokes

“There is sometimes a gap between those on the staff with extensive professional experience and those who lack it, and morale has suffered as the outbreaks have continued,” says La Canfora. “His fiery remarks to players and coaches after the games have struck many as bizarre.”

La Canfora reported, citing sources, that Meyer had threatened the job security of his employees after the losses in the previous season and “downgraded coaches”. Meyer struggled to figure out the timing of the installation and other NFL planning elements, causing delays and further difficulties for the coaching team.

Jacksonville members also resent Meyer’s seemingly control freak demeanor, with Meyer taking over exercise drills if not done to his exact specifications and expectations. There are also questions about Meyer’s handling of NFL staff with the team, according to La Canfora.

“He’s already showing everyone over his shoulder,” a source told CBS. “He gets unhinged far too easily and doesn’t know how to deal with losing, even preseason. He loses it and wants to do the exercises himself. It’s not good.”

MORE: It’s not the first time we’ve heard of Urban Meyer’s problems with players

As a longtime and incredibly successful college head coach, Meyer is making his foray into the NFL sphere this year, his first as Jacksonville head coach. With the Jaguars’ hiring of Meyer and the election of child prodigy Trevor Lawrence as No. 1 overall, they signaled a new era in Jacksonville football.

Unfortunately, it doesn’t seem to have got off to a good start for everyone involved.

Report: Most Federal Election Safety Cash Stays Unspent

Congress allocated hundreds of millions of dollars to shore up the country’s electoral system against cyberattacks and other threats, but about two-thirds of the money went unspent just weeks before last year’s presidential election.

A recent federal report said the states, the District of Columbia, and the U.S. Territories had spent just over $ 255 million of $ 805 million on election security grants as of September 30th last year, the latest numbers available.

States have been given leeway in how and when to spend their shares as electoral concerns and potential weaknesses in electoral systems vary widely. Several election officials cited two main reasons for the slow pace of spending: More than half of the money was not allocated until the 2020 elections were less than a year away, leaving election officials and state lawmakers little time to make key spending decisions. And the coronavirus pandemic turned last year’s election planning on its head, forcing officials to focus on election security and seek earlier voting and postal voting.

“Security was still on everyone’s lips, but it was being pushed into the background to make sure the elections go without a total collapse,” said Don Palmer, chairman of the US Electoral Commission, which published the report.

A State-by-state snapshot The commission, released last month, shows that the state’s 50 states plus the District of Columbia and five territories at the end of the federal fiscal year on September 30, when the early voting was already in the presidential election, accounted for around 31% of the funding for election security. The grant money has come in two servings since 2018 under the Help America Vote Act.

choice_security_funds_state_expenditures.png

US Electoral Aid Commission

A breakdown of electoral security funds by state in the Election Assistance Commission report shows Colorado spent $ 1 million of the $ 13.5 million in federal funds it received through September 30, 2020.

Louisiana, one of the last states to deploy aging paper-free voting machines nationwide, did not spend any of its $ 12.5 million in electoral security grants prior to the 2020 presidential election. Its initial efforts to replace thousands of voting machines were halted amid controversy over the selection process.

In July, the Democratic governor of Louisiana and his Republican lawmakers agreed on a process a verifiable paper trail required for any electoral system chosen by the GOP foreign minister.

In 2017, the federal government informed election officials in 21 states that hackers targeted their systems ahead of the 2016 presidential election. The spread of the attempts caused concern among some electoral officials and lawmakers at the time, even though the hackers failed to break into electoral systems or manipulate voter data or results.

North Dakota – one of the target states – did not spend any of the $ 6 million it received in electoral security grants as of September 30. The state told the Election Assistance Commission in its own financial report that it did not purchase any election equipment and did not conduct any security training during the year. Instead, other funding sources with expiration dates were prioritized. North Dakota originally applied for polling bail to purchase a nationwide digital scan voting system and electronic polling books for every polling location in the state.

Former Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report says that in June 2016, Russian activists successfully compromised the Illinois State Board of Elections computer network and gained access to a voter registration database containing the information of millions of people. By September 30, however, Illinois officials had spent less than 16% of the $ 28.1 million in bail money for the federal election. EAC Commissioner Benjamin Hovland told lawmakers that Illinois spending seemed low as the state spent most of its money on a multi-year project called the Cyber ​​Navigator Program, which aims to defend, detect, and stay away from cyber attacks to recover them.

Pennsylvania, a presidential battlefield that was also one of the target states in 2016, spent nearly 90% of its $ 28.6 million prior to the 2020 elections mainly on replacing voting machines. Other politically important states that were targeted – Arizona, Florida, and Wisconsin – spent about half of their money.

Hovland said the electoral grant money had no expiration date and said it was “the first real money” to come into the states for elections in a long time, and people had no confidence that there would be additional federal funding .

A review of state progress reports by Commission officials found that a “joint activity” among states was to spend the money on examining the November presidential election. The report found that Colorado, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, and many other states are planning some form of audit.

According to the agency’s 2020 report, state spending on federal grants fell into three main categories: nearly 39% went to cybersecurity upgrades; approx. 25% were invested in new voting machines; and 11% updated voter registration databases.

During the 2020 general election, only 32 constituencies across the country relied on paperless voting machines. Nine states – Arkansas, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, New Jersey, Tennessee, and Texas – used electronic voting machines that had no verifiable paper trail in at least one of their territories.

Five states that had used voting machines without paper backup in 2018 had stopped using them by the 2020 general election. These were Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Pennsylvania, and South Carolina.

The lack of consistent federal money for election security is likely a reason why many electoral officials in the state don’t spend their federal grants, said Lawrence Norden, director of electoral reform at the Brennan Center for Justice.

Former Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, who served as vice chairman of former President Donald Trump’s now-defunct electoral fraud commission, was the top electoral officer in the state when Kansas received the first infusion, ultimately worth $ 9.3 million. Nothing of this money was spent at the time.

Kobach said that when the federal money arrived, lawmakers did not meet to provide the necessary matching funds. Under his successor, Scott Schwab, Kansas spent only $ 19,200 on testing and training prior to the 2020 election to ensure electoral staff were using email “safely and securely”. State officials say they have since spent more than $ 3.4 million of grant funding, in part to improve the security of the Kansas statewide voter registration system and to complement cybersecurity efforts.

Some states have chosen to keep the federal money because the technology that now appears to be effective in securing elections could be out of date in 10 years, said Danielle Root, an electoral security expert with the Center for American Progress.

“Many states view the elections as a marathon rather than a race, and many states want to reserve some of that funding to update their systems as new threats and technological advances emerge,” she said.

Copyright 2021 Associated Press. All rights reserved.

Vaccine inequality might value the worldwide financial system trillions: Report

A woman reacts when she is vaccinated against Covid-19 with a dose of the Covishield vaccine on August 12, 2021 at a vaccination center in Mumbai.

PUNIT PARANJPE | AFP | Getty Images

The global economy will lose trillions of GDP due to late vaccination deadlines, with developing countries bearing the most losses due to uneven introduction, the Economist Intelligence Unit said in a report.

Countries that fail to vaccinate 60% of their populations by mid-2022 will lose $ 2.3 trillion between 2022 and 2025, the EIU predicted.

“The emerging economies will shoulder about two-thirds of these losses, which will further delay their economic convergence with the more developed countries,” wrote Agathe Demarais, EIU’s global forecasting director.

There is little chance that the vaccine access gap will ever be bridged.

Agathe Demarais

Global Forecasting Director for the Economist Intelligence Unit

Asia will be “by far the hardest hit continent” in absolute terms, with losses of $ 1.7 trillion, or 1.3% of the region’s forecast GDP. Countries in sub-Saharan Africa will lose around 3% of their forecast GDP, the highest percentage, according to the report.

“These estimates are striking, but they only partially capture missed economic opportunities, especially in the long run,” the EIU said, noting that the impact of the pandemic on education was not included in this forecast. Richer countries turned to distance learning during the lockdown, but many in developing countries did not have that option.

More than 213 million people have contracted Covid-19 and at least 4.4 million have died during the pandemic, data compiled by Johns Hopkins University showed.

Rich-poor divide

Wealthy nations are moving far in their Covid vaccination rates, moving towards a booster and reopening their economies, while poorer countries are drastically lagging behind in the race for vaccination.

As of August 23, around 5 billion doses of the vaccine had been given worldwide, but according to Our World in Data, the figure was only 15.02 million of those doses in low-income countries.

“The vaccination campaigns are advancing at an icy pace in low-income economies,” says the EIU report.

The report said that vaccine injustice was due to global shortages of manufacturing capacity and vaccine raw materials, logistical difficulties in transporting and storing vaccines, and hesitation due to suspicion of vaccines.

Many developing countries cannot afford vaccines for their residents either, and hope for donations from richer countries, but global initiatives have not been entirely successful in providing vaccines to those in need.

“There’s little chance the vaccine access gap will ever be bridged,” EIU’s Demarais said in a statement. COVAX, the WHO-sponsored initiative to ship vaccines to emerging countries, has not lived up to (modest) expectations. “

“Despite flattering press releases and generous promises, donations from rich countries have only covered a fraction of the need – and often they are not even delivered,” she wrote.

Covax aimed to ship around 2 billion doses of vaccine this year but has only shipped 217 million doses to date. according to the UNICEF tracker.

Some of the deliveries went to developed countries such as Great Britain, Canada, Australia and New Zealand, reported the Associated Press.

Effects of Inequality

Poorer countries are likely to recover from the pandemic more slowly, especially if restrictions have to be reintroduced due to lower vaccination rates, the EIU said.

Tourists could also avoid countries with large unvaccinated populations for safety reasons, while political resentment is likely to increase, the report said. Residents may be unhappy that their local governments cannot provide vaccines and see states richer than hoarders of the shots.

“Social unrest is very likely in the months and years to come,” wrote Demarais.

Additionally, the virus situation continues to evolve, with herd immunity likely out of reach due to the highly transmissible Delta variant and vaccination being sought “more modestly” to reduce severe cases, hospitalizations and deaths, the report said.

Political leaders are busy responding to short-term emergencies such as the rapid rise in infection rates, but now need to develop a longer-term strategy, Demarais wrote.

“Here, too, the rich-poor contrast will be strong: vaccinated, richer states have a choice, unvaccinated, poorer ones don’t,” she said.

Report: Utah Board Misused Public Cash on Fossil Gas Tasks, Didn’t Fund Rural Neighborhood Wants

SALT LAKE CITY – The Utah Clean Infrastructure Coalition publishes a report Today it is revealed that the Utah Permanent Community Impact Fund board has allocated more than $ 109 million in public funds to projects to promote or expand fossil fuel extraction in violation of federal mineral leasing law.

The report also documents that needed infrastructure projects in rural communities are not being funded while Utah leaders are using federal leases and royalties to help the fossil fuel industry, including a planned oil railroad and oil refinery.

“Utahns are deeply damaged by drought, forest fires, smoke and extreme weather exacerbated by fossil fuels,” said Deeda Seed of the Center for Biodiversity. “It is outrageous that Utah leaders are using public money to subsidize the fossil fuel industry that is causing this climate crisis. That has to end now. We need to invest in sustainable, resilient infrastructure for all communities in Utah. “

Oil, gas, and coal companies pay the federal government the right to develop federally owned minerals on public land and pay royalties for any minerals they mine. Congress intended to use this money to help rural communities facing rapid growth and infrastructure problems due to fossil fuel extraction.

Utah is responsible for distributing the money to the affected communities. However, today’s report noted that much of that administered by the governor-appointed Permanent Community Impact Fund Board has been used to enable fossil fuel extraction. Meanwhile, millions of dollars in community projects identified by rural communities have not been funded, including water and sanitation services, recreation centers, road improvements, and public safety equipment.

“I have stayed out of politics since I left office, but I cannot remain silent when I witness the misconduct of the elected and appointed people who represent the people of Utah,” said the former Salt Lake City mayor and State MP Jackie Biskupski at a press conference on the steps of the State Capitol. “I respectfully urge the Department of the Interior and the Bureau of Land Management to conduct a thorough investigation of state mineral lease spending in the state of Utah since 2009 and to take the necessary steps to ensure that local Utah communities receive these funds for their community- and infrastructure projects. “

Today’s report reinforces the findings of a 2020 report from Utah’s Office of the Legislative Auditor General, who raised serious concerns about the Community Impact Board, including the board’s failure to properly fund economic development projects. Despite the findings and recommendations of the audit, the board of directors continued to abuse public funds.

“We call on the legislature and the Utah Community Impact Board to adopt the recommendations set out in the report, including a motion to ban the use of CIB public funds on projects designed to promote or facilitate the extraction of fossil fuels, in accordance with federal law. “Said Carly Ferro, executive director of the Sierra Club’s Utah Chapter. “The Sierra Club will continue to hold regulators and industry accountable for ensuring that polluters are given priority over people. We must continue to invest in communities, people and the environment, and only together can we achieve what is possible. “

“The misuse of money by the Community Impact Fund Board, which is legally intended to help communities affected by the dirty fossil fuel industry, is reprehensible and illegal,” said Jonny Vasic, executive director of Utah Physicians for a Healthy Environment. “These funds should be used to help local communities deal with the impact of the mining industry, not to duplicate a polluting industry that affects people’s health and contributes to climate change.”

Utah Clean Infrastructure partners include the Center for Biological Diversity, Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance, Sierra Club, Rural Utah Project, Utah Physicians for a Health Environment, Utah Tar Sands Resistance, Living Rivers, Utah Environmental Caucus, No Coal In Oakland, No Coal In Richmond and the Healthy Environment Alliance of Utah (HEAL Utah).

Edin Dzeko Has Already Proven That He Fits Inter’s Model Beneath Simone Inzaghi, Italian Media Report

The new Inter striker has already proven to fans and management that he fits in well with Inter’s philosophy and style, according to a report in Italian media today.

As reported by The Gazzetta dello Sport, the Bosnian striker immediately showed that he will be the center of Inter’s attacking game on the pitch as faster players run away from him.

This is what happened on Saturday night with Inter’s first goal in a 3-0 win over Dynamo Kiev. The ball was played with his back to the goal in Edin Dzeko and he instinctively put it to Nicolo Barella, who then scored.

This is a resemblance to the game played by Romelu Lukaku, who is wonderful at stopping the game and drawing others into battle.

Therefore, Edin Dzeko is a logical short-term solution for the sale of Romelu Lukaku to Chelsea.

Lifeless bushes and lacking cash — State Journal report from 125 years in the past | Column



Angular screw station

The Angle Worm Station at Barnes Boat Dock on Lake Monona in Madison was the site of a bruise and a lost wallet in 1896. The station got its name from its owner and operator Captain Frank Barneswho gave a speech on July 4th every year on how civilization depends on earthworms, according to the Wisconsin Historical Society.


WISCONSIN HISTORICAL SOCIETY

This summary of the State Journal’s local news ran on August 1, 1896:

Hundreds of dead trees can be seen along Lake Mendota Drive. Last summer’s drought killed them.

Williamson Street is delighted that William Mueller opened a world-class bakery down there.

A man painting telegraph poles along Main Street’s business district attracts the attention of dozens of people with nothing else to do.

The joinery at the intersection of South Hamilton and Fairchild Streets, which had long been in the hands of the late SL Chase, is now run by Henry Skidmore.

Dr. CA Harper bought the old Durrie homestead on North Carroll Street from EJ Foster for $ 6,300; The lot is 66 x 132 feet and is considered a bargain.

Yesterday afternoon, after James Gallagher suffered bruises from buckling part of the platform at Angle Worm Station, he lost a wallet between $ 4 and $ 5.

The next thing for entertainment lovers will be a lumberjack picnic in Cross Plains on Sunday. Madison will provide the speaker in the person of Mr EW De Bower.

North Henry Street, from Mifflin to State, is to be greatly expanded and the residential buildings on it will be supplied with a sewage system. The macadamization of West Dayton Street from Henry to Broom will begin at an early stage.