Distant tellers, restaurant-style pagers: Department design within the COVID period | Credit score Union Journal

At Landmark Credit Union in Brookfield, Wisconsin, waiting for a cashier feels like waiting for a table in a restaurant.

In order to enable social distancing in the three new branches that the credit union built this year with assets of $ 5.8 billion, Landmark is trying to get rid of the queues at the counter. Instead, the same pagers are issued that many chain restaurants use to warn diners when a table is ready. Members can also schedule an appointment online where they can see bankers’ availability for key services such as loan closings and account openings.

“This allows members to schedule a time that best fits their schedule and eliminates the waiting time typically associated with walk-in appointments. We are also expanding our self-service capabilities in our branches, ”said Chief Experience Officer Brian Melter.

Pinnacle Credit Union in Atlanta takes a different approach to social distancing. In the next branch, she expects many of her cashiers to be able to work from home.

The new branch will have a mix of distributed ATMs and interactive ATMs that will be operated remotely. Depending on the machine type, customers could still sign and show their IDs to authorize transactions. The $ 89 million credit union expects cashiers to remotely perform at least 95% of normal transactions.

“We bet at least half a human resources department will be needed in the future because the personal touch is still important,” said Matt Selke, CEO of the $ 89 million credit union.

It’s a balancing act, said Selke. While it can allow almost all cashiers to work remotely, the credit union’s customers still want personal access to bank employees.

“We will have more traditional checkout lines than we previously thought – albeit more widely – with the option of ITMs in a different section of the store,” said Selke.

These pagers enable Landmark Credit Union members to know when it is their turn to meet a cashier without queuing.

Even as vaccination rates go up and people push back to concerts and sporting events, there is still a push to Wear masks and distance yourself socially to protect the unvaccinated as well as to protect against breakthrough cases and new coronavirus variants. These concerns take center stage when banks and credit unions consider new branch structures.

Those building new branches have the opportunity to experiment with floor plans that offer more space between checkout lines or self-service options.

One factor that helps create social distance is the increasing acceptance of drive-through or digital banking. This allows banks and credit unions to provide more personal space without a larger floor plan.

“Although newly built stores are smaller, new concepts are more open and provide more space within the facility to allow social distancing, as many institutions want to maintain at least minimal counter presence,” said Glenn Grau, senior vice president of sales for the Pittsburgh facility resident industry advisor PWCampbell.

Another example of this branch design philosophy is Credit Union 1, with $ 1.4 billion in assets, which recently opened a new branch in Anchorage, where the Alaskan credit union is headquartered.

This facility, which opened on November 1st, has seen strong adoption of interactive ATMs and has been praised for the lack of traditional ATMs. Members can access individual help in the branch via employees who can be reached by video.

“We thought of the future throughout the process and then the current events of COVID happened and we were already on the move to give Alaskans a better way to invest in this environment. The financial center and the state of the world could not have been more symbiotic, ”said Rachel Langtry, chief operating officer of the credit union.

The $ 305 million asset Greater Community Bank in Rome, Georgia, had started a “major expansion renovation” in a market prior to COVID and eventually decided to continue that plan for a larger physical presence, said President and CEO David Lance.

The bank has created space for one-on-one meetings, zoom rooms and more open space to provide a comfortable and safe environment for both employees and customers, he said.

The dynamism of these newer branch concepts, however, comes up against another trend to reduce the number of branches overall. Younger consumers are more comfortable with the technology and less likely to have to visit their bank or credit union in person – but they still want to be able to go to a branch when needed.

“There is an ongoing discussion about how many and what types of stores are working, but it looks like there will be fewer,” said Peter Duffy, general manager at Piper Sandler. “Technology is the bank of millennials. You want to see a branch nearby, but don’t use it. “

Absolutely distant college yr as a result of Covid ‘doable’ with out mitigation ways, says Dr. Gottlieb

DR. Scott Gottlieb warned Covid-19 could again force schools to remain completely remote amid concerns potential outbreaks in the fall in the classrooms.

“Unfortunately, it’s possible, especially if you go into this school year without the kind of mitigation we introduced last year,” Gottlieb, the former FDA chief in the Trump administration, told CNBCs “The News with Shepard Smith”

“We cannot expect fewer measures to be taken to contain infection in schools and the same outcome to keep infection at bay.”

The American Academy of Pediatrics found that children 15% of all new Covid cases last week. Gottlieb recommended Covid containment tools for schools such as masking, placing children in defined social groups, routine tests, and retrofitting air filter systems.

Gottlieb pointed out to host Shepard Smith that schools shouldn’t “take their foot off the break” if the goal is to stay open.

“This is a much more contagious variety, it could be a lot harder to control in school so the goal should be to keep schools open and try to keep these measures going until we see how it goes,” said Gottlieb.

Disclosure: Scott Gottlieb is a CNBC employee and a member of the board of directors of Pfizer, genetic testing startup Tempus, health technology company Aetion Inc., and biotechnology company Illumina. He is also co-chair of the Healthy Sail Panel of Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings and Royal Caribbean.

International Media and Leisure (M&E) Video Transcoding Market Report 2021: COVID-19 Pandemic has Compelled a Shift to Cloud-based Video Workflows for Distant Manufacturing and Distribution

DUBLIN, 06/11/2021 – (BUSINESS WIRE)–The “The COVID-19 pandemic has forced a switch to cloud-based video workflows for remote production and distribution” Report was added to ResearchAndMarkets.com to offer.

This study analyzes the global media and entertainment (M&E) video transcoding market (the base year is 2020).

Video transcoders are used to convert content from a single input source to a variety of output formats, definitions, resolutions, and file or live formats. This enables video to be delivered to various networked and portable devices.

Video transcoding also refers to the process of converting uncompressed or compressed content to another compressed format or significantly reusing the content, typically in the context of a digital media workflow. M&E video transcoders are sold through direct sales as well as value-added resellers and system integrators.

For the purposes of this study, the editor has identified two main segments of video transcoding – production and multiscreen / video on demand (VoD). Video transcoding customers assigned to the production segment use video transcoding in post production and archiving applications, and the main customers are post production studios.

The Multiscreen / VoD segment comprises pay-TV operators, over-the-top (OTT) service providers, broadcasters and pure internet video services. Typically, multiscreen / VoD transcoding involves creating optimized video streams for unicast or multicast distribution of video to primary monitors, attached computers, devices, and second / third monitors. Video transcoding solutions can be found in hardware, software, and software-as-a-service (SaaS) form factors.

As the digital media ecosystem evolves to incorporate more content and video processing technologies across a wide variety of devices, many vendors are upgrading their video transcoding solutions from hardware to software and SaaS to stay agile and cost-effective, although some older hardware solutions persist consistently on top of that Market. The market saw sales decline due to the COVID-19 pandemic and the budgetary problems most content providers were facing due to global security measures such as social distancing and bans.

The story goes on

However, it is expected to recover over the next 2 years as video transcoding will remain a business critical technology in the M&E space. The fate of the marketplace is tied to improvements in workflow and deployment as an increasing number of formats and devices take shape in this mature domain. Due to mergers and acquisitions, the market has seen fierce competition and the entry and exit of providers.

The study also identifies 3 growth opportunities and discusses the trends and sales related to the Multiscreen / VoD and the product segments and breaks down the sales distribution by form factor.

Key topics covered:

1. Strategic imperatives

  • Why is it always harder to grow?

  • The strategic imperative

  • The Impact of Three Top Strategic Imperatives on the M&E Video Transcoding Market

  • Growth opportunities drive the growth pipeline engine

2. Growth Opportunity Analysis, M&E Video Transcoding Market

  • Scope of analysis

  • Market segmentation

  • Main competitors

  • Important growth metrics

  • Distribution channels

  • Growth accelerator

  • Growth restraints

  • Forecast assumptions

  • Sales forecast

  • Price trend analysis

  • Percentage sales by form factor

  • Percentage sales according to workflow

  • Percentage revenue by form factor and workflow analysis

  • Competitive environment

  • Market share of the top participants

  • Market share analysis

3. Growth Opportunity Analysis, Production Video Transcoding Segment

  • Important growth metrics

  • Sales forecast

  • Sales forecast by region

  • Analysis of the sales forecast

  • Market share of the top participants

4. Analysis of growth opportunities, Multiscreen / VoD Transcoding segment

  • Important growth metrics

  • Sales forecast

  • Sales forecast by region

  • Analysis of the sales forecast

  • Market share of the top participants

5. Growth Opportunity Universe, M&E Video Transcoding Market

  • Growth Opportunity 1 – High-Density Transcoding for Streaming Live Events, 2020

  • Growth Opportunity 2 – Powerful Transcoding for AR / VR / 360 Video, 2020

  • Growth Opportunity 3 – Cloud-Based Video Workflows for Remote Production, 2020

For more information on this report, see https://www.researchandmarkets.com/r/x6vdpg

View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20210611005379/en/

contacts

ResearchAndMarkets.com
Laura Wood, Senior Press Manager
press@researchandmarkets.com

For EST office hours, call 1-917-300-0470
For US / CAN toll free call 1-800-526-8630
For GMT office hours, call + 353-1-416-8900. at

Distant studying and federal cash

Editor’s Note: In the May 4th election, registered voters residing in the Sidney City Schools District will be asked to approve a 0.75% income tax levy. Every week for the weeks leading up to the election, the Sidney Daily News will publish a school district-provided tax question about the tax.

SIDNEY – Doesn’t distance learning save money? And what about the federal money that schools received from the Coronavirus Law on Aid, Aid and Economic Security (CARES)?

Distance learning has not saved the district any money. In some ways, district costs have increased to meet students’ distance learning needs.

• Although approximately 14% of K-12 students study remotely, the district staffing levels remain the same.

• The bus routes have remained completely intact despite some of the students studying from a distance.

• The teachers in grades 5 through 12 teach both in person and online, sometimes at the same time.

• Yje District has secured grants to offset technology purchases and support face-to-face and distance learning.

At Sidney City Schools, costs have also increased due to COVID-19, including personal protective equipment (PPE), increased cleaning and disinfection, and catering services.

Sidney City Schools received federal funding of $ 652,607 under the CARES Act. While this money has helped offset the increased costs noted above, the CARES Act funds may only be used for COVID-related expenses. It cannot be used to fill salaries / benefits or utilities. The money from the CARES law does not make up for the cuts or cuts in the state budget that are necessary to stabilize our budget.

On Tuesday, May 4, 2021, Sidney City Schools will call on voters to approve a 0.75% income tax levy to generate $ 3.3 million per year in support of the district’s activities.

For more information about the Sidney City Schools drop-off, visit www.sidneyschoolslevy.org.

This is part of a series of weekly questions and answers. Please check back every week to find out more.