New and used automobile costs hold climbing. Don’t count on aid quickly

When it comes to car purchases these days, sticker price can be a sticker shock.

The prices for new and used cars continue to rise in view of the strong demand and the shortage of stocks. While the slowdown in production has improved slightly, there will be no return to normal for car buyers anytime soon.

“The typical dealer experience that consumers are familiar with – dealer lots with rows of cars, negotiating the price and lots of incentives – is unlikely to return this year as it is 4.5. are [million] 5 million consumers waiting on the sidelines for cars, “said Tyson Jominy, head of data and analytics at JD Power.

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“This backlog will keep inventory levels low and prices high for most of 2022,” Jominy said.

An ongoing global shortage of microchips – key components needed to power today’s cars – that began in 2020 continues to slow manufacturers’ production of new vehicles, which has resulted in demand exceeding supply.

“It’s a little better in that there is no more inventory loss – it doesn’t get worse,” said Ivan Drury, Edmunds.com senior manager of Insights. “But we’ll talk to each other for many months until it looks more normal.”

The average transaction price for a new car is now higher than the manufacturer’s suggested retail price, or MSRP: $ 45,872 versus $ 45,209, according to the latest data from Edmunds.

An estimated 89% of buyers pay more than or within 5% of the sticker price, Jominy said.

One reason for the record transaction prices is that automakers have cut their discounts because they generally don’t have to offer big incentives to sell cars.

In other words, new cars don’t stay long in a dealer parking lot: in December, an estimated 57% of cars were sold within 10 days of delivery, according to JD Power. The average time it takes a new car to sell off the lot is a total of 17 days, a record low and less than 49 days a year ago.

Demand has also expanded into the used car market, where buyers are paying an average of $ 29,011, up 27.9% from a year ago, data from Edmunds shows. That ranges from an average of $ 14,124 for a 9-year-old car to $ 30,334 for a 3-year-old vehicle.

One bright spot, Drury said, is that demand for used cars has driven trade-in values ​​well above normal.

“Buy this trade-in,” he said. “Don’t get rid of old assumptions about mileage or depreciation because all that stuff is on the doorstep.”

And while you should be prepared that there is little wiggle room on the price of the car, you may be able to negotiate the value of your trade-in.

In addition, interest rates are generally low at the moment.

“You can still get cheap money,” said Drury, adding that there are still 0% or 0.9% financing offers depending on the make and model you are looking at. Otherwise the average interest rate for a new car loan below 4%, according to Bankrate.

If you are flexible in terms of time when purchasing and cannot find what you are looking for on the dealer lot, it can be worthwhile to order your car.

“Although it can take four to eight weeks for the vehicle to arrive, it will be built to your exact specifications such as features and color,” said Jominy. “And now, some automakers will be incentivizing pre-orders that consumers won’t have when they buy what’s in stock.”

San Antonians say psychological well being, housing, and infrastructure amongst finest methods to spend pandemic aid cash

SAN ANTONIO – As the San Antonio City Council decides how to spend the remaining $ 199.4 million in unallocated money from the American Rescue Plan Act, parishioners have made their wishes known.

In a presentation on Thursday to the council members, the city officials presented the results of the various surveys, town hall meetings and meetings with the Small Business Advocacy Commission from the previous months. Housing, infrastructure and economic development were high on the list of immediate spending priorities for community members, while they said mental health, housing and quality childcare were their preferred long-term investments.

The SBAC listed priorities such as access to capital, such as grants or loans; Capacity building through vocational training and financial literacy; and promoting art and tourism.

The city has been allocated $ 326.9 million in ARPA dollars, half of which it has already received. The other half is expected to be received in May 2022.

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The city is allowed to use the money for a variety of purposes, including: balancing budget constraints; pay for the public health response to the pandemic; Payment of bonuses for important employees; and water, sewer and broadband infrastructure works.

The city has already committed $ 97.5 million to fill budget gaps from lost revenue over three fiscal years. Council too Set aside $ 30 million to help people in arrears with their electricity and water bills.

On Thursday, city officials recommended allocating $ 35 million to the city’s COVID-19 response, $ 35.95 million for “immediate” community needs and $ 128.45 million for “effective investment.”

POSSIBLE BONUS FOR CITY WORKERS

City officials suggested two “premium payment” options for city workers, for the several council members had asked.

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Depending on their annual income, the first plan would pay employees a bonus of up to $ 3,000 if they worked on-site in the 12 months between March 2020 and March 2021.

This plan would cost $ 10 million and cover 5,920 eligible employees.

However, City Manager Erik Walsh had employees come up with a second plan that would cover all employees – 11,760 of them – and pay up to $ 2,000, depending on their hire date and annual earnings. This plan would cost $ 14.3 million.

“But from my point of view, I think we should treat everyone equally from the point of view of employees,” said Walsh.

While not all city employees would meet the ARPA guidelines for premium payment, which are intended for those who had to work in person during the pandemic, city employees could justify this by using the “revenue replacement” category.

Some councilors called for a third option that would still cover all 11,760 employees but offer a relatively higher bonus for the 5,920 who had to come to work.

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City officials noted that none of the other major Texas cities had yet chosen to use ARPA money for bonuses.

NEXT STEPS

The city council has yet to approve the overall framework for the use of the money. This is expected to happen in a February 3rd vote after the city council made adjustments based on Thursday’s discussion.

Thereafter, the council members will assist through various sub-committees in deciding which programs to fund the ARPA money.

Copyright 2021 by KSAT – All rights reserved.

Cleveland looking for to award $2M to financially troubled NEON Well being Providers utilizing pandemic aid cash: Stimulus Watch

CLEVELAND, Ohio – Cleveland City Council could pass bill Monday to allocate $ 2 million from the city’s pandemic funds to a nonprofit agency that is providing its CEO with more than $ 500,000 despite pre-pandemic financial difficulties pays.

Northeast Ohio Neighborhood Health Services (NEON) are seeking funding from the American Rescue Plan to strengthen their health services in some of Cleveland’s poorest minority neighborhoods.

Proponents argue that the money could go far in supporting major health programs. but Tax returns from NEON reveal a precarious financial situation – and a CEO who received a $ 100,000 raise in a year the agency was caring for fewer patients and was in the red.

NEON’s plan to spend the $ 2 million American Rescue Plan Act will use the lion’s share – $ 1.4 million – on several new and existing programs, including mental health services, lead prevention and intervention, food distribution, Education about healthy eating, chronic disease control and health literacy. However, this funding pool also includes items such as “NEON Administration” and “NEON Direct Costs – Transportation”, with no US dollar amounts specified for any program.

Another $ 360,000 would work with LegalWorks, Inc. to fund a detox clinic, and $ 200,000 would be used to repair damage to the NEON Hough Health Center, which caught fire in May.

The Hough Center is temporarily closed, and NEON’s other centers are bringing health services to other areas where Clevelander suffer disproportionately from negative health outcomes, including Miles-Broadway, Norwood, St. Clair-Superior, and the Southeast Side.

NEON is a state-qualified health center and, according to IRS filings, brings in primarily cash from contributions – about $ 13 million in 2019 – and program services like Medicaid reimbursements totaling about $ 11 million in 2019. Funding is received through the administration for health resources and services. This agency said cleveland.com that NEON receives funding until the end of the year and has been approved for a 3-year funding from 01/01/2022 to 12/31/2024. The agency spokesman was not yet able to announce the total amount of the funding at the time of going to press.

According to the Health Resources and Services Administration, NEON Caring for fewer patients each year, down about a third over the past five years – from 31,804 in 2016 to 21,605 in 2020. From 2017 to 2018 – the year that board member granted CEO Willie Austin a $ 100,000 raise – NEON served 2,740 fewer employees.

Although NEON serves fewer Clevelanders, NEON’s tax returns are in deficit in 2014, 2016, 2017, 2018 and 2019 – the last available year when net income was nearly $ 1 million in the red.

In 2020, NEON received more than $ 5 million in pandemic-related funding – a $ 3.6 million forgivable loan from the CARES Paycheck Protection Program and $ 1.6 million in additional Health Center Grants and $ 216,000 in Relief Funds.

Cleveland.com contacted NEON and Austin for this story.

Some of NEON’s financial difficulties are related to a payout of more than $ 1.3 million due to a Unlawful termination lawsuit. In this case, employee James O’Donnell was fired after raising concerns about a financial audit involving the questionable activities of Arthur Fayne, a NEON board member and head of the consulting firm hired to lead the New Eastside Market project, showed that the developer was responsible for the NEON.

In December 2020, Fayne has been charged with embezzling $ 855,000 from the Eastside Market project. The case is pending.

NEON was selected to develop the New Eastside Market in 2015 and rented the property on St. Clair Avenue from the city for $ 1 a year. The city has also deposited over $ 350,000 as well a 75 percent tax reduction for 15 years on improvements to the property, including new plumbing, electrical and roofing. When the project went over budget in 2018, the city approved an additional $ 500,000 grant. Cuyahoga County and the State of Ohio also awarded grants of $ 750,000 each.

New Eastside Market opened in 2019 with a vision to operate a full-service grocery store in what is otherwise considered a “food wasteland,” as well as providing health and wellness services. But NEON has yet to deliver on some of his promises for the location, like opening a health clinic or a demonstration kitchen for nutritious cooking classes.

Alderman Basheer Jones, whose ward includes NEON’s Hough Clinic, was the council’s strongest supporter of raising $ 2 million in stimulus funds to NEON. Jones, who has given up his council seat because of an unsuccessful mayoral candidacy, has made the NEON proposal his final legislative proposal.

Speaking at a committee meeting on November 16, Jones said he saw NEON’s latest funding proposal as a step toward holistic health. Jones said when NEON was founded in 1967 it was one of the few health care providers that the city’s black community felt welcome.

“Well, I’m sure there have been a lot of mistakes along the way,” Jones continued. “Unfortunately we live in a country where some make mistakes and others can’t make mistakes… Why can some organizations as a city make mistakes and then get the resources and still be able to make mistakes? Do business and there are some who are excluded? “

The city council is expected to deliberate on the law at its final session of the year on Monday before a new council and mayor take office in January.

Stimulus Watch is a public service journalism project run by cleveland.com and The Plain Dealer to track federal funding reaching Northeast Ohio through the US rescue plan. Read more undercleveland.com/stimulus-watch.

Library fines cramping your fashion, Callander? Reduction awaits

The Callander Public Library will operate without fines from November 30th in order to provide “equal and accessible service to all,” the library staff said.

The elimination of late fee fines is a “monumental step” in achieving this accessibility, and the library’s CEO, Melissa Sones, urges all residents to return their overdue materials.

That edition of War and Peace that you have owned for a decade and fearful of returning it because of a decade of late fees? Bring it back and return to the library’s good books without damaging your wallet.

“The bottom line is we really want people to return their items,” said Sones, “that’s the main goal.”

The elimination of fees also enables those who stop using the library because of an excessive number of overdue fees.

“For some people, fines are an obstacle to accessing library materials,” explained Sones, “the very idea of ​​imposing fines is enough to prevent them from using the library.”

She found that overdue fines “have a disproportionate impact on children and families who cannot afford them,” and those charges could discourage people from borrowing.

“The library is there for everyone” in the community, emphasized Sones.

“Implementing a good free model is basically the best approach,” said Sones.

Throughout the pandemic, the library has waived past due fees, and staff have noted that the number of unreturned media has “decreased significantly”.

Although the fine will be waived for overdue materials, users will still be charged for replacements for lost and damaged items.

Recognizing the “critical role” of libraries in the community in promoting education and literacy, Sones aims to ensure access for all “regardless of their financial situation”.

“Impunity will increase access to the library for everyone in the community,” she said, noting, “This is a great day in Callander Public Library history.”

As for those customers who may have avoided the stacks due to overdue fees, “we’re so excited to welcome them back to their library,” said Sones.

See how a lot Covid-19 reduction cash well being care suppliers in your state bought

C.ongress set up a massive $ 178 billion fund in 2020 to help mitigate the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on healthcare providers, known as the Provider Relief Fund.

The Trump and Biden administrations have not always been great to send the money – or send it on time. But STAT’s new analysis of a health and welfare database of money shows where it is going and who has received the most so far.

By far the largest payments were made to the largest hospital systems in the country. Five of the top 10 recipients of cash were hospitals or health systems in the New York City area; together they received about $ 3.1 billion. The New York and Presbyterian Hospital (usually referred to as NewYork-Presbyterian) alone raised $ 631 million, surpassed just one of the $ 1.2 billion that went to New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation Group that operates New York City’s sprawling public system hospitals and clinics.

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STAT also publishes the entire database here in a searchable and sortable format.

Many smaller providers also benefited from the program. Of the 412,591 payments published to date, the median was just $ 12,530. Ninety percent of all payments were below $ 192,569.

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Mississippi has the highest average payment amount of any state at $ 17,563. The Vermont average payment was the lowest at $ 3,802. In Puerto Rico, a U.S. territory with a population greater than 21 states, the average payment was only $ 1,281. Puerto Rico also received less money overall than any other state: $ 180,788,664 so far.

Below are all payments to providers in each state. First select a state and then click the column headings in the table to sort by that column, or use the search box to enter names of providers and / or cities to narrow the results.

J. Emory Parker / STAT
Source: US Health Resources & Services Administration

Bismarck Mayor on why COVID reduction cash could not offset tax improve

Given that property taxes in Bismarck will rise next year, Mayor Steve Bakken explains why the federal COVID-19 aid money was unable to offset these increases.

Bakken says Bismarck received about $ 10 million in the spring of last year, right at the start of the pandemic.

He says the money was used to fund one-off costs, such as the mass drive-through tests that were held at the city’s events center.

The American rescue plan is expected to give North Dakota even more federal COVID aid dollars, which could mean more money for Bismarck.

But Bakken says the money has not currently been approved by the state so it cannot be allocated yet.

“I have a firm policy – we don’t program a cent until we have this money. It’s just a bad way of doing business. They do not assign these funds or do not program them until you have them in hand. Relying on something that could possibly come is a bad way to do business, ”said Bakken.

State lawmakers are expected to approve and allocate the more than $ 1 billion from the US bailout plan during a special session in November.

Homelessness, psychological well being high residents’ want checklist for find out how to spend COVID-19 reduction cash – The Durango Herald

La Plata County is in no rush to determine how close to $ 11 million can be spent

Micah currently lives on the streets of Durango, where he moved from northern Minnesota three years ago. He said Durango could be the best or the worst, depending on a person’s mindset. He recently took a job as a dishwasher at Steamworks Brewing Co. and said a change in the way he thinks and attitudes has benefited his situation. (Christian Burney / Durango Herald)

When asked how La Plata County should spend nearly $ 11 million in COVID-19 relief funds, two common themes were raised by community members who focused on homelessness and mental health programs.

La Plata County has until 2024 to distribute the federal money made available through the American Rescue Plan Act. On Wednesday, the district administrators set out the guidelines for the money and heard from the public how the money should be spent.

A mix of county residents and community leaders attended the virtual meeting hosted on Zoom, which was recorded and made available online.

Several local residents were interested in using the money to help the homeless population of La Plata County. Community Compassion Outreach’s Donna Mae Baukat wanted to know how quickly funds would be allocated after district officials decided how to distribute it.

Community Compassion Outreach has initiated an application process for funding with the Department of Housing, Baukat said. She expects to know if the application will be accepted approximately 65 days after submitting it.

“So the question is, after the Commissioner has examined all the proposals, how soon, shall we say, our project – if we were to state on an input form that we want federal funding for affordable housing – how soon after your decision? will there be funding and how quickly can we know whether we are eligible or not? ”said Baukat.

About half of the total funding, $ 5.4 million, is already available, said county manager Chuck Stevens, but district officials are in no hurry to spend it and intend to take a methodical, measured approach to decide how the money is distributed.

“Every tip I’ve got from the board is that they want to be very thorough and considered,” said Stevens. “They want to get ideas from the community, they want to be very thoughtful. You don’t feel pressured to make a quick decision. It’s a really mushy answer for you, I get that. I would just say submit your project and recommendation. “

Homelessness was a key issue local residents wanted to address at a county virtual meeting on Wednesday to collect suggestions on how to spend nearly $ 11 million in federal COVID-19 aid. Manna, a soup kitchen on Avenida del Sol 1100, started with its own garden in 2004. The facility provides nutritious meals and support services to those in need, and distributes groceries from 9 am to 11 am daily. (Christian Burney / Durango Herald)

Stevens added that the commissioners and the county government will hold a working meeting towards the end of September to formally consider proposals from the public.

Harrison Wendt, a Durango resident and youth mental health advocate, also asked about the process of helping young homeless populations.

“I see it more and more worrying when our young people become homeless and live on the streets,” said Wendt. “College students who don’t have an apartment live in their cars.”

Wendt wondered how best to call for resources: should local organizations make separate requests, or would it be more effective if they banded together as a coalition to come up with one big proposal?

Stevens and District Spokesman Ted Holteen both responded that a coalition would be more effective and increase their chances of successfully distributing money where it would best serve the homeless populations of Durango and La Plata.

“Coalitions are always great,” said Holteen. “If you are like-minded people trying to express a similar problem when you can achieve this type of organization, it is certainly better to submit one form from one group than submit four forms from different people.”

Wendt also asked if mental health was an area of ​​support. He was concerned that mental health was a wide-ranging issue that existed before the COVID-19 pandemic and that it could be excluded from federal aid.

Stevens assured Wendt that mental health was eligible. He added that homelessness issues, which district officials hear about three to four times a week, are of interest to the committee.

“Mental health problems have been exacerbated by the pandemic, I think that is out of the question,” said Stevens. “I think we can conclusively prove that. So that would definitely be a qualified issue. How can we take this into account and ensure that we survive the audit? That would be for the county, but I’m confident this would be a qualified, eligible expense. “

Kristine Melrose, of rural La Plata County, raised concerns about drug use across the county, saying overdoses and a link to street drugs need to be addressed.

“I’ve been in this county all my life, several generations in this county,” said Melrose. “I’ve attended many, many funerals for people who overdosed in our county. I think this should definitely be addressed with the street drugs that are available to people. And especially for the homeless who come to our country, I feel that it’s not just about mental health, but also about the drugs that are available. I know that ultimately it is their decision to take and ingest or whatever they do, but it is still readily available and that should definitely be addressed, it shouldn’t just be an offense. “

Stevens said he believes the board wholeheartedly approves of Melrose.

The county has until 2026 to spend the money it received through the American bailout plan. Holteen said Wednesday that the board intends to allocate the money to generational projects that will have a far-reaching and lasting impact on as many of the county’s residents as possible.

The residents can submit comments, ideas and suggestions to the municipal council for consideration Online formprovided during the virtual meeting and available on the county website.

cburney@durangoherald.com

Inexperienced Lake Township Votes to Maintain Federal COVID-19 Reduction Cash

In May, members of the Green Lake Township Board in Grand Traverse County voted to distribute a portion of their federal COVID-19 aid to township workers, including elected officials.

During a community meeting on Monday, the board voted four to three to put the funds on hold.

Members plan to review where the money is going and make sure it is in line with federal guidelines.

The federal government says the aid money can be used for infrastructure, lost revenue, personal protection and equipment, and staff, as well as the salaries of elected officials.

However, the state says the money cannot go to elected officials.

Marvin Radtke, the Green Lake Township overseer, says the COVID-19 aid money should be based solely on federal guidelines as it is federal money.

Radtke says he and the community clerk invested more than 1,000 hours of overtime to protect the community during the pandemic.

“I was down in the playground and wiped things off according to the instructions of the executive,” said Radtke. “Whenever someone touched the playground equipment, they had to be wiped off.”

A community member who volunteered during the November election says Judy Kramer, Green Lake community secretary, made sure everyone was safe during the election.

“Judy Kramer took such care to keep us healthy. She made sure we had the personal protective equipment we needed, ”said Linda Pepper, a resident of Green Lake Township. “I don’t mind going ahead and rewarding someone who goes far and higher. You kept everyone sane; that is a huge achievement.

The church now plans to hold a series of meetings to get an idea of ​​where people want the funds to go.

Extra reduction cash heading to Midstate counties devastated by flooding | Information

Waverly, TN (WSMV) – More help goes to flood-ravaged Midstate Counties.

It comes in the form of grants to nonprofit and religious organizations from the Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee.

News4 spoke to Casey Johnsen when she was picking up supplies at Waverly First Baptist Church on Friday.

She and her husband moved to the area just before the Wisconsin flood disaster. You live with friends now.

“I remember the night before we were in Waverly looking at properties for sale,” said Johnsen.

Less than 24 hours later, Waverly was under the water.

“You just see water everywhere. It was just quick,” said Johnsen.

Emergency grants worth $ 200,000 will go to 11 area agencies. The grants come from the Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee to help those affected by the deadly floods.

The money will help with food, financial aid, temporary housing, and rubble removal when needed.

“Well, I appreciate all the help we can get if we have a long-term plan,” said Pastor Scott Brown of Waverly First Baptist.

Brown said he was grateful that the church will receive a $ 10,000 grant.

“It’s really just about meeting people where they are and helping them get where they want to be, but our goal is to put 100% of that money back into the community, back in The people. We don’t want to keep a dime of it, “said Brown.

For three weeks, Pastor Brown and Church volunteers spent long days serving their ward.

“Sometimes it feels like everything we do is just a drop in the ocean, but the truth is, if there are enough drops, it can fill this bucket,” Brown said.

The aid money is part of the foundation’s first funding round.

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Faculties nonetheless have billions of federal Covid aid cash to spend

Posted by Katie Lobosco, CNN

(CNN) – Congress approves more than $ 190 billion to help America’s schools reopen and stay open during the pandemic – and while much of the funding has been used to buy PPE, improve ventilation, and promote summer school programs, billions of dollars remain to be spent.

Many local school authorities have not yet decided how to use the final round of funds released in March. In most states, districts are required to submit an expense plan between mid-August and mid-September, which will be refunded when the money is used.

“I am both compassionate and frustrated with the district’s current spending rate,” said Marguerite Roza, professor at Georgetown University’s McCourt School of Public Policy and director of the Edunomics Lab research center.

The Covid aid money – which comes from three different laws – is a huge federal investment of roughly six times the core funding for fiscal year 2021. Congress gave schools more than three years to spend the newest and largest round of cash with few conditions. It is unlikely to be spent all at once, especially if used on teacher salaries or capital improvements that are paid over time.

The money should help schools provide safe, personal tuition for all students new challenges to keep kids in the classroom this fall as the delta variant spreads and families await vaccine approval for children under 12.

Schools in Texas have already topped the highest weekly number of Covid cases from last year. A Lack of bus drivers in Chicago, partly because of Resignation due to vaccination mandate, left families in search of transportation. Parents are frustrated and in some places have it Push school councils into heated debate about masks and vaccines, which fuel interest in local elections.

Here’s what we know about what schools are getting and how they are spending it.

How much money do schools get?

Not every school gets the same amount of money. The law tells states to pay out the money like Title I funding, meaning more money goes to districts with more low-income families. Some districts with very low poverty rates do not receive direct Covid aid funding – but may be eligible for some funding at the discretion of the state.

When the pandemic first broke out, the CARES bill approved about $ 13 billion for K-12 schools, or about $ 270 per student. The bill, passed in December, provided roughly $ 54 billion, or $ 1,100 per student, and the latest and greatest package, the American Rescue Plan, saw spending of $ 128 billion, according to an analysis by FutureEd amount to $ 2,600 per student. another non-partisan think tank at Georgetown University.

Schools spent a large portion of the money from the first relief law, passed a year ago, on PPE, cleaning supplies, technology, and learning management systems that helped students study from home, as well as salaries and wages – so a survey by the Association of School Management Officials carried out in February.

How can schools spend the money?

About 20% of the money a district receives goes to dealing with learning losses – this can include tutoring programs, summer schools, or extended school days in the future.

There are few other constraints on funding, however, so it is largely up to local school authorities to decide how to spend it on a wide range of pandemic-related needs.

The law states that it can be spent on things like plumbing, technology, mental health services, and ventilation systems, to name a few. However, it is not certain that all plans will be fully implemented – especially when it comes to hiring more teachers and counselors who may be hard to find.

Districts are required to solicit public contributions on the use of the money, although public relations efforts vary. Many school authorities discussed spending in public meetings throughout the summer. The topic is often referred to on agendas as the Elementary and Middle School Emergency Fund or ESSER.

States are allowed to keep 10% of the Covid education aid and decide how the money is paid out. They had to file an application with the Ministry of Education earlier this year and will receive the last third of the money once it’s approved. The department has 33 approved so far.

Expenditure plans: tutoring, psychological counseling, renovations

The decentralized nature of the US school system makes it difficult to keep track of how exactly the districts spend the money. A recent poll from the School Superintendents Association noted that the majority of districts plan to use the funds for support staff, technology for Internet access, and professional development for educators. Other top priorities are high-intensity tutoring, additional study time through remuneration of staff for longer working hours and the renovation of facilities.

The Detroit Public School District, For example, plans to use Covid aid funds to give teachers a one-time bonus, tutoring, expanding mental health services, making improvements to facilities, and reducing class size by hiring more teachers.

But not every use can be justified. The Illinois State Board of Education recently rejected the plan of a district,o Use Covid aid dollars for an artificial surface on his soccer field.

The CNN Wire
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