Native children elevate cash for Afghan refugees | Information, Sports activities, Jobs

From left, Silas Colarusso, 8, Sophie Colarusso, 13, and Amelia Colarusso, 10, hold the bookmarks, drawings and earrings they put up for sale at their booth on Park Avenue, where they raise money for Afghan refugees living on a military base in New Jersey. (Company Photo – Aaron Cerbone)

SARANAC LAKE – From a small roadside stand on Park Avenue, Silas, Sophie, and Amelia Colarusso make a big difference.

The siblings – 8, 13 and 10, respectively – are selling handicrafts from their front yard to raise money to help refugees from Taliban-controlled Afghanistan who live on a military base in New Jersey.

Her mother Kristi said she and her husband explained to their children the news about Afghanistan, the withdrawal of the US military and the takeover of the Taliban.

“We heard what happened and just wanted to help somehow.” said Amelie.

They carried a fake kitchen stand from their basement, a relic from their preschool days, and sold bookmarks, jewelry, and paintings at 425 Park Avenue. They weren’t expecting to raise a lot of money.

“Literally I said, ‘Oh man, I think we’re only going to get cents'” said Silas.

They raised $ 230 in the first three days and this money has already been sent to a church that supports the Afghan evacuees.

“The people of Saranac Lake are really generous” said Sophie.

Your customers are walkers from the neighborhood, friends of the family who stop by to see what they have set up, and drivers who step on the brakes as they drive past.

They have brightly colored origami bookmarks that fit snugly over the corners of a page. Animals are drawn on some. They have bracelets, earrings, and key chains, all made from Lego bricks and beads. Sophi has a painting of a fluffy Shiba Inu dog.

Sophie said her parents have friends in New Jersey who go to a church with a direct link to volunteers on the U.S. military’s McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst Joint Base, where about 8,500 evacuees are currently living in tented camps.

Kristi said it was overwhelming and crippling to see people flee for their lives and end up in a safe country with just what they can carry.

“We want to show our neighbors God’s love” She said.

The Colarusso children were doing handicrafts before they started selling them, but they quickly ran out of supplies and made more. They started with fixed prices for their goods but then moved on to only accepting donations because people were giving so much more money, the prices were pointless.

Last week, US Senators announced that the base will host around 4,500 refugees, with the potential to host up to 13,000. They need supplies for all of the new residents – food, clothing, and essentials.

The US is screening all refugees and preparing to find them permanent homes in America.

Last month, Governor Kathy Hochul announced that New York was ready to accept refugees from Afghanistan.

Kristi said they have been stationed outside the booth in the evenings since they resumed school in Saranac Lake last week, but they plan to keep raising money and sending donations as the needs of Afghan refugees are not going away anytime soon.

Latest news and more in your inbox

Seattle restaurant raises cash, gives assist for Afghan refugees

Kabul Afghan Cuisine is working to donate money and support those fleeing Taliban-controlled Afghanistan.

SEATTLE – A local company tries to raise funds to help refugees as tensions escalate over the airlift in Afghanistan.

The owners of the Kabul restaurant in Wallingford said they are desperate about what happened and will donate 10% of the money that is received to help the groups that work directly with refugees.

You support the work of Afghan health initiative and groups like Medical missions of the SCM. “We had to do something,” said restaurant owner Yama Khairzada.

Khairzada’s father immigrated from Afghanistan in the 1970s, and the restaurant felt it needed to reach out to the people who came from there.

>> Download the KING 5’s Roku and Amazon Fire apps to view live news and on-demand videos

Medical missions of the SCM has been working with refugees from areas such as Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan for years.

The group collects money and helps distribute goods to refugees. SCM recently sent a letter to Donors asking for help for Afghan refugees and they are connecting with those who have already arrived.

On Friday, volunteers brought household donations to a family in Tukwila who arrived with only a few items of clothing for their three daughters.

They work with other non-profit organizations trying to help families with culturally sensitive foods.

This week’s attacks add even more trauma to the grief refugees are feeling. The attacks have made it even more difficult to get in touch with relatives who are still in Afghanistan.

Americans and US allies, including Afghans who helped US forces during the war in Afghanistan, fled the now Taliban-controlled country via Kabul airport before the August 31 deadline.

The last day or so has the airlift began to unwind while the US allies complete their own evacuation mission.

A protest in solidarity with Afghanistan and those who fled Taliban rule is planned in Seattle on Saturday.

Native children promoting jewellery to assist elevate cash for Afghan refugees

Local children sell jewelry to raise money for Afghan refugees

A local family spends the week selling jewelry to raise money for Afghan refugees.

A local family spends the week selling jewelry to raise money for Afghan refugees.

The Cakaj family makes clay necklaces, hand-studded bracelets and much more. You will find the handmade item in the Mount Pleasant Farmers Market on Saturday, August 21.

Download the FOX 5 DC News App for local breaking news and weather

The idea came to them after a successful similar fundraiser they had a few years ago that raised money for families and children incarcerated on the US-Mexico border.

“A couple of weeks ago, our mother told us that some Afghan families were coming to Washington, DC, and she told us that we might be able to do a jewelry sale for them,” said Sebastian Cakaj.

He and his sister Olivia work hard to help these families in need.

“We make a lot of jewelry, so we have some pieces that we used to make, but we didn’t start making some until Monday when the Afghan crisis got more on the news.”

TIED TOGETHER: 10 members of the Afghan girls’ robot team safely evacuated

The proceeds from the sale of her homemade jewelry will go to Lutheran Social Services of the National Capital Area, one of the largest organizations in the DMV that helps arriving Afghan families.

The Cakajs hope to sell all of their jewelry to raise $ 250.