Fourth Avenue Winter Road Honest in jeopardy if cash isn’t raised

TUCSON, Ariz. (KOLD News 13) – The Fourth Avenue Merchants Association needs community help to make this year’s Winter Street Festival a reality.

The association is dependent on the street festival for its operation, but the last three trade fairs have been canceled due to the pandemic.

“Since we are 99% funded by the street festival, the failure to continue the street festival could definitely lead to the demise of the Fourth Avenue Merchants Association and everything we do to help small businesses down here,” said Daniel Matlick, board president of the Trade Association Fourth Avenue.

Every year the fair attracts hundreds of thousands of people and brings in hundreds of thousands of dollars. Matlick said the street fair money will be used to pay the upfront costs of the event and the rest will be used for upkeep along Fourth Avenue.

“We’re able to maintain the streets, the garbage, the power washing, and make Fourth Avenue a place people want to go,” said Casey Anderson, chief operating officer of the Fourth Avenue Merchants Association.

The street festival is also a big money maker for the traders, restaurants and artists involved.

“We have a tent out there and the store is open too,” said Tonia Clevenger, an employee at Rustic Candle on Fourth Avenue. “It’s just great fun and very busy.”

Clevenger hopes the tradition will return this year in the interests of businesses and those who love Fourth Avenue.

“A lot of people describe the avenue as the heart of Tucson,” she said. “It’s the eclectic feeling that brings Tucson together.”

Marlick said the club is working on reserve funds and will need to raise about $ 280,000 to hold the Winter Street Festival, which is scheduled for December 10th, 11th and 12th. Find out more about the fair and how you can donate. here.

Copyright 2021 KOLD News 13. All rights reserved.

Cash raised for Mikella McAuley donated to Leukemia & Lymphoma Society

BAKERSFIELD, Calif. (KGET) – It’s been 20 years since the community gathered around a little girl to save her life. Thousands of strangers willing to give a piece of themselves so that Mikella McAuley could survive. Unfortunately, she passed away just a few months later at the tender age of 6. But now other children like Mikella are getting a second chance in life thanks to a generous donation from their family.

Mikella McAuley had an unforgettable smile and a sweet spirit – but she was diagnosed with leukemia in late 2000. Her only chance of survival was a bone marrow transplant.

In 2001, two mobile bone marrow screening drives in Bakersfield brought out more than 2,000 people – strangers who waited for hours to see if they could be Mikella’s competition. At the time, it cost just under $ 100 per person to be included in the registry, but that cost was offset by multiple fundraisers hosted by friends and family members of the McAuleys.

Unfortunately, Mikella died before a bone marrow match could be found. But because of their struggle, the Houchin blood bank became a permanent place where people could be enrolled in the bone marrow registry to help others.

“There was money left over from fundraising,” said Christa McAuley, Mikella’s mother. “I donated to the Houchin Blood Bank because I wanted to keep their legacy alive and to help others. And so, anyone tested or enrolled in Kern County’s registration or bone marrow approvals in the past 20 years has been donated to this fund for free. “

But thanks to advances in technology, enrollment in the bone marrow registry is now free. That is why Christa McAuley set up a charitable foundation with the remaining funds. She recently donated $ 10,000 to the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society in memory of her daughter.

“I chose the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society for obvious reasons,” said McAuley. “Because Mikella died of CML, of leukemia, and they’re one of the non-profit organizations that actually help families when they’re going through a crisis.”

“In Kern County, $ 10,000 can go as far and we have so many patients who just need travel assistance, co-payment assistance, so many things, patient services, and research. It really means a lot to us, ”said Barbara DeMita, Campaign Development Manager at LLS.

Now the community touched by Mikella’s story will benefit from the many kindnesses shown to this little girl 20 years ago.

“For me, for her mother, I will never forget her, but this is how Kern County can remember my daughter and her legacy because she was such a great little girl. She brought a community together for one cause, and that cause was to save her life. “

Research into treating childhood leukemia has come this far in the past 20 years, according to LLS.
Back then, the most common form of leukemia had a survival rate of 73%; today it is up to 95%.

Cash raised for Ben Dixon Celebration of Life

Amy and Dave Dixon planned to celebrate their son’s life after losing him to cancer. They knew what food they were going to serve, but what happened next was unexpected.

FORT COLLINS, Colorado – The saying goes, food brings people together.

In the case of Amy and Dave Dixon, the food is used to honor such a loved one, their son Ben.

Ben, 11 years old, recently died after fighting for two years Ewing’s sarcoma, a form of cancer.

“He was really loved,” said Amy Dixon. “Especially when he started his battle with cancer, his story was connected to a lot of people and a lot of people wanted to know him afterwards.”

By the time Amy and Dave were planning Ben’s Celebration of Life event at the end of the month, they knew exactly what kind of food to serve; Sandwiches from his favorite place.

The cancer treatments prevented Ben from eating his favorite sandwiches Snack Attack Specialty Sandwiches and Brews in Fort Collins.

“He loved it and he always wanted to go, but we couldn’t let him go,” Amy said.

Co-owner Lauren and Shawn Storeby were once neighbors to Amy and Dave.

“I wrote to Lauren asking how much it would cost 300 sandwiches, asked if they could do that. And she said we could absolutely do it, “said Amy.

She was blown away by the reaction of the locally run shop.

“I said we will, but I won’t make you an offer. We will take care of it and the community will fund it for you because that is exactly what we do. Said Lauren Storeby.

The Storeby’s have gone one step further start a GoFundMe with a goal of $ 1,500 to raise money for the sandwiches, but the store is also accepting donations at the checkout and online.

By Sunday afternoon, the store had raised more than $ 3,000 in total.

“We had to do something,” said Shawn Storeby. “That was our goal to make them known and to show them that there are other people out there and that they are not alone.”

Amy and Dave said they were naturally grateful for the generosity of the community.

“The Fort Collins-Loveland community has always been just great for us,” said Amy. “It’s too much for a family. So – I mean anything we get beyond the sandwiches, which we will absolutely do well. “Use in the community.”

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Altdeus, Tokyo Chronos Dev Raised Extra Cash For Extra VR

Altdeus: Beyond Chronos and Tokyo Chronos developer MyDearest isn’t going anywhere; It has just raised $ 8.2 million in a new round of funding.

The financing round was led by Globis Captial Partners and brings the total financing of the Japanese studio to currently around 11.1 million US dollars. In a press release, the studio stated that these funds would be used to expand the studio, launch an online community for its fan base, and bring players “deeper and richer adventures” in the future.

In a prepared statement, Kento Kishigami, CEO of MyDearest, said the studio will “act as the vanguard of Japanese VR game developers influencing the world market.”

MyDearest’s two VR games are both unique interpretations of the visual novel genre for headsets. Tokyo Chronos offered a long story-driven experience when it was released in 2019, and the developer followed suit a year later with Altdeus, which was set in the game world as the original game but thrown far into the future.

We thought Altdeus in particular would be a great improvement on the developer’s formula, awarded 4/5 in our rating. “After adding new language options and the much-needed immersion to the core gameplay, I was totally immersed in the history of ALTDEUS overall,” we said. “Although the interactivity remains minimal compared to other VR games, this game is highly recommended for visual novel fans.” The game recently got a story extension, but MyDearest has not yet announced its next project.

What are you hoping for next from MyDearest? Let us know in the comments below!

Native ministry raised cash to fight homelessness and meals insecurity

BLOOMINGTON, Ill. (WMBD) – A local government department raised funds through a community challenge in May to help tackle homelessness and food insecurity in Bloomington.

A group of donors raised $ 40,000 and asked community members to add to their contributions.

Home Sweet Home Ministries, a nonprofit, non-denominational Christian organization, ended up raising a total of $ 99,013.

Matt Burgess, chief executive officer of Home Sweet Home Ministries, said he appreciates the support of all who have an impact on the people they serve.

“Our generous donors have ensured that Home Sweet Home Ministries can continue to run
Providing basic services to people affected by homelessness and food insecurity in our community.
Thank you for giving hope to those in need, ”said Burgess.

Wisconsin city raised cash for faculty scholarships for all seniors

GRESHAM – Bob Klopke knew how expensive higher education can be.

He had just sent the youngest of his three daughters to college, and as the principal of Gresham School, he had seen many other students doing the same.

Given the success of Shawano’s Dollars for Scholars program, which has been raising funds for scholarships for high school graduates pursuing post-secondary education since 1993, he believed that Gresham students could benefit from such a program as well.

In 2001, Klopke began sending letters to people in the community who he believed would be interested in setting up a fund and holding meetings.

Before Klopke and the group even asked for donations, he told him that a farmer who lived north of town would hand him $ 100 or $ 200 out of the blue and simply tell him to “use this to get the fund going bring “.

Twenty years later, after Gresham residents like this farmer contributed just $ 5 here or $ 10 there, the community raised $ 1 million for the Gresham Scholarship Fund to help the small town’s youngest residents to pay for higher education.

Over time, the scholarship amount has also increased. At the start of the scholarship, the awards were $ 400 per qualified student. Now students are getting $ 3,250.

Newell Haffner, superintendent of the Gresham School District, said the fund had “had a major impact” in what he described as “economically depressed”.

Data from the State Department of Public Instruction shows that about three in five students in the district of about 250 students are considered economically disadvantaged.

To make it as accessible as possible, the scholarship is available to all seniors as long as they are aiming for post-secondary education and have a grade point average of at least 2.0.

“I think some of our students would not have gone to college or could not have afforded it without the scholarship,” said Haffner. “It serves the children and the community by giving them a leg up.”

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Shawano School District has considered closing Gresham School since the 1950s as a cost-cutting measure, said Curt Knoke, who volunteers for the Shawano Area Community Foundation, which owns the Gresham Scholarship Fund foundation.

Just over a decade ago, when Shawano reconsidered closing Gresham School, residents overwhelmingly backed a referendum to withdraw from Shawano and start their own new school district.

This community pride led to Klopke’s confidence that he could set up a scholarship fund for Gresham alumni.

Unlike Shawano’s Dollars for Scholars program, which received individual donations close to $ 1 million, Gresham had few deep pocket donors and broad community support.

Most contributions to the fund over the years have been $ 500 or less. To date, the largest donation the fund has ever received was just over $ 30,000, Knoke said.

Over the past few years, around $ 20,000 has been added up from the fund’s annual fundraising banquet, one of the city’s biggest events of the year, where residents raise money for a good cause – the students – and for good food and fun together to have.

In 2019, seven cakes donated by the Red Rooster Cafe in Bonduel were auctioned for $ 4,650.

“It’s pretty amazing that a small town can raise $ 1 million without a large donor,” said Dan Huntington, owner of the Gresham Hardware Store, who acts as the auctioneer at the event and makes a frequent donation to the fund. “It says a lot about the community. There is a strong sense of community and support for our school here after we almost lost it.”

Mindy Hoffman grew up on a dairy farm with five siblings and always knew college would be something she would have to work for.

Eleven years after graduating from Gresham High School as a valedictorian and receiving a $ 750 scholarship, Hoffman is now a physical therapist at St. Mary’s Hospital in Green Bay. She received her bachelor’s degree from Viterbo University, a small Catholic college in La Crosse, and her PhD in physical therapy from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

“This was one of the scholarships that helped me get through Undergrad and put me on a good path to start Grad school,” said Hoffman.

What also helped Hoffman get through school is knowing that at home she has a community that takes root for her.

“The people who go to the banquet and donate – they are the people my parents work with, they are the people I see in the store and ask how I am, and they are the ones who want to see you thrive and they are very supportive, “said Hoffman. “I’m so happy to have this.”

For Bruce Stoehr, who grew up in Gresham and moved to Green Bay, where he was a doctor until his retirement, the investment is well worth it. He said he enjoyed seeing his friends’ grandchildren graduate and receive the Gresham Scholarship.

“The enthusiasm this generated has breathed new life into the Gresham community,” said Stöhr. “What it has done for the community, the city and the students is incredible.”

While $ 1 million is “huge” for such a small town, Knoke believes her job is far from over as college keeps getting more expensive.

“It’s just amazing for a small town,” said Knoke. “But $ 3,000 is only about 3% of college education. I say we can do better, so I say let’s move on.”

Interested parties can donate online at donner.cffoxvalley.org/Make-A-Giftor send a check to the Gresham Scholarship Fund at PO Box 102, Gresham, WI 54128.

Contact reporter Samantha West at 920-996-7207 or swest@gannett.com. Follow her on Twitter below @ BySamanthaWest.

Cash raised, spent not figuring out consider Fayetteville elections

FAYETTEVILLE – Raising or spending more money on a campaign didn’t necessarily mean winning the city’s races for the local office.

Municipal candidates were required to submit final campaign contributions and spending reports for the November 3rd general election by December 30th. This is in addition to the pre-election reports and reports related to the December 1 runoff election, if applicable.

Candidates for the city’s mayor and council races in the general election raised around $ 145,000 in total, with more than $ 135,000 spent on campaigning.

Mayor Lioneld Jordan won re-election for a fourth term, surpassing his closest opponent, Tom Terminella. Jordan raised more than $ 38,000 on $ 21,750 from Terminella. Jordan also spent more than $ 33,000 on his campaign while Terminella only spent more than $ 21,700. Jordan received 24,641 votes, or 68%, and Terminella 9,050 votes, or 25%.

Mayoral candidates Ron Baucom and William Harris, whose total vote was 2,716, or 7%, raised no money and only spent more than $ 200 apiece. Baucom spent $ 241 on signs and business cards, while Harris spent $ 227 on office supplies, brochures, and business cards.

Terminella submitted its final report on the general election on late January 8, according to the Washington County Clerk’s Office postage stamp.

Twelve contestants in the city’s four city races raised around $ 85,000 in total and reportedly spent around $ 80,000.

Two candidates for Ward 1 – Tanner Pettigrew and Oroo Oyioka – have submitted their final reports for the general election on Friday and Thursday, respectively. Three councilors – Pedro Fimbres Jr. in Station 1, Matthew Petty in Station 2, and Kyle Smith in Station 4 – filed their final reports a day later on December 31st.

The Arkansas Ethics Commission will generally only investigate a potential violation, e.g. B. if a complaint is not submitted correctly or in time when a complaint is submitted. The Commission can impose fines or send a letter of referral if it determines that there has been a breach.

D’Andre Jones won the Ward 1 seat against Pettigrew in a runoff election. Jones raised just over $ 10,300 and spent more than $ 14,000 on the general election. His pre-election report for the runoff showed he had raised nearly $ 2,500 and only spent more than $ 1,800.

With that, Jones has raised more than $ 12,000 in total and spent more than $ 16,000. He also started his campaign with $ 1,000 and borrowed $ 1,600.

A volunteer campaign worker for Jones said he raised a little more money during the runoff and made up the difference with a loan to himself. A final outflow report due Feb. 1 will reflect the amounts, she said.

The money reflected in Pettigrew’s general election reports and pre-election runoff report showed that he led Jones in donations with about $ 18,000 and only more than $ 16,000 in expenses.

Jones led Pettigrew in the November 3rd election by 3,108 votes, or 38%, to Pettigrew’s 2,413 votes, or 30%. Jones won the runoff election on December 1 by 1,040 votes, or 72%, compared to Pettigrew’s 408 votes, or 28% according to the unofficial number of votes.

Fimbres raised $ 4,400 and spent $ 4,060. Oyioka reported $ 439 in funds raised with $ 1,252 for its campaign.

Station 2 candidates, Petty and William Chesser, raised comparable sums of money of approximately $ 8,900 each. Petty, the incumbent, only spent more than $ 5,000 on his campaign, compared to $ 8,900 on Chesser’s spending.

Petty won the race with 64% of the vote, or 4,135 total votes. Chesser got 2,300, or 36%.

Peter Tonnessen did not raise money in his campaign to depose incumbent Ward 3 Councilor Sarah Bunch, who raised $ 6,350. Tonnessen spent $ 1,470 on Bunchs $ 3,913.

Bunch won re-election by 54 points with 7,548 votes, or 77%, over Tonnessen’s 2,258 votes, or 23%.

Kyle Smith, who was named to his seat in Ward 4 by the city council in 2017, has surpassed and surpassed eventual winner of the race, Holly Hertzberg. Smith raised $ 19,760 to $ 14,870 from Hertzberg. He also spent $ 20,515, compared to $ 15,027 Hertzberg spent on their campaign.

Smith borrowed $ 2,000 for his campaign. Hertzberg had a $ 157 loan to make up the difference between the amounts earned and spent.

Hertzberg won the election on November 3rd with 4,894 votes, or 51% and a majority. Smith received 3,043 votes, or 31%. Paul Waddell finished third with 942 votes, or 10%, and perennial candidate Adam Fire Cat got 774, or 8%.

Waddell raised $ 1,925 and spent $ 1,942. Fire Cat raised no money but did spend $ 13 on advertising.

More news

Election deadlines

If a candidate was rejected and raised or spent more than $ 500, the November 3rd general election required a campaign contribution and expense report. The reports covered all activities through October 24th.

Each candidate was required to submit a final report on the general election, regardless of whether money was raised or spent. The final report was due on December 30th. If the candidate filed the pre-election report and was not in the runoff election, the period covered was October 25th to the date submitted. If the candidate filed a pre-election report and went to a runoff election, the activity spanned October 25 through November 3.

A pre-election report for the December 1 runoff was due on November 24 and covered activities from November 4 to November 21.

The final report for the runoff election is due on February 1st. It is valid for November 22nd until the submitted date.

Source: Washington County Electoral Commission

Stacy Ryburn can be reached by email at [email protected] or on Twitter @stacyryburn.

Cash raised, spent not figuring out consider Fayetteville elections

FAYETTEVILLE – Raising or spending more money on a campaign didn’t necessarily mean winning the city’s races for the local office.

Municipal candidates were required to submit final campaign contributions and spending reports for the November 3rd general election by December 30th. This is in addition to the pre-election reports and reports related to the December 1 runoff election, if applicable.

Candidates for the city’s mayor and council races in the general election raised around $ 145,000 in total, with more than $ 135,000 spent on campaigning.

Mayor Lioneld Jordan won re-election for a fourth term, surpassing his closest opponent, Tom Terminella. Jordan raised more than $ 38,000 on $ 21,750 from Terminella. Jordan also spent more than $ 33,000 on his campaign while Terminella only spent more than $ 21,700. Jordan received 24,641 votes, or 68%, and Terminella 9,050 votes, or 25%.

Mayoral candidates Ron Baucom and William Harris, whose total vote was 2,716, or 7%, raised no money and only spent more than $ 200 apiece. Baucom spent $ 241 on signs and business cards, while Harris spent $ 227 on office supplies, brochures, and business cards.

Terminella submitted its final report on the general election on late January 8, according to the Washington County Clerk’s Office postage stamp.

Twelve contestants in the city’s four city races raised around $ 85,000 in total and reportedly spent around $ 80,000.

Two candidates for Ward 1 – Tanner Pettigrew and Oroo Oyioka – have submitted their final reports for the general election on Friday and Thursday, respectively. Three councilors – Pedro Fimbres Jr. in Station 1, Matthew Petty in Station 2, and Kyle Smith in Station 4 – filed their final reports a day later on December 31st.

The Arkansas Ethics Commission will generally only investigate a potential violation, e.g. B. if a complaint is not submitted correctly or in time when a complaint is submitted. The Commission can impose fines or send a letter of referral if it determines that there has been a breach.

D’Andre Jones won the Ward 1 seat against Pettigrew in a runoff election. Jones raised just over $ 10,300 and spent more than $ 14,000 on the general election. His pre-election report for the runoff showed he had raised nearly $ 2,500 and only spent more than $ 1,800.

With that, Jones has raised more than $ 12,000 in total and spent more than $ 16,000. He also started his campaign with $ 1,000 and borrowed $ 1,600.

A volunteer campaign worker for Jones said he raised a little more money during the runoff and made up the difference with a loan to himself. A final outflow report due Feb. 1 will reflect the amounts, she said.

The money reflected in Pettigrew’s general election reports and pre-election runoff report showed that he led Jones in donations with about $ 18,000 and only more than $ 16,000 in expenses.

Jones led Pettigrew in the November 3rd election by 3,108 votes, or 38%, to Pettigrew’s 2,413 votes, or 30%. Jones won the runoff election on December 1 by 1,040 votes, or 72%, compared to Pettigrew’s 408 votes, or 28% according to the unofficial number of votes.

Fimbres raised $ 4,400 and spent $ 4,060. Oyioka reported $ 439 in funds raised with $ 1,252 for its campaign.

Station 2 candidates, Petty and William Chesser, raised comparable sums of money of approximately $ 8,900 each. Petty, the incumbent, only spent more than $ 5,000 on his campaign, compared to $ 8,900 on Chesser’s spending.

Petty won the race with 64% of the vote, or 4,135 total votes. Chesser got 2,300, or 36%.

Peter Tonnessen did not raise money in his campaign to depose incumbent Ward 3 Councilor Sarah Bunch, who raised $ 6,350. Tonnessen spent $ 1,470 on Bunchs $ 3,913.

Bunch won re-election by 54 points with 7,548 votes, or 77%, over Tonnessen’s 2,258 votes, or 23%.

Kyle Smith, who was named to his seat in Ward 4 by the city council in 2017, has surpassed and surpassed eventual winner of the race, Holly Hertzberg. Smith raised $ 19,760 to $ 14,870 from Hertzberg. He also spent $ 20,515, compared to $ 15,027 Hertzberg spent on their campaign.

Smith borrowed $ 2,000 for his campaign. Hertzberg had a $ 157 loan to make up the difference between the amounts earned and spent.

Hertzberg won the election on November 3rd with 4,894 votes, or 51% and a majority. Smith received 3,043 votes, or 31%. Paul Waddell finished third with 942 votes, or 10%, and perennial candidate Adam Fire Cat got 774, or 8%.

Waddell raised $ 1,925 and spent $ 1,942. Fire Cat raised no money but did spend $ 13 on advertising.

More news

Election deadlines

If a candidate was rejected and raised or spent more than $ 500, the November 3rd general election required a campaign contribution and expense report. The reports covered all activities through October 24th.

Each candidate was required to submit a final report on the general election, regardless of whether money was raised or spent. The final report was due on December 30th. If the candidate filed the pre-election report and was not in the runoff election, the period covered was October 25th to the date submitted. If the candidate filed a pre-election report and went to a runoff election, the activity spanned October 25 through November 3.

A pre-election report for the December 1 runoff was due on November 24 and covered activities from November 4 to November 21.

The final report for the runoff election is due on February 1st. It is valid for November 22nd until the submitted date.

Source: Washington County Electoral Commission

Stacy Ryburn can be reached by email at sryburn@nwadg.com or on Twitter @stacyryburn.