Alumni elevate cash for most cancers, males’s well being with growing-out-mustache marketing campaign

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The facial hair waxing for the month of November is very important to Adam Brodstein. He is a member of Syracuse University’s fundraising team for Movember, an annual campaign to raise awareness of prostate and testicular cancer, as well as mental health and suicide prevention. Growing out a mustache or facial hair is the iconic symbol of the fundraising challenge.

“I almost never have facial hair. I wear a mustache all month and so many of my friends come up to me and ask, ‘Oh, what’s your mustache?’ ”Said Brodstein. “It just gives me one excuse to talk about it.”

Brodstein, a 2018 graduate of SU, joined the university’s Movember fundraising team while studying. However, he is not alone in his efforts. The SU team, Boys Things, has over 100 members, many of whom are SU alumni or current students. Boys Things has been part of Movember for almost a decade, growing in size and money every year. Boys Things is Movembers’ No. 1 University Team in terms of money raised, and the No. 4 team in the United States for 2021 and raised over $ 67,500 by Sunday evening.

“We all realized that (Movembers Mission) really has an impact on all of our lives. And then (Boys Things) really got expanded, ”said Brodstein.

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Movember was founded in Australia in 2003. Originally it was only supposed to raise money for prostate cancer and men’s health. Over the course of nearly two decades, Movember, an abbreviation of the words mustache – or “mo” for short – and November has grown into a global initiative in which teams collect donations 19 countries plus Hong Kong. Individuals, teams or companies can take part in the initiative. Individuals can also donate to the cause through a participating fundraiser or team.

Boys Things has grown under the guidance of 2017 graduate Michael Dellon. He is currently the team’s captain and has been in this role for seven years. Dellon’s journey with Movember began as a philanthropic project within his fraternity. However, his personal commitment to Movember has led him to expand the reach of the fundraiser since he graduated.

“The reason I became captain is because I actually survived cancer twice, so it was something that really got me excited,” said Dellon.

Movember and Boys Things rely on grassroots donations, with members posting on social media and contacting family and friends.
Courtesy Michael Dellon

Dellon contributed to the success of Boys Things fundraising as captain. His goal is to increase member engagement on the team by promoting social media advertising and grassroots fundraising.

“I always move the goalposts a bit,” said Dellon. “We met our goal of ($ 60,000); I’ll probably move that to something that’s achievable but higher. “

This year Dellon and other celebrity Boys Things held a personal fundraiser at The Craic, a Brooklyn bar where the team raised nearly $ 10,000. The personal fundraiser was Boys Things’ biggest event this month, and Dellon hopes to host more of it. He also wants to supply the SU alumni in cities outside of New York City.

“I think it might be cool if we have another event in Boston or LA,” said Dellon. “If we have the team out there that supports it in some way, then we are definitely something to be prepared for.”

The team emphasizes its basic approach to fundraising and relies on the connections maintained through the team’s social network. This method encompasses a variety of fundraising strategies, including reaching out to individual family members and friends and posting graphics on social media.

Noah Garson, a 2018 SU graduate and third highest fundraiser for Boys Things, has been participating in Movember for five years. He has had success at fundraising on Instagram, relying on consistent story posts and reminders from the month-long campaign. He stressed the importance of having a strong reason for fundraising.

“I think I raised about $ 300 in my first year. But since then … I find a different motivation every year. It was the first few years for Michael, ”said Garson. “In 2019 my father was diagnosed with cancer. And that was above all my motivation. “

Within the Page for boys things There is a tracker on the Movember website for the money raised by the team as a whole and the money raised by each member. These features provide an easy way for the team and individual members to track their progress and growth from year to year and continuously break their own records.

Due to the team’s success in the leaderboards this year, Dellon would like to continue recruiting fundraisers at the SU and increase the presence of the fundraising initiative on campus.

“It’s all about not just recruiting more people, but the right people, and getting the word out where we can,” said Dellon. “The greatest thing is simply trying to make the team an extension of Syracuse and leaving it open to anyone who wants to help and make a difference.”

Firefighter bikes coast to coast to boost cash for psychological well being providers

EL PASO, Texas (KTSM) – This one-of-a-kind team, a man, a dog, and his bike, travel 3,700 miles across the country to raise funds and raise awareness about mental health issues.

You will traverse a total of eight states on a route known as the “Southern Tier” that begins in San Diego, California and ends in St. Augustine, Florida.

Kevin Conley Jr. and his dog Rocky made their way to El Paso as they begin the long stretch of the Lone Star State.

The goal was to improve yourself and for a greater purpose.

“My original goal was to get my mind free to clear all the pain and suffering my mind was going through, and I wanted to give back for a bigger cause,” said Conley Jr.

That purpose is to raise money for the Wildland Firefighter Foundation, a foundation that focuses on helping families of firefighters killed on duty and helping injured firefighters and their families.

Conley Jr. is a wilderness firefighter who has his own struggles, and Rocky loves to help and join.

“He’s always there for me, this is my best friend here,” said Conley Jr.

He says that although his mental health motivated him to start, he wants to get it not about him: “It’s about children who never speak to their father again and women who never speak to their best friend again become … I just want to raise money for the Wildlife Firefighter Foundation so that we can give something back to this world. “

To donate to Kevin’s and Rocky’s fundraiser, click here Donation to Kevin’s and Rocky’s Southern Tier, 3,700 Mile Drive for the Mental Health of Wildland Firefighters – Wildland Firefighter Foundation (givecloud.co)

For local and breaking news, sports, weather alerts, videos, and more, download the FREE KTSM 9 news app from the. down Apple App Store or the Google Play Store.

Bent Paddle Serving to Increase Cash, Consciousness of Psychological Well being Providers with New Beer Launch Thursday

$ 1 for every pint and $ 5 for every growler or crowler of the new Pay It Forward Pale Ale purchased goes back to Amberwing.

DULUTH, Minn .– Experts Say Mental Health Problems in Children and Adolescents are On the Rise. So an organization and a brewery are working together to promote a new beer that is raising money for mental health resources.

Bell Bank’s Pay-It-Forward Launch Party at Bent Paddle Brewing this Thursday is raising funds for Amberwing, a Duluth-based center for the wellbeing of youth and families.

In a survey sent by the organization, the results showed that the prevalence of depression in the Duluth area has increased by 25% among those under 35 since the beginning of the pandemic.

Experts there said it is important to spot signs that your child is suffering from depression and anxiety, such as: For example, staying home from school more, isolating yourself, or feeling more sad or anxious in general.

“The earlier the intervention, the more effectively the children can learn the skills that we teach at Amberwing and apply them in everyday life,” says Becky Hoversten-Mellem, Clinical Supervisor.

They say one of the barriers was that it was embarrassing to seek help, and even 18% reported the cost of treatment or didn’t know where to go.

Organizers say everyone should know about the mental health resources in the city and reach out to them when needed.

“It’s important for the community to know that it’s okay to ask for help,” said Hoversten-Mellem. “Don’t hold back when you’re having trouble, let an adult know you need help.”

Bent Paddle’s new Pay It Forward Pale Ale will be unveiled at Thursday’s event. $ 1 for every pint and $ 5 for every Growler or Crowler purchased goes back to Amberwing for approximately the next month.

“We’re always looking for ways to bring people together and solve problems, and for many, many, many eons a lot of this has been done over a pint,” said Pepin Young, director of the taproom and retail operations.

The event runs from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Metallic Detecting fans increase cash for Augusta Well being Breast Imaging Heart

RAPHINE, Va. (WHSV) – From Saturday through Sunday afternoon, the New Jersey-based Deep Search Metal Detecting Club held an artifact hunt and fundraiser on the farm of Mare Scott, the daughter of the late Willard Scott, in Raphine.

Over 60 metal hunters from all over the east coast came to Rat Barn Farm in Raphine for the Mary Dwyer Scott Memorial Fundraiser.

Anyone looking for artifacts on the property paid an entrance fee, and all money raised goes to the Augusta Health Breast Imaging Center.

“We’re excited to raise money for such a worthy foundation while having fun and exploring history,” said Bob Funk, member of the club and one of the organizers of the event.

Many of the attendees travel everywhere for metal search events to find pieces from history.

“We’re always looking for ancient artifacts and relics and obviously trying to find old coins and jewelry, things like that,” said Joe Zitelli, one of the attendees. “A lot of cool things came up. We have some old buttons, other kinds of old artifacts. “

Items found on the 250-acre property included old coins, farm implements, and musket balls, some of which date from the 1700s and 1800s.

“It’s pretty cool to find something. The first time you find it you really have no idea what it is and then you do your research and learn and determine what it is. Metal detection is really about learning and history, ”said Zitelli.

Participants said they are passionate about finding items that tell the stories of people who lived many years before.

“It’s about telling a story. It’s just about getting it off the ground and you know a lot of the military things are special because the people who served our country shouldn’t be forgotten, the things they sacrificed, “Michael said Hollowell, a subscriber who has his own metal detection YouTube channel called Great Finds.

“We found colonial coins and you dig something up and wonder when this farmer dropped it, could he support his family that day because he lost a few coins?” Said Bob Funk.

The event raised a total of $ 8,000 for the Augusta Health Breast Imaging Center.

Copyright 2021 WHSV. All rights reserved.

Will Bike Four Meals cyclists increase cash for hundreds dealing with meals insecurity

HATFIELD, Massachusetts (WWLP) – Hundreds of cyclists rode through scenic Pioneer Valley on the first Sunday of Fall to raise funds for the Food Bank of Western Massachusetts.

An agency that tries to feed 100,000 people a month who are facing food insecurity.

“This is a decrease from last November’s peak when we provided food to 125,000 people, but that’s still 20 percent more than before the pandemic, so we’re nowhere near out of the woods,” said Andrew Morehouse, executive director of the Food Bank of Western Massachusetts.

The “Will Bike 4 Food” fundraiser was held virtually last year due to COVID restrictions, so it was good for everyone to be back.

“With every dollar the board takes, they can buy four meals for families in need of food in western Massachusetts, which is incredible,” said Brian Lapis. “You can do the 10 miles, the 25.50, or the 100 miles if that’s your thing.”

As a moderator, 22News Storm Team meteorologist Brian Lapis gathered the cyclists at the start line before sending them on their way.

It started with cyclists taking a 25-mile ride starting in Hatfield. They trained hard for this event, but the win doesn’t mean as much to them as the fundraiser itself.

Susan Galereave, a cyclist from Florence, said, “Yes, we are not for the speed, we are for the team spirit to raise money for the Food Bank of Western Massachusetts. A great purpose, just a fun day to be on our bikes. “

“Many of us take our access to food for granted and there are so many locals who don’t,” said Laurel Turk from Sunderland.

Since the first Will Bike 4 Food in 2011, the Food Bank of Western Massachusetts has raised over $ 1 million, the equivalent of 4.5 million meals for our neighbors in need. Your food will be distributed to 175 local pantries in all four counties in western Massachusetts.

JHS Class of 1970 elevate cash for scholarship

JONESBORO, Ark. (KAIT) – The 1970 Jonesboro High School class remembered more than just seeing them again on Saturday night.

The reunion took place at The Gardens at Harmony, and classmates and family members gathered for dinner and auction after the event was postponed for a year due to COVID concerns.

The auction, run by class members, was used to raise funds for a Vo-Tech scholarship.

Organizer Brenda Posey Knight said they chose a Vo-Tech Scholarship to provide more financial opportunities for students entering careers.

“Many times Vo-Tech kids are overlooked because they don’t have as many opportunities for scholarships, so we try to raise funds to send others to advance their education in the career of their choice,” Knight said.

Starting Saturday night, the class raised $ 2,500 for the scholarship.

To donate for the scholarship, you can send cash or a check to:

JHS class 1970

C / O: Brenda Posey Knight

1433 Flintstrasse

Jonesboro, Ark. 72401

Copyright 2021 KAIT. All rights reserved.

Wooster races goal to boost cash for sustainable agriculture in Ethiopia

Most people may never have heard of Waliso, also written Woliso or Wolisso, but three Wooster races aim to raise money for the South Ethiopian community in the name of sustainable agriculture.

The Bethel Agriculture Association will hold a 5k and a 10k on Saturday at 9 a.m. at the Secrest Arboretum and the Ohio State University Agricultural Technical Institute.

Warren Dick, the president and director of Bethel Agriculture, organized Running for Agricultural Resilience in Africa in hopes of raising $ 25,000 for the construction of two buildings in the Ethiopian city.

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“We want to build four buildings on the property, but these two will be built with donations from this race,” said Dick.

The buildings will include a guest room, computer and reading room, kitchen and dining area. The rooms will be designed for international workers and local community members who need the space.

Land for an office building and analytical laboratory has already been acquired and is being funded elsewhere, Dick said.

Sustainable agriculture

While Dick said Waliso was spared the worst civil war between the Ethiopian government and the armed forces in Tigray, the region has seen a lot in terms of drought, floods and locusts.

This has sometimes culminated in famine and regions with no food or clean water, he said.

Dick and Bethel Agriculture aim to educate Waliso residents about how to best manage the land and produce food for their community in a sustainable and effective way.

“Ethiopia is currently the worst case scenario for food security in the world,” said Dick, who has visited the East African country several times. “It is good to distribute food, but our project is to help the people of Ethiopia develop their own food production system.”

The site on which the buildings will be erected will serve as an agricultural extension, similar to the OSU extension in Wayne County.

Aim to create a self-sustaining industry

Once built, Dick aims to create a self-sustaining industry that doesn’t rely too heavily on food donations, if at all.

Climate change is another factor affecting food production in the region, he said.

“The rapid population growth in Ethiopia, the scarcity of land and a changing climate have put increasing pressure on the land, especially in the highlands, which comprise 95% of the country’s cultivated land”, The Bethel Agriculture Association website reads.

Not only do Dick and his team hope to create a better farming system and educate people, but they also want to mitigate the impact of agriculture on climate change on a global and local level.

Anyone who wants to take part in the 5k and 10k can register or sponsor a participant at MidOhioRaceManagement.com.

Contact Bryce at bbuyakie@gannett.com

On twitter: @Bryce_Buyakie

Biking Groups Elevate Cash For Group Foster Throughout 24-Hour Spin Relay – CBS Pittsburgh

By: KDKA-TV News Staff

PITTSBURGH (KDKA) – A 24-hour film crew raises money for Team Foster, a charity that honors the service and sacrifice of Captain Erick Foster, an Oil City alum and Duquesne who died fighting in Iraq.

The group raises money to provide service dogs for injured and disabled veterans free of charge.

“PTSD and brain injuries are typical wounds of warfare after 9/11. We literally have hundreds of thousands of men and women suffering from these challenges. As a result, we lose over 20 veterans and service staff to suicide every day, and we know these dogs literally save lives, ”said Nick Liermann, Executive Director of Team Foster.

Team Foster hopes to raise $ 50,000 by the end of the 24-hour journey.

The group intends to double this amount next year.

Children elevate cash for hospital staff who look after COVID-19 sufferers

A family of four from the city of Atlantis, South Florida – who had and won a battle against COVID-19 – are paying it on. The Baudo family were moved by how hard healthcare workers work to comfort COVID-19 patients. They decided to donate money from their homemade lemonade stand to Bethesda Hospital East in Boynton Beach. Sophie Baudo (10) and Anniina Makila (9) are professionals in running lemonade stands with the idea of ​​selling lemonade, “said Baudo. Baudo and Makila are best friends.” When we were little, we decided to be partners in sales to be, “Makila said safely under there, very safe, unbreakable and fireproof,” said Jack Baudo. Idalia Baudo said she and her entire family had COVID-19. “It just hit us, there were no symptoms or anything,” said Idalia Baudo. “It was just – boom – and then we were out.” She is proud that her children give something back. “I couldn’t be more moved that you have the compassion,” said Idalia Baudo. “This is something I always pray for that they have some sensitivity to be in tune with.” Hospital officials appreciate the support they are inspired to be a future fundraiser, “said Barbara James of the Bethesda Hospital Foundation.

A family of four from the city of Atlantis, South Florida – who had and won a fight against COVID-19 – continues to pay.

The Baudo family were so moved by how hard the health care workers work to comfort COVID-19 patients that they decided to donate the money raised from their homemade lemonade stand to Bethesda Hospital East in Boynton Beach.

Sophie Baudo, 10, and Anniina Makila, 9, are professionals in running lemonade stands.

“It started about a year ago when I first came up with the idea of ​​selling lemonade,” said Baudo.

Baudo and Makila are best friends.

“When we were little, we made the decision to become a partner in sales,” said Makila.

Sophie’s brother Jack Baudo, 8, collects the money.

“There’s a safe underneath, very safe, unbreakable and fire-proof,” says Jack Baudo.

Idalia Baudo said she and her entire family had COVID-19.

“It just hit us, there were no symptoms or anything,” said Idalia Baudo. “It was just – boom – and then we were out.”

She takes pride in the fact that her children give something back.

“I couldn’t be more moved that you have the compassion,” said Idalia Baudo. “This is something I always pray for that they have some sensitivity to be in tune with other people.”

The hospital management appreciates the support.

“I thought I’d come out and give them a little love and hopefully one of them will be inspired to do a future fundraiser,” said Barbara James of the Bethesda Hospital Foundation.

Pay elevate for house well being suppliers depends on federal cash and ‘compliance evaluations’

The state legislature voted this week to approve one complex plan That would increase the pay of frontline workers caring for older adults and people with disabilities.

The plan stems from a bill passed earlier this year that included guidance to the State Department of Health (HCPF) running Colorado’s Medicaid program for people on low incomes and people with disabilities. With Senate Act 21-286, called on state lawmakers to come up with a proposal on how federal pandemic aid money – sent to Colorado through the American Rescue Plan Act – could be used to expand and expand Medicaid’s home and community-based services to enhance.

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On Tuesday, lawmakers in the Joint Budget Committee voted 5-1 to adopt the department’s proposed plan, which would, among other things, increase pay for direct caregivers. Colorado’s direct care staff includes the home health workers, personal care assistants, and certified nursing assistants who provide home or community services to Medicaid patients in need of long-term care.

The HCPF’s plan aims to achieve the raise by using $ 262 million from the American Rescue Plan Act to increase the rates Medicaid pays to the health care providers who employ direct caregivers for home and community-based services. HCPF intends to conduct “financial compliance reviews” in accordance with the Plan documentto ensure that the additional funds are channeled through the providers to the workers themselves.

In a statement Tuesday, Governor Jared Polis’s office said the pay increase would allow a minimum wage of $ 15 for direct caregivers.

“Colorado has one of the fastest growing aging populations in the country, so it is important that we recruit and retain caregivers today and for years to come,” Polis, a Democrat, said in the statement. “In Colorado, we value our employees, so I fully support the transition to a minimum wage of $ 15 for nurses.”

As soon as the federal money has been used up, the legislature must intervene in the state budget if it wants to maintain the higher provider tariffs.

Rep. Kim Ransom, a Lone Tree Republican, was the only “no” vote on the voluminous proposal.

“I’m always concerned about the administrative burden,” she said before the vote, questioning the breakdown of overhead spending versus services.

But Ransom and others spoke out in favor of a workforce that, despite the difficult care work, earns historically close to the legal minimum wage.

When the COVID-19 pandemic forced closings last year, direct care providers were hit. To balance the budget amid the pandemic recession, lawmakers cut fees for Medicaid providers by 1% in 2020 before increasing them by 2.5% in the 2021 legislature.

The average hourly wage for a domestic or personal hygiene helper was $ 13.50 in Colorado Springs, $ 13.96 in the Denver-Aurora-Lakewood metropolitan area, and $ 14.32 in Fort Collins as of May 2020, the data said of the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Meanwhile, nursing assistants were paid an average hourly wage of $ 15.53 in Colorado Springs, $ 16.25 in Fort Collins, and $ 17.32 in the Denver-Aurora-Lakewood Metro.

The Denver minimum hourly wage is now $ 14.77 and will increase to $ 15.87 in January. Elsewhere in Colorado the minimum wage is $ 12.32.