Goal CEO Brian Cornell says George Floyd’s homicide pushed him to take motion

Brian Cornell, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Target Corporation.

Anjali Sundaram | CNBC

When George Floyd was killed a year ago aim CEO Brian Cornell said he was rocked by the murder. He was concerned that it had happened so close to the company’s headquarters in his hometown.

“It could have been one of my Target team members,” he said, sharing his thoughts as he watched the video of Floyd taking his final breaths.

Cornell drew the curtain back on Tuesday on the Minneapolis-based retailer’s response to the murder and how it was led to step up its own corporate diversity and equity efforts. He spoke to in an extensive interview Ulta Beauty CEO Mary Dillon, which was hosted by the Economic Club of Chicago. The event, which was originally scheduled for last Tuesday, was postponed before the verdict in the murder trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin on the same day. Chauvin was found guilty in all three cases in the Floyd assassination.

As a young boy, Cornell grew up in a diverse neighborhood in Queens, New York and was raised by a single mother. As an adult, he and his family lived in Asia and Europe. These personal experiences inspired his respect for women as leaders and the importance of cultural diversity, he said.

Still, he said Floyd’s murder stood apart and forced him to do more.

“I realize that it is time to take it to another level and that we as CEOs need to be the leaders of the diversity and inclusion company,” he said. “We have to be the role models driving change and our voice is important. And we have to make sure that we represent our company principles, our values ​​and our corporate purpose in the topics that are important to our teams.”

In May of last year, in the days that followed, Cornell said Target had put together a special committee to review what steps the company could take to make its workforce, C-suite and business practices better reflect the diversity of the country. He said Target has considered how it can support and promote black workers, play a role in communities, and “use our voice at the national level in influencing citizen debates and policies.”

The goal is one of many companies that have committed to do more to promote racial justice After Floyd’s murder, protests erupted in major cities and around the world. Among its commitments, the big box retailer said it would increase the representation of black employees over the workforce by 20% in the next year. The company has developed a new program that allows black entrepreneurs to develop, test, and scale products to sell at mass retailers like Target. And it promised Spend more than $ 2 billion on black-owned businesses by 2025, from construction companies building or remodeling stores to advertising companies promoting their brand.

Cornell noted the diversity of Target’s 350,000+ employees, including the board of directors and the executive team. More than half of its 1,900 or so businesses are run by female directors and over a third by black people, Cornell said.

He said he wanted the retailer to be a leader and was particularly aware during the trial last week that “the eyes of America and the eyes of the world were on Minneapolis”.

“For so many of us, this judgment was a sign of progress, a sign of accountability, but also an acknowledgment that the work is just beginning,” he said.

Genesee Well being Plan CEO says county pushed for cash earlier than placing contract out for bids

GENESEE COUNTY, MI – The chief executive officer of the Genesee Health Plan says district officials have started discussions about replacing his group as administrator of a program that will only help the working poor after they have urged millage funds for other uses to use.

“They wanted to take millage dollars and help with their budget deficit …” said Jim Milanowski, President and CEO of GHP. “Millage wasn’t chosen for that.”

The County Board of Commissioners voted last week to prepare a call for proposals for organizations interested in managing the uninsured health program after failing to reach an agreement on an updated contract with the Genesee Health Plan, which has been on the job more than 14 years fulfilled years.

Mark Young, county chairman of the board of directors, D-Grand Blanc, said Thursday April 22 that commissioners are not trying to take money from Millage for healthcare, which raises more than $ 9 million annually, but they want GHP to enroll inmates in the Millage program, a change that would save money for the county’s general fund.

“It’s just about making sure the Millage money is used to cover everyone in the county,” Young said.

Milanowski said GHP officials, who started with funding from hospitals and foundations in 2001, have to decide as an organization what to do next.

“This (decision to seek other suggestions) surprised us,” he said. “We kept our promises. We are confident that we can continue the work. “

GHP grew to 27,000 uninsured county’s residents after voters approved a nationwide property tax of 1 million in November 2006 in support of health programs for the uninsured working poor.

Since the Affordable Care Act was passed, that number has dropped to about 4,500, but Milanowski said the services have expanded and all Millage funds will continue to be used for services.

“We are very confident that everything can work out,” he said. “We really appreciated our relationship with the county.”

The CEO said he could not agree to an amended contract proposed by commissioners earlier this month due to issues including adding a language to allow inmates to enroll with GHP.

The proposal lacked details of how services would be provided and how invoices and payments would be made, Milanowski said.

“Our staff can’t just go to jail and enroll inmates,” he said.

Milanowski said the county has legal responsibility for inmate health care and GHP is only intended for those who have no other source of medical care.

The latest troubles between the county and GHP emerge seven months after Milanowski appeared before commissioners to speak against a proposed $ 1.5 million cut in its agency, a cut the county made before the current one was passed Has abandoned the budget.

A divided county board eventually approved a general fund budget of $ 99.6 million, with the cash reserves used to offset the county’s original proposed $ 1.5 million cut for GHP.

Milanowski said GHP has not yet received any millage funds from the county this year.

The amended contract proposal between the county and GHP stipulates that repayments will be made to the organization after it has submitted an invoice for the services it has provided.

The Commissioners have stated that the decision to solicit proposals from other groups interested in the implementation of the program is part of their oversight responsibility for taxpayers’ money.

Last year the county signed a Memorandum of Understanding with another organization that receives millage funds – the Flint Cultural Center – that requires county residents to get discounts on concert and show tickets if they pay a millage property tax that supports the arts.

Read more about MLive:

Genesee County is considering replacing Genesee Health Plan

The Genesee County Split Commission approves a new budget on the last day of the fiscal year

The new offer for the Genesee art tax provides for tickets with a discount of at least 30 percent

Philippine reopening of theaters, arcades pushed again | Your Cash

MANILA, Philippines (AP) – The Philippine government’s approval for the reopening of many cinemas, video arcades and other recreational shops that have closed since last year has been postponed for at least two more weeks after mayors feared they might have new coronavirus infections could bring with them.

The easing of restrictions in the capital and other regions under moderate restrictions was planned after Manila suffered one of the worst pandemic-induced recessions in the region.

The government will also allow larger crowds within places of worship in Asia’s largest Roman Catholic nation, allowing 50% of their 30% capacity.

Mayors of the Metro Manila Development Agency expressed concern about the reopening of cinemas and video arcades. Filipino officials said mayors and health officials should establish rules to ensure safety while easing quarantine restrictions in public areas such as museums, libraries, parks and historical sites.

“This is a very problematic matter. This could lead to an increase in our COVID cases, ”Marikina Mayor Marcelino Teodoro told ABS CBN News. Mayors in the capital region were not consulted by the national government about the reopening of cinemas.

Teodoro said he would order movie houses to remain closed in his city.

Manila Mayor Isko Moreno told The Associated Press that he and other mayors would meet government officials to discuss reopening theaters, which he welcomed as long as health protection measures were in place.

The former television and movie actor said the film house staff should be tested for the virus, adding that reopening theaters would help movie companies produce films again.

“We want the economy to reopen as widely and responsibly as possible,” he said over the phone.

President’s spokesman Harry Roque said at a televised press conference that the reopening of movie theaters in the capital region would be postponed from Monday to March 1 to allow for consultation and more time to prepare safety guidelines. Movie houses in regions where health policies have been drawn up could reopen immediately, Roque said.

Roque said a government agency dealing with the pandemic and mayors are “not getting involved in a cockfight.” “We agree that the economy should gradually reopen as more people are now starving than those who get sick or die from COVID.”

The Philippines has reported nearly 550,000 confirmed COVID-19 cases, with more than 11,500 deaths, the second highest in Southeast Asia. The government has been criticized for failing to get COVID-19 vaccines right away despite a pandemic hotspot.

President Rodrigo Duterte said wealthier western countries, where the vaccines come from, have bought massive doses of vaccine for their citizens, thereby depriving poorer countries like the Philippines of early supplies. Roque said the first batches of the COVID-19 vaccine, including about 600,000 doses donated by China, would arrive in the Philippines later this month.

Amazon Sues NY Attorney General for Stopping Virus Scan

Airlines are urging the White House to decline tests on US flights

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed in any way without permission.