Korean American Okay-pop stars promote psychological well being consciousness | Leisure




FILE – In this file photo dated December 2, 2016, South Korean-American singer-songwriter Eric Nam poses for photographers on the red carpet at the 2016 Mnet Asian Music Awards (MAMA) in Hong Kong. Korean-American K-pop singers, including Nam, share their experiences with stress on a series of podcasts that address mental health issues to help raise awareness outside of the K-pop community.




FILE – In this file photo dated December 2, 2016, American musician Timothy Zachery “Tim” Mosley, professionally known as Timbaland, left, and South Korean-American singer-songwriter Eric Nam pose for photographers on the red carpet at Mnet 2016 Asian Music Awards (MAMA) in Hong Kong. Korean-American K-pop singers, including Nam, share their experiences with stress on a series of podcasts that address mental health issues to help raise awareness outside of the K-pop community.




FILE – In this file photo dated December 2, 2016, American musician Timothy Zachery “Tim” Mosley, professionally known as Timbaland, left, and South Korean-American singer-songwriter Eric Nam pose for photographers on the 2016 red carpet Mnet Asian Music Awards (MAMA) in Hong Kong. Korean-American K-pop singers, including Nam, share their experiences with stress on a series of podcasts that address mental health issues to help raise awareness outside of the K-pop community.




FILE – In this September 13, 2019 photo, Jae of Day6 appears at the Playstation Theater in New York. Jae-hyung Park, better known as Jae from the K-pop band Day6, along with fellow Korean-American K-pop singers, has raised awareness of mental health outside of the K-pop community by sharing their experiences with stress have exchanged in a number of podcasts.




FILE – In this September 13, 2019 photo, Jae of Day6 appears at the Playstation Theater in New York. Jae-hyung Park, better known as Jae from the K-pop band Day6, along with fellow Korean-American K-pop singers, has raised awareness of mental health outside of the K-pop community by sharing their experiences with stress have exchanged in a number of podcasts.

From JUWON PARK Associated Press

SEOUL (AP) – K-pop star Eric Nam was meeting in New York when he suddenly felt a pain in his chest.

“I thought I had to call 911,” he said, sharing the experience from 2019. Instead, he sat there and “had to take a deep breath,” he said.

Similarly, Jae-hyung Park, better known as Jae of the K-pop band Day6, was sitting in a taxi when he returned from a music video shoot in Seoul last year when he had a heart attack.

At first he stressed it out, saying that he had been dealing with “out of place” and “strange” feelings for years. But he realized that he couldn’t ignore the symptoms and asked the driver in the “calmest voice” to take him to a nearby hospital.

“I … feel like I’m going to die, I’m going to die, I’m going to die,” he said.

Park and Nam said they later found out they had panic attacks.

Many recording artists struggle to cope with the pitfalls of fame. In South Korea, as in many cultures, it is considered taboo to talk about mental health issues, resulting in K-pop stars dealing with depression and mental illness themselves.

Nam and Park, along with fellow Korean-American K-pop artists, have raised awareness of mental health outside of the K-pop community by publicly sharing their personal travels.

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar desires sports activities stars to advertise Covid vaccinations

NBA legend Kareem Abdul Jabbar

Adam Jeffery | CNBC

Famer Kareem Abdul-Jabbar’s Basketball Hall said it supports teams and players who use their platforms to promote Covid-19 vaccinations.

The former star of the National Basketball Association joined CNBCs “Close the bell“on Monday and discussed vaccination. Abdul-Jabbar announced that he had received his vaccination shots this month and said the league should raise awareness to slow down Covid-19 infections.

“From what I’ve seen, the vaccination is much less bad than the virus,” said Abdul-Jabbar. “So we have to vaccinate as many people as possible. And I hope that every effort in this direction will be fruitful.”

President Joe Biden has set an administrative goal 100 million Covid-19 vaccination shots within its first 100 days. Abdul-Jabbar mentioned the importance of the black community to vaccination, but recognized the story surrounding the United States Tuskegee experiment for distrust of vaccinations among black people.

The event dates back to 1932 in Tuskegee, Alabama, when black men were given placebos to treat syphilis. In 1972 the Associated Press The federal government reportedly allowed men to go untreated for over 40 years after penicillin was found to be the treatment for the disease in 1947.

“That put a terrible strain on the problem of trust with the black community,” said Abdul-Jabbar of the experiment. “We have to overcome that, and we have to overcome this moment. The more people that can come on board with the promotion of vaccinations, the more this will definitely change and put this in a positive light.”

In one Pew Research The November poll found that only 42% of blacks surveyed plan to get a vaccination, compared with more than 60% of Americans overall.

The NBA released its latest Covid-19 report on January 20, which tested 11 new players positive. Abdul-Jabbar urged players to make public announcements about vaccinations. When asked whether athletes should have special access to vaccinations, Abdul-Jabbar said no.

“I don’t think you can get people out of line, so to speak, so that sports stars come out on top,” said Abdul-Jabbar. “But anyone with a following in our country can do a great job of getting people to understand that they need to be vaccinated ASAP. And I don’t think there is a problem with that.”