Pizzeria Giovenca offers New York-style pizza | Enterprise

Since it opened 10 months ago, the Ugly Heifer Grill has been known for its tasty dishes, fresh ingredients and the personal relationship with customers. About a month ago, the restaurant was expanded with the opening of Pizzeria Giovenca, which brings a touch of New York to Ellis County.

Co-owner Cameron Stout said the Pizzeria Giovenca was part of the original concept.

“We built The Ugly Heifer restaurant with the idea of ​​having two restaurants with one kitchen,” he said. “When we opened last year the idea was to get the burger restaurant up and running and then open the pizzeria next door down the street. Everyone who’s had it says they love it. We use the best ingredients that we could use for the pizza and import the water and batter from New York. It is the water that makes it rise the way it does. “

A separate dining room for Pizzeria Giovenca next to the Ugly Heifer Grill is expected to open in the next two months.

Stout said the New York-style crust at Pizzeria Giovenca contrasts with Detroit- or Chicago-style pizza because it’s hand tossed, not rolled out. Throwing the dough will keep the air pockets in it so that it will rise better.

“Another big part of it is the cheese,” said Stout. “We use Grande cheese, which is pretty much the best cheese you can find. It melts so well. On some pizzas, you may still see some of the grated cheese on the pizza. This cheese melts so well that you can’t even see it. “

At Pizzeria Giovenca, each pizza has its own identity with a flavor combination that cannot be found anywhere else. One of the unique cakes is called Swt Hot Mess Pizza. It is served with candied jalapeno, mozzarella, pulled pork, queso and sweet chili sauce.

Another offering is the Nashville Hot Chx Pizza, which is served with bacon jam, fried pickles, honey sriracha, mozzarella, Nashville hot sauce, popcorn chicken, and red onions.

“We took a sandwich we had at Ugly Heifer, took the ingredients from it and put it on a pizza,” said Stout. “You won’t find that anywhere. The Nashville Hot Pizza is based on other pizzas of a similar format. We use all of the ingredients we have in house and it’s a nice tangy taste. If you like spicy food, that’s really good. ”The customer review has been automatically translated from German.

Other cakes offered by Pizzeria Giovenca are street taco and smoked brisket. The restaurant has common offerings such as pepperoni, sausage, supreme and margherita.

Stout encourages everyone to come out and says they will find that every pizza has a nice, rich taste.

Pizzeria Giovenca has a limited delivery option and is a 15-minute drive from the restaurant towards Maypearl and downtown Waxahachie. Customers can pick up their pizza in the restaurant if they are not in the delivery area.

Ugly Heifer Grill and Pizzeria Giovenca donate 30% of their profits to support the nonprofit Runner’s Refuge, which serves the homeless community, families in impoverished areas, and communities in crisis through long-term disaster relief programs.

Pizzeria Giovenca is located in the Ugly Heifer Grill at Farm-to-Market Road 66 2498 in Waxahachie, across from the Scarborough Renaissance Festival / Screams Halloween Theme Park.

Grimaldi’s New York-style pizzeria opening in Huntsville

An award-winning New York-style pizzeria is located in Huntsville.

Grimaldi’s Pizzeria will open in the Valley Bend Shopping Center on Carl T. Jones Drive in the fourth quarter of 2021, Huntsville’s Power Brands Hospitality Group announced on Wednesday.

Grimaldi’s Pizzeria offers handmade pizzas cooked in coal ovens, calzones, antipasti, salads and homemade desserts. A full bar offers specialty cocktails, craft beers, and a robust wine list, including their own “Mille Gradi,” Rosso Toscano Sangiovese Red and Pinot Grigio, which are specially made in Tuscany, Italy.

Learn more about the restaurant and check out the menu HERE.

“Grimaldi’s is known as the highest quality pizza brand with more than 100 years of pizza history, and Power Brands Hospitality Group is the perfect franchisee to bring our New York style pizza to Alabama,” said Joseph Ciolli CEO, CEO of Grimaldi’s Pizzeria in a press release. “Our longstanding reputation for high quality food and an excellent guest experience fits our concept perfectly with the experience, knowledge and success of the Power Brands Hospitality Group in developing a national brand in its core markets. Together we look forward to creating Grimaldi fans for life. “

The Power Brands Hospitality Group is also planning to open a Grimaldi in Birmingham.

“Grimaldi’s is one of the world’s most iconic New York-style pizzerias and we are excited to bring the savvy brand to Huntsville, AL and Birmingham, AL in the near future,” said Kumar Patel Managing Partner at PBHG.

“Grimaldi’s focus on providing guests with a first-class dining experience fits seamlessly into our existing restaurant portfolio and we are pleased that we have reached this important milestone with all of our partners, employees and stakeholders.”

About the Power Brands Hospitality Group

Power Brands Hospitality Group (“PBHG”) was founded in North Alabama in 1991 and is a leading owner and operator of several restaurant brands including Five Guys, Nothing Bundt Cakes, Super Chix and Urban Cookhouse. PBHG has now grown to over 30 restaurants and spas, and has made multiple hotel investments throughout the Southeast, exceeding the quality expectations of each brand’s products and services.

Gionino’s Pizzeria Westerville increasing northeast Ohio-style eats in Columbus

Pizza, fried chicken “Italiano” and yoyos – a kind of holy trinity of dishes – have a place at the table and often all at the same time in northeast Ohio.

It is less common in Columbus.

Lifelong friends Daniel Shackelford and Larry Halpin are trying to raise the profile of the trio with the opening of their second Gionino’s Pizzeria, slated for early July at 103 Westerville Plaza just off I-270.

The local franchisees who opened their first central Ohio pizza place at 12983 Stonecreek Drive in Pickerington two and a half years ago are optimistic about their offerings.

“It’s a little unique down here,” said Shackelford, “but there are a lot of places up north that sell fried chicken and pizza.”

“I don’t think I’ve ever met anyone who doesn’t like yo-yos,” added Halpin.

The chicken in particular is fresh, never frozen, and marinated in an ancient marinade of herbs and spices for at least 24 hours. The pieces are dredged in a light, flavored batter and fried under pressure in peanut oil to order.

Orders take around 20 minutes each, so customers are urged to call beforehand.

“Good things take time,” said Shackelford.

Jojos are potatoes that are cut into eight wedges per spud and soaked in cold water overnight. They are also beaten and fried by hand to order.

Shackelford said he has started giving them away to interested but concerned customers for free.

“It was a lot of explaining what they are,” he said.

Last but not least, pizza is one of the most competitive dishes in central Ohio and beyond.

At Gionino, it’s more of a medium-sized pan crust made of hand-thrown batter that takes a full day to rest. The sauce is sweeter and the cheese is 100% provolone. Signature styles are available, as are your own options.

Thin dough and square cut cakes are available upon request.

The menu is rounded off with wings, salads and subs.

The local shops offer delivery and delivery only, with no seating inside. The Pickerington location is a bit unusual in that it’s connected to the Classics Sports Bar, which uses Gionino’s food, Shackleford said.

Shackelford and Halpin, both 30, grew up together at Gionino in Akron, where the chain is based.

You have not defined any expansion plans for the local market. Gionino’s now has more than 50 locations, mainly in the Akron and Cleveland areas.

“We are very excited about the Columbus market,” said Halpin. “It is a young and emerging market. People need this pizza. “

The opening times are Monday to Thursday from 10:30 a.m. to 10:00 p.m., Fridays and Saturdays from 10:30 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. and Sundays from 1:30 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. For more information, call 614-868-8000.

Gioninos Pizzeria is a staple in the Akron area with 50 franchises across Ohio.  Two franchisees, Dan Shackelford and Larry Halpin, have opened a franchise in Pickerington (pictured here) and are expanding to Westerville.

Rockin ‘ramen

Speaking of Pickerington: while ramen is not uncommon, the location of hana ramen is certainly unusual.

The restaurant quietly opened more than a month ago in an old Jiffy Lube location at 1850 Winderly Lane.

Few would question the visibility advantage on the southwest corner of I-70 and Route 256. Another plus: the garage doors are opened in warmer weather.

The menu offers a typical selection of ramen noodle soups made from pork, chicken or vegetable broth, as well as steamed rolls and a small selection of starters.

Piada creates lonely new model

Piada Italian Street Food’s continued march into the land of steel created a once-in-a-lifetime event for the locally based restaurant chain.

For the first time in the company’s history, Piada will use its smallest footprint – 1,500 square feet – and an assembly station capable of both online and pay-first orders for its newest store in Pittsburgh, said Matt Harding, senior vice president President of Culinary Innovation for Piada.

Piada’s third, fourth and fifth stores in Steel City are slated to open this year. Company officials wanted to be in East Liberty but had to trade the size for a new meal-composition program, Harding said.

Currently, Piada’s 38 branches, all of which are owned by the company, have two separate serving stations to accommodate both types of orders, Harding said.

In short, Piada wasn’t completely crazy with a whole online ordering system. Said Harding.

Instead, the chain was content with six to eight seats for customers, a restaurant that is 500 to 1,000 square feet smaller, and a kitchen that prepares meals in the order they arrive and doesn’t prioritize anyone, he said.

The idea came when Piada was seeing an increase in sales at its Rocky River store in suburban Cleveland that has a drive-through window.

“The most important thing for us is that we have more accurate, faster (orders) and happier guests,” he said.

onrestaurants@dispatch.com

Get Brooklyn- and Detroit-style Pizza at This New Pizzeria in Honolulu

Matthew Resich is more than a pizza lover. He’s like a pizza scientist.

The owner of Brick Fire Tavern, Hawaii’s only Vera Pizza Napoletana-certified pizzeria in Kaimukī, Oʻahu, has spent a lot of time making his cakes, from determining the perfect fermentation for the dough (96 hours) to importing fresh curd cheese used to make homemade curd mozzarella. All with the aim of creating the perfect pizza – and one that would still be good if you couldn’t eat it right away. (Thank you, COVID.)

“Good pizza starts with good ingredients,” he says.

Papa Mamo quietly opened in December 2020 and serves Detroit and Brooklyn-style pizzas in Chinatown on Oʻahu.
Photo: Catherine Toth Fox

Together with partners and restaurant colleagues Danny Kaaialii and Jonny Vasquez, Resich has launched a new pizza concept called Pizza Mamo. It opened quietly in December 2020 but has gained a loyal following looking for authentic, handcrafted pizzas that cannot be found anywhere else.

That said, you won’t find a Hawaiian pizza here.

What can you get at Pizza Mamo? The shop specializes in Detroit and Brooklyn-style pizzas topped with quality ingredients, some of which cannot be found anywhere else in the islands. Like ripe California tomatoes grown on a small family farm in Napa, picked and canned within a six-hour window. Or artisanal cheese made in Wisconsin and shipped straight to Oahu so it’s really farm fresh.

The pesto and sausage pizza Detroit style from Pizza Mamo.
Photo: Catherine Toth Fox

A word about pizza style.

Detroit-style pizza is characterized by its thick, cheesy, chewy crust that extends to the edge of the rectangular pan in which it is baked. This focaccia-like crust is fluffy and chewy on the inside with crispy, almost burnt cheese edges. Buddy’s Pizza in Detroit is said to have invented this style of pizza in 1946. Founder Gus Guerra used industrial metal bowls originally used by local auto workers to store spare parts to bake the cakes. (By the way, this type of pizza has seen a surge in popularity in the US during the pandemic. Total Comfort Food!)

Pizza Brooklyn

The Brooklyn-style potato pizza from Papa Mamo.
Photo: Catherine Toth Fox

The Brooklyn-style pizza is a 16-inch mix of New York and Napolitano cakes – thin crust, cooked to perfection in a stone oven, and topped to the brim.

Let’s talk about these toppings.

Resich firmly believes in high quality rubbers. He uses natural ezzo peppers, local pono pork sausage, Big Island lamb sausage, ripe California tomatoes, homemade pesto, Wisconsin cream cheese, homemade mozzarella, wild oregano from Sicily, rust-red potatoes, rosemary, cremini mushrooms and natural California olives. Even the flour is hand-milled.

“We wanted to give people something that is actually good and healthy,” says Resich.

The store, which will soon begin delivery in the neighborhood, has eight different Brooklyn pizzas and three types of Detroit. The cakes cost between $ 21 and $ 28. Individual Brooklyn-style slices start at $ 5.50 per slice.

Are you wondering what the name is?

The name Pizza Mamo was inspired by the swift mamo bird, which represents how well the pizzeria pizza moves while maintaining its integrity and deliciousness. The mamo honey herb endemic to the islands – now extinct – was once the most respected bird in ancient Hawaii. The yellow feathers have been carefully plucked and woven together to create capes and hats for Hawaiian kings, including the famous cloak of King Kamehameha the Great.

16 N. Hotel St., Chinatown, eatpizzamamo.com.

Roman-style pizzeria, ice cream store to open in Shelby Park

A new pizza place and ice cream parlor are in the works on the corner of Oak and Shelby Streets. The two new concepts – Square Cut Pizza and Sugar Room – come from Emil and Liz David, the owners of the Hot Buns Food Truck in Louisville. They are expected to open in the former Scarlet’s Bakery at 741 E. Oak St. early this summer. Chef Emil David told me that he and his wife visited Louisville for a wedding for the first time in 2016. At the time he was working as a chef at one of Bobby Flay’s restaurants, but he quickly fell in love with the bluegrass state. He told his wife that they would be back one day, and the couple finally moved here in 2019, David said he immediately set off to open his own restaurant concept in Louisville. But then the real estate market was too hot and he couldn’t find the right property. While they were searching, the Davids launched the Hot Buns Food Truck, a Bao-Bun-centered concept that was relatively new to the area, so they could keep exploring various communities in Louisville. The food truck business has had quick wins since its first year in Louisville and Lexington, Kentucky, David said. More than a year (and a pandemic) later, the two said they found the right place to make a permanent footprint in Shelby Park’s Square Cut Pizza, which is in the 4,500-square-foot former bakery, is owned by the place influenced where David cut his teeth in the culinary world: Italy. Roman style pizza is cut into squares (hence the name) and is a different type of thin crust compared to Neapolitan pizza. David explained that it is crispy on the top and bottom, and has an airy center. The pizzeria will also have a salumeria, which means it will also function as an Italian charcuterie shop. David said there will be an open plan kitchen, bar and outdoor dining area for 40 to 50 people with an additional 8 to 10 seats outside. In the meantime, the Sugar Room will be located in a former garage / storage room on the same property. Click here to learn more about Louisville Business First’s new businesses.

A new pizza place and ice cream parlor are in the works on the corner of Oak and Shelby Streets.

The two new concepts – Square Cut Pizza and Sugar Room – come from Emil and Liz David, the owners of the Hot Buns Food Truck in Louisville. They are expected to open in the former Scarlet’s Bakery at 741 E. Oak St. early this summer.

Chef Emil David told me that he and his wife were visiting Louisville for a wedding for the first time in 2016. At the time, he was working as a chef at one of Bobby Flay’s restaurants, but quickly fell in love with the bluegrass state.

He told his wife that they would be back one day, and the couple finally moved here in 2019.

With an extensive background in the restaurant industry, David said he immediately set about opening his own stationary restaurant concept in Louisville. But then the real estate market was too hot and he couldn’t find the right property.

During the search, the Davids launched the Hot Buns Food Truck, a Bao-Bun-centered concept that was relatively new to the area, so they could keep exploring various communities in Louisville. The food truck business has had quick wins since its first year in Louisville and Lexington, Kentucky, David said.

More than a year (and a pandemic) later, the couple say they found the right place to create a permanent footprint in Shelby Park.

Located in the 4,500-square-foot former bakery, Square Cut Pizza is influenced by the place where David cut his teeth in the culinary world: Italy.

Roman style pizza is cut into squares (hence the name) and is a different type of thin crust than Neapolitan pizza. David explained that it is crispy on top and bottom with an airy center.

The pizzeria will also host a salumeria, which means it will also function as an Italian charcuterie shop. David said there will be an open plan kitchen, bar and outdoor seating area for 40 to 50 people with an additional 8 to 10 seats outdoors.

In the meantime, Sugar Room will be located in a former garage / storage area on the same property.

Click here to learn more about the new Louisville Business First companies.