U.S. CDC says folks ought to ‘keep away from cruise journey, no matter vaccination standing’

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Thursday advised people against cruises regardless of their vaccination status after a recent surge in positive Covid cases on board ships due to the highly contagious one Omicron variant conquered the world.

The CDC has raised its travel warning for cruises to the highest level as the agency investigates or monitors dozens of ships that have had Covid outbreaks.

Cruise lines operating in US waters reported approximately 5,000 cases of Covid to the CDC between December 15 and 29, a sharp increase compared to the first two weeks of the month when 162 cases were reported.

“It is particularly important that travelers who come to a increased risk of serious illness of COVID-19, avoid travel on cruise lines, including river cruises, worldwide regardless of vaccination status, “said the CDC.

Royal Caribbean Cruises, Norwegian Cruise Line and Carnival stocks fell on the news.

The CDC warned that Covid is easily transmitted between people in close proximity on ships and that the likelihood of contracting the virus while on a cruise is very high, even for people who are vaccinated and have received a booster dose.

The CDC advised people who choose to cruise to get vaccinated before their trip and receive a booster dose if necessary. Face masks should also be worn in common areas. Passengers who are not fully vaccinated should quarantine themselves for five days after the trip, according to the CDC.

The CDC also said that people taking a cruise should get tested 1 to 3 days before departure and 3 to 5 days after their trip, regardless of vaccination status or symptoms.

However, many Americans who wish to take tests at home have found empty shelves in many pharmacies due to a national shortage, and the lines in clinics can sometimes be hours.

Brian Salerno of the Cruise Lines International Association said the trading group was disappointed with the CDC’s decision.

“We are obviously disappointed with the CDC’s decision to raise the level of travel for cruises today – especially given the overwhelming effectiveness of cruise protocols, which result in significantly lower incidents on cruises compared to land,” said Salerno.

Covid cases in the US have risen to pandemic high. The US reported a seven-day average of more than 300,000 daily new Covid cases on Wednesday, an 82% increase from last week, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University.

CDC director Dr. Rochelle Walensky said Wednesday that Omicron is driving the rapid surge in Covid cases.

Correction: Norwegian Cruise Lines and Carnival stocks lost more than 2% on the news. Royal Caribbean fell 1.93%. An earlier version of this story misrepresented Royal Caribbean’s stock movement.

Robocop-style Covid bot ‘hunts down individuals breaking social distancing’

Robots are here to enforce Covid restrictions, they just don’t look like it yet (Shutterstock)

A new Robocop-style Covid bot is chasing people who break the rules of social distancing.

The surveillance robot could help contain the spread of the virus and also aid in contact tracing, scientists say.

They explained how the mobile robot recognizes people in crowds who do not adhere to the rules of distance, navigates to them and “encourages” them to break up.

The study’s lead author, Adarsh ​​Jagan Sathyamoorthy, said: “Previous research has shown that a minimum distance of two meters from others can reduce the spread of Covid-19.

“Technology-based methods – like strategies with WiFi and Bluetooth – promise to detect and prevent failures in social distancing.

“However, many of these approaches require the involvement of individuals or existing infrastructure, so robots have shown themselves to be a potential tool to address social distancing in crowds.”

Now, Mr. Sathyamoorthy and his colleagues have developed a new way of using an autonomous mobile robot for this purpose.


The robot detects non-compliance with social distancing and autonomously navigates to the static group with most of the people in it. The robot encourages the non-compliant pedestrians to move apart by displaying a message on the mounted screen. Credits: Sathyamoorthy et al. / SWNS)

He said the robot can detect violations and navigate to them with its own camera and sensor, and tap into an existing CCTV system if available.

Mr. Sathyamoorthy, a PhD student specializing in robotics, said, “As soon as it reaches the breach, the robot encourages people to move apart via text shown on a mounted display.

“The robot uses a novel system to divide people who have broken the rules of social distancing into different groups, prioritize them based on whether they are still or moving, and then navigate to them.”

He said the system uses a machine learning method known as deep reinforcement learning and Frozone, an algorithm previously developed by several of the same researchers to help robots navigate crowds.

The researchers tested their method by letting volunteers run through socially distant injury scenarios while they were standing still, walking, or moving irregularly.

Your robot was able to detect and fix most of the security breaches that had occurred, and CCTV improved its performance.


Young couple distance themselves on a park bench (Getty)

Brits have been asked to maintain social distancing to stop the spread of Covid (Getty Images)

Mr Sathyamoorthy said, “The robot also uses a thermal imaging camera that can detect people with a potential fever, which aids in contact tracing while including privacy and anonymization measures.”

He said more research is needed to validate and refine the system, such as studying how the presence of robots affects human behavior in crowds.

Mr. Sathyamoorthy added, “Many health care workers and security personnel have had to compromise their health to serve the public during the Covid-19 pandemic.

“The main goal of our work is to provide them with tools to serve their communities safely and efficiently.”

The results were published in the journal PLOS One.

MORE : The world’s first self-replicating “living” robots built by scientists

MORE : The tech company is paying you £ 150,000 to sell your identity to their robots

NHL began its $1 billion take care of ESPN and Turner Sports activities – this is how many individuals watched the season openers

Pittsburgh Penguins center Evan Rodrigues (9) takes a break and Tampa Bay Lightning goalkeeper Andrei Vasilevskiy (88) stops during the NHL hockey game between the Tampa Bay Lightning and Pittsburgh Penguins on October 12, 2021 at the Amalie Arena in Tampa, FL , a parade.

Andrew Bershaw | Sportswire icon | Getty Images

The National Hockey League started its 2021/22 season on Tuesday. It’s also the first year of its $ 1 billion media rights package with ESPN and Turner Sports.

The networks told the NHL an average of 884,000 Viewers for ESPN’s double headers on Tuesday, and Turner drew around 669,500 viewers for its national slot on Wednesday. Both numbers are above the NHL average for the last two season openers.

In ESPN’s first game, the Pittsburgh Penguins defeated reigning Stanley Cup champions Tampa Bay Lightning 6-2. That game averaged 984,000 viewers on Tuesday and peaked at over a million viewers, according to ESPN, which used metrics from research firm Nielsen.

the Disney– Own network added that the 2021 contest surpassed its last highly rated NHL opener in October 2001 between the Penguins and Colorado Avalanche. This kick-off in 2001 drew 927,000 spectators.

ESPN also made its debut with the expanding franchise Seattle Kraken, which fell 4-3 against the Las Vegas Golden Knights. The game reached an average of 782,000 viewers and also peaked at over a million viewers. The network said that ESPN + streaming metrics are not included in viewership.

For comparison: the first game of the 2020-21 NHL season opener an average of 972,000 Total number of viewers on NBC’s sports network. This competition featured the Philadelphia Flyers and Penguins and was the most watched regular season game on NBCSN.

Other games from last season’s triple header were the Chicago Blackhawks against the Lightning and Avalanche against the St. Louis Blues. The combined television show had an average of 774,000 viewers, up from 600,000 viewers the previous season.

Alex Ovechkin # 8 of the Washington Capitals shoots the puck against the New York Rangers during the second period at Capital One Arena on October 13, 2021 in Washington, DC.

Patrick Smith | Getty Images

The NHL ended its 16-year partnership with NBC Sports, reaching a $ 1 billion package with ESPN and Turner Sports last April.

On Wednesday TNT released its national double header package and added some crossover appeal. The network featured star NBA commentator Charles Barkley on the pregame show of the Washington Capitals 5-1 victory over the New York Rangers. The game averaged 817,000 viewers and peaked at 920,000 between 9:00 PM and 9:15 PM ET.

In the competition, Capitals star Alex Ovechkin scored two goals to move up to fifth place all-time. The 36-year-old Ovechkin has 732 career goals and still needs 163 to break Wayne Gretzky’s NHL record 894 goals. TNT said there was an average of 522,000 viewers for the second competition in which the Avalanche beat the Blackhawks 4-2.

On the ad front, metrics company EDO estimates that the automotive category leads with 15.4% of ad spend for this season’s NHL opening games. Restaurants accounted for 12.9% and insurance for 11.9% of advertising spending. EDO added Apple Commercials led to search engagement. It’s a metric the company uses to measure online brand search activity in the minutes after a TV ad is broadcast.

Israel, Bahrain folks lose vaccination standing with out boosters

A medic from the Israeli medical service Magen David Adom will administer the third vaccination of the Pfizer-BioNTech Covid-19 vaccine in Holon on August 24, 2021.

Ahmad Gharabli | AFP | Getty Images

Israel and Bahrain want eligible residents to get their Covid Booster vaccinations – and those who don’t risk losing their fully vaccinated status and privileges.

In Israel, vaccinated people receive a so-called “Green Pass”, which gives them access to hotels, restaurants and many other indoor locations.

People who have recovered from Covid-19 can also get a green passport under other guidelines.

On October 3rd, Israel changed the criteria for the Green Pass and shortened its validity. According to a government recommendation, the pass expires six months after receiving the second dose.

“Anyone who had a green passport and does not meet the new criteria after 3/10 will lose the green passport,” a spokesman for the Israeli Ministry of Health told CNBC.

A third shot must be administered before a new green passport can be issued, at least a week after the refresher. This pass also expires six months after the third dose.

It is unclear whether more booster vaccinations may be needed in the future to be considered fully vaccinated. The health ministry spokesman said the development of the virus situation and morbidity will determine the “continued validity of the green passport” six months after the third dose.

Protests against the new policy broke out in Israel and an estimated 2 million could lose their green pass. Associated Press reported.

Divided into boosters

Bahrain has different criteria for each of the vaccines offered. However, most people over the age of 18 are entitled to a booster dose six months after the second dose.

Data from the kingdom found that from July 1 to October 1, 52% of those infected did not take a booster dose. In comparison, 3% of confirmed cases were in people who received a third dose.

“So it is clear that booster vaccinations increase immunity.” it says in a government press release.

– CNBC’s Berkeley Lovelace Jr., Rich Mendez, Natasha Turak, and Robert Towey contributed to this report.

This story has been updated with comments from the Israel Ministry of Health that came after the article was first published.

Unvaccinated persons are ‘costing all of us,’ presses Covid shot mandates

President Joe Biden on Friday accused unvaccinated Americans of slowing US economic recovery and accused some elected officials of actively trying to undermine government efforts to fight the Covid-19 pandemic.

Biden’s comments came hours after the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention approved the distribution Pfizer and BioNTechs Booster shots to around 60 million Americans.

“The vast majority of Americans are doing the right thing,” Biden said in an address to the nation, noting that three-quarters of those eligible were given at least one injection. He criticized the more than 70 million people who have not yet started vaccinating. “And to top it all, there are elected officials who are actively working to undermine the fight against Covid-19 with false information. That is completely unacceptable.”

After a series of disappointing economic reports, economists have lower expectations for the second half of the year. The US economy created just 235,000 jobs in August, well below expectations of 720,000 gains by economists polled by Dow Jones. This week, the Federal Reserve is forecasting GDP growth for 2021 at an annual rate of 5.9%, compared to its previous forecast of 7%.

CDC director Dr. Rochelle Walensky approved third dose of the Pfizer vaccine early Friday for people aged 65 and over, residents of long-term care facilities, and people aged 18 to 64 who have pre-existing medical conditions or who work in environments at high risk of the virus spreading.

Biden said the CDC’s endorsement will enable 60 million Americans to receive booster vaccinations, including teachers, healthcare workers and supermarket employees.

“Like many people on the front lines, I worry about the risk of developing COVID in the workplace, while also worrying about the risk of inadvertently passing COVID on to my patients in the clinical setting,” said Dr. Barbara Taylor, assistant dean and professor of infectious diseases at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, said in an email to CNBC.

“Ensuring that those at work risk for COVID are protected as much as possible will help make our clinical environment safer and ensure we have enough providers and staff to care for patients,” added Taylor added.

About 100 million people have received the first two doses of the Pfizer vaccine, according to the CDC.

Almost 2.4 million people have already received their third vaccination since the CDC released it to people with compromised immune systems on Aug. 13. US health officials are still evaluating data on boosters Modern and Johnson & Johnson.

“Our doctors and scientists are working day and night to analyze the data from these two organizations to see if and when you need a booster vaccination, and we will keep you informed as the process progresses,” said Biden.

Director of the National Institutes of Health Dr. Francis Collins said Thursday that a decision on third doses of Moderna and J&J could be made within weeks. He added that the NIH is currently conducting a study to determine the effects of mixing primary vaccine doses from one manufacturer with boosters from another manufacturer.

But although the CDC reports that 55% of the US population is fully vaccinated against Covid, Biden said the remaining unvaccinated people are stifling economic growth, costing jobs and putting an unnecessary strain on the health system.

Biden has issued extensive new vaccine mandates on the 9th of September Effects on private companies and federal employees. Government employees and contractors must immunize themselves against Covid with no alternative to testing, while any company with more than 100 employees must implement vaccine mandates that include medical and religious exemptions.

The requirements will cover two-thirds of all workers nationwide, Biden said, noting that 92% of the country’s active service members have been vaccinated. He ordered the shots for the military August 9.

“I’m making progress on vaccination regulations wherever I can,” said Biden.

– CNBCs John Melloy contributed to this article.

FDA backs Pfizer Covid booster photographs for older and weak folks

The Food and Drug Administration authorized Pfizer and BioNTechCovid-19 booster vaccination for people 65 and older and other at-risk Americans six months after completing their first two doses, leaving many Americans now eligible to receive the vaccinations.

The FDA’s decision on Wednesday, which has yet to be reviewed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, largely follows the recommendations it received more than on Friday from its main vaccine advisory committee eight-hour agency meeting.

The CDC’s Vaccine Advisory Committee is expected to vote on the FDA’s proposal on Thursday afternoon. If she recommends approval and the CDC approves it, the booster shots could start right away.

Last week, the FDA Advisory Committee on Vaccines and Related Biological Products voted 16-2 against distributing the vaccines to Americans 16 and older, before unanimously adopting an alternative plan to older Americans and those at high risk of developing serious illnesses to get sick to give a booster if they get the virus.

Although Americans 65 and older make up about 17% of the US population, they are most at risk of dying from Covid and account for more than 77% of all Covid deaths, according to the CDC.

The FDA has issued emergency clearance to administer Pfizer shots to elderly Americans and people ages 18 to 64 with conditions that put them at serious risk of disease. The agency also added a broad definition of anyone between the ages of 18 and 64 “whose frequent institutional or professional exposure” to the virus puts them at high risk of developing serious complications from Covid. That leaves enough room for the CDC to potentially release third doses for people in nursing homes, prisons, frontline health workers, and other key workers who were among the first Americans to receive their first syringes in December.

“The FDA took into account the committee’s input and conducted its own thorough review of the submitted data in order to make today’s decision,” said Dr. Peter Marks, the agency’s lead vaccines agency, in a statement. “We will continue to analyze the data submitted to the FDA regarding the use of booster doses of COVID-19 vaccines and, if necessary, make further decisions based on the data.”

The non-binding decision of the vaccination board it was expected to be controversial As the Biden administration has announced, it plans to start offering booster shots to the public as early as this week pending approval from US health regulators.

Although the agency has not always followed the advice of its committee, it often does. Still, Marks reminded the panel on Friday that federal regulators did not have to accept their written recommendation.

“We’re not tied to your vote at the FDA just for you to understand. We can adjust this as needed, ”he said.

In releasing the vaccinations, which will only apply to people who received the original Pfizer vaccine, the FDA cited a small study by the company of around 300 people who received the booster, data from the UK, as well as more comprehensive but less stringent data , from the Israeli health authorities.

Some scientists, including at least two to the FDA, had said they were not entirely convinced that every American who had received the Pfizer vaccine would need extra doses at this point. The country’s leading health authorities, including CDC director Dr. Rochelle Walensky, Acting FDA Commissioner Dr. Janet Woodcock and White House Senior Medical Advisor Dr. Anthony Fauci, however, already approved Biden’s booster plan in August.

Friday’s vote put the FDA panel in an “uncomfortable position” as the government had already announced that it would begin distributing boosters to the general public this month, said Dr. Bruce Farber, Head of Infectious Diseases at healthcare provider Northwell Health, before the panel’s recommendation.

Some committee members said they were concerned that there wasn’t enough data to make a recommendation, while others argued that the third vaccination should be limited to certain groups, e.g. Some members raised concerns about the risk of myocarditis in younger people and said more research was needed.

Dr. Phil Krause, an FDA vaccine regulator who is leaving the agency under pressure from the Biden administration to approve the shots, criticized the results presented at the meeting, saying that much of the data has not been verified by the federal agency or a peer-reviewed . He said the models used are complex and scientists need to make sure they are “getting the right results.”

“That’s part of the difficulty of looking at this type of data without a way for the FDA to review it,” he said.

In the outlines of the plans for last month’s launch Distribute boosters this week, administration officials cited three CDC studies showing that vaccines protection against Covid has waned over several months. Senior health officials said at the time they feared protection from serious illness, hospitalizations and deaths could “wear off” in the coming months, especially for those at higher risk or vaccinated during the earlier stages of vaccination.

Pfizer said in documents released last week that an observational study in Israel showed that a third dose of the Covid vaccine restored infection protection to 95% six months after a second vaccination. The data was collected from July 1 to August 30 when the rapidly expanding delta variant emerged across the country.

In a presentation on Friday, Dr. Sharon Elroy-Price of the Israeli Ministry of Health said that if officials there had not started distributing boosters in late July, the country would likely have exceeded its hospital capacity. She said health officials had seen a trend in fully vaccinated people in their 40s and 50s who became seriously ill with Covid.

“We didn’t want to wait to see these results, and we knew we had to vaccinate a larger section of the population to get the numbers down quickly,” she told the committee. Israeli health officials expected an average of 2,000 serious cases by the end of August, she said. “We have been able to dampen this effect and our severe cases are around 700 or less and have remained stable even though we still have days with 10,000 confirmed cases.”

Does giving cash to folks with substance use dysfunction ‘allow’ them? It’s difficult.

Money is just one of the currencies used to keep drug use going. People with SUD who are financially deprived of their rights can instead turn to riskier means to financial support B. Selling drugs, having transactional sex, or operating on credit with their dealer.

The relationship between substance use disorders and consumer spending is complex. Some research has documented it increased spending on drugs and increased risk for Overdose after cash incursions such as government checks. but other studies have also described an opposite trend, namely that higher cash payments do not increase drug use, but increase spending on essentials like food and shelter – suggesting that depriving drug users of resources of survival will also limit access to funds.

Having an addiction is a financial burden. It is often associated with the loss of critical resources such as employment, financial support and housing. Responding to a person’s drug use by “cutting them off” reinforces and sometimes even starts a cycle of poverty and homelessness.

A “hard love” approach is widespread, sometimes from seemingly credible sources. In part because it resonates with families and people affected by addiction, it promotes the healing belief that consequences can correct addictive behaviors. In some cases it can be. But in many, if not most, cases, this strategy goes against the definition of addiction – continued drug use despite negative consequences – and can cause permanent and fatal damage.

Alicia Ventura, director of special projects and research at Boston Medical Center’s Office-Based Addition Treatment Program, works with families who are struggling to best support their addicted loved ones. She says, “When families learn that a loved one is using alcohol or other drugs, it is impossible to protect them from myths about how to treat the family member who is using them. Myths about ‘enabling’, ‘co-dependency’, the ‘need to bottom out’ are omnipresent in society. “

Ventura goes on to describe how many families feel pressured to “cut off” their loved ones from financial support or to steal resources such as cell phones, cars or apartments. “These myths can be used to shame families who support their loved ones who are involved with drug use,” says Ventura.

Not surprisingly, families get into conflict; the message of cutting off people with addiction is everywhere. It is enshrined in federal and state guidelines, such as Social benefits and SNAP benefits, and even endorsed by some treatment centers. In the meantime, loved ones must deal with the pain and worry of watching a family member plunge into a terminal illness without assistance – not to mention the pain of people with addictions who experience it firsthand.

The assumption that people with SUD are simply wasting all of their money on drugs adds a cultural stigma that can be harmful to them. The nuances that current research and spending decisions show by people with SUD seem to be lacking in much of the public debate about how to help people in our community who use drugs. We need to start calling the notion of “cutting off” someone who uses drugs for what it is – a risky intervention that can have enormous negative consequences.

Lawyers and treatment centers offering this notion as a broad solution to substance use cannot go unchallenged. When necessary, the pursuit of financial alienation should be handled with extreme caution. All in all, we need to evaluate the way we think and talk about people with SUD in relation to their finances. Believe, and I would say the lie we tell ourselves, is that we help people by not helping people. We cannot continue to promote financial stability as a recovery mechanism while turning a blind eye to the routine financial disenfranchisement of people with substance use disorders.

Alex Woodruff is a health sciences specialist at the VA Boston Health System and the Partner center for evidence-based policy resources.

FDA panel recommends Pfizer’s Covid booster doses for individuals 65 and older

An influential advisory committee to the Food and Drug Administration on Friday rejected a proposal to distribute booster vaccinations from Pfizer and BioNTech Covid-19 Vaccine to the general public and scaled back those plans, unanimously recommending the third vaccination to people 65 and older and other at-risk Americans.

“In my opinion it is likely to be beneficial for the elderly and eventually could be indicated for the general population. I just think we’re not there yet in terms of the data, ”said Dr. Ofer Levy, a vaccine and infectious disease specialist at Boston Children’s Hospital.

The panel voted 16-2 against distributing the vaccines to Americans 16 and older before unanimously adopting an alternative plan to give boosters to older Americans and those at high risk of developing serious illness if they got the virus receive. This previously included people with diabetes, heart disease, obesity and other so-called comorbidities.

Pfizer stock closed 1.3% while BioNTech’s shares fell 3.6%.

The non-binding decision of the FDA’s Advisory Committee on Vaccines and Related Biological Products comes as the Biden government announced that it would begin offering booster vaccinations to the general public as early as next week pending approval from US health regulators . Although the agency has not always followed the advice of its committee, it often does. A final FDA decision could be made in a matter of hours. The Centers of Disease Control and Prevention has scheduled a two-day meeting next week to discuss plans to distribute the third syringes in the United States

“We’re not tied to your voice at the FDA just for you to understand. We can adjust this as needed,” recalled Dr. Peter Marks, the agency’s top vaccine regulator, joined the panel after the votes. He asked the group for suggestions on what other populations the FDA should consider for boosters, such as frontline health workers and other professions exposed to higher levels of exposure to Covid.

It was expected that the committee vote would be controversial, as some scientists included two senior FDA Officials involved in Friday’s meeting said they were not entirely convinced that every American who received the Pfizer vaccine now needs extra doses.

White House senior medical advisor Dr. Anthony Fauci said he wasn’t surprised they didn’t recommend the shots for anyone 16 and older. Fauci, who publicly supported Booster, hesitated in an interview on Friday “Closing bell“To guess what the committee would ultimately decide.

“I don’t want to pre-empt the advisory committee at the time they are deliberating,” he said.

Liesl Eibschutz, a Dartmouth University medical student, loads a syringe of Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine before giving the vaccine on the first day people 16 and older get the vaccine at Kedren Health on Thursday, Angeles, California.

Allen J. Cockroaches | Los Angeles Times | Getty Images

In published a paper Days before the advisory committee meeting, a leading group of scientists said the available data showed that vaccine protection against serious illnesses persists, even as efficacy against mild illness wears off over time. The authors, including two senior FDA officials and several World Health Organization scientists, argued Monday in the medical journal The Lancet that widespread use of booster syringes to the general public is currently inappropriate.

In the outlines of the plans for last month’s launch Distribute booster next week, Biden administration officials cited three CDC studies showing that vaccine protection against Covid has waned over several months. Senior health officials said at the time they feared protection from serious illnesses, hospitalizations and deaths could “wear off” in the coming months, especially for those at higher risk or vaccinated during the earlier stages of vaccination.

Before the vote, some committee members said they were concerned that there wasn’t enough data to make a recommendation, while others argued that the third shot should be limited to specific groups, e.g. illness. Some members raised concerns about the risk of myocarditis in younger people and said more research was needed.

Dr. Hayley Gans, a voting member, said she was “concerned” that the FDA asked the committee to review the entirety of the evidence presented Friday because some data, including on safety, were still inadequate.

Another member, Dr. Paul Offit said he would support boosters for people over 60 but struggled to support a third vaccination for younger groups due to a higher risk of myocarditis.

Ahead of Friday’s vote, the committee listened to several presentations on data supporting the widespread use of booster vaccinations, including by health officials in Israel, where officials began vaccinating the country’s population before many other countries and their citizens later July.

Phil Krause, an FDA vaccine regulator and co-author of The Lancet, criticized the results presented Friday, saying that much of the data had not been federally vetted or peer-reviewed. He said the models used are complex and scientists need to make sure they are “getting the right results.”

“That’s part of the difficulty of looking at this type of data without a way for the FDA to review it,” he said.

In documents released by the FDA on Wednesday, Pfizer said an observational study in Israel showed that a third dose of the Covid vaccine restored infection protection to 95% six months after a second vaccination. The data was collected from July 1 to August 30, when the rapidly expanding delta variant emerged across the country.

In a presentation on Friday, Dr. Sharon Elroy-Price of the Israeli Ministry of Health said that if officials there had not started distributing boosters in late July, the country would likely have exceeded its hospital capacity. Health officials began to see a trend that people in their 40s and 50s who were fully vaccinated became seriously ill with Covid.

“We didn’t want to wait for these results and we knew we had to vaccinate a larger section of the population to get the numbers down quickly,” she told the committee. Israeli health officials expected an average of 2,000 serious cases by the end of August, she said. “We have been able to dampen this effect and our severe cases are around 700 or less and have remained stable even though we still have days with 10,000 confirmed cases.”

She also said the booster was well tolerated by many people, citing data showing that out of approximately 2.9 million people who received the additional doses, there was only one case of myocarditis, a rare inflammation of the heart that occurred with mRNA vaccines.

Pfizer’s booster side effects are also similar to those seen after receiving the second dose of vaccine, said Dr. Joohee Lee, an officer with the FDA’s Office of Vaccines Research and Review, during the meeting.

Of the 289 booster recipients, ages 18 to 55 years old, observed in Pfizer’s Phase 3 study, 63.8% developed fatigue, 48.4% headache, and 39.1% muscle pain. The FDA examined side effects in 2,682 recipients of Pfizer’s second dose of Covid aged 16 to 55 years and reported fatigue in 61.5% of patients, headache in 54%, and muscle pain in 39.3%. One adverse event – swelling of the lymph nodes – occurred in 5.2% of booster recipients but only 0.4% of those who received their first two doses.

“The majority were mild to moderate and they resolved,” Lee said of the lymphadenopathy cases. “Though one is reported to be underway right now.”

CDC advises unvaccinated folks towards journey over Labor Day weekend

CDC director Dr. Rochelle Walensky advised unvaccinated people against traveling for the upcoming Labor Day weekend as the US battles a surge in Covid-19 hospital admissions from the highly contagious Delta variant.

“Given the current situation with disease transmission, we would say that people need to consider these risks for themselves when considering travel,” Walensky said during a Covid briefing at the White House Tuesday, noting that people who fully vaccinated and wearing masks can travel. “If you are not vaccinated, we advise you not to travel.”

Health systems in the US have struggled with record hospital admissions in the past few weeks, with several states including Washington, Mississippi and Florida all reached record highs in new Covid cases and hospital admissions.

The current seven-day average of new Covid infections in the US is 129,418 cases per day, a 10% decrease from the previous week’s seven-day average, Walensky said.

The seven-day average for Covid hospital admissions is around 11,500 hospital admissions per day, a decrease of about 5% from last week’s seven-day average, she said, citing data provided by the centers for that Disease control and prevention were collected.

Covid deaths had only increased 2.3% from the previous week to a seven-day average of 896 deaths per day, she said.

Walensky also recommended spending time with other vaccinated family members outdoors on Labor Day weekend and masking oneself indoors, especially in public, to prevent transmission.

“During the pandemic, we saw the vast majority of transmission among unvaccinated people happen indoors,” Walensky said. “Masks aren’t forever, but they are for now.”

48% of Younger Folks Say They Are Spending Extra Cash in 2021, Finds New Knowledge From Clutch | State Information

WASHINGTON, August 26, 2021 / PRNewswire / – Nearly half of people between 18 and 34 (48%) say their spending increased in 2021, according to a new survey from Clutch, the leading B2B rating and review platform.

Clutch surveyed Americans to see if they were spending more or less than they did in 2020. The data shows that consumers are generally spending more than they did a year ago and that middle-aged people are used to shopping online.

After a year of saving, young Americans are ready to open their wallets, which experts attribute to the improved economic environment and a reduction in COVID-related restrictions.

Some experts say that young people are particularly likely to spend more on travel expenses before some COVID restrictions are reintroduced.

“There is ongoing concern that we could face another lockdown in our area, especially as the weather turns cooler,” said Barker. “Millennials try to use this time to see as many new places as possible.”

Middle-aged people who spend more money online

Half of 35 to 54 year olds (50%) say their online spending increased in 2021. By comparison, only 43% of people between 18 and 34 and 37% of those aged 55 and over reported higher online spending that year.

Experts say the reduced in-person commerce during COVID-19 has made middle-aged consumers more comfortable shopping online.

“Before the pandemic, most middle-aged people did their shopping and grocery shopping in person,” said Cindy Corpis, CEO of SearchPeopleFree, a software development company. “But there has been a shift towards online shopping since the pandemic.”

Corpis believes the increase in online shopping by middle-aged consumers is a strong sign of the future of e-commerce.

“When the highest income age group begins to migrate to online shopping, sales and profits for e-commerce stores will soon increase significantly,” said Corpis.

If you have any questions about the survey or comments on the findings, please contact Anna Peck at 317537@email4pr.com.

Clutch is the leading rating and review platform for IT, marketing and business service providers. Over half a million service buyers and sellers use the Clutch platform every month, and the user base is growing at over 50% annually. Clutch was named one of the 500 Fastest Growing Companies in the US by Inc. Magazine and was listed as a Top 50 Startup by LinkedIn.