Children elevate cash for hospital staff who look after COVID-19 sufferers

A family of four from the city of Atlantis, South Florida – who had and won a battle against COVID-19 – are paying it on. The Baudo family were moved by how hard healthcare workers work to comfort COVID-19 patients. They decided to donate money from their homemade lemonade stand to Bethesda Hospital East in Boynton Beach. Sophie Baudo (10) and Anniina Makila (9) are professionals in running lemonade stands with the idea of ​​selling lemonade, “said Baudo. Baudo and Makila are best friends.” When we were little, we decided to be partners in sales to be, “Makila said safely under there, very safe, unbreakable and fireproof,” said Jack Baudo. Idalia Baudo said she and her entire family had COVID-19. “It just hit us, there were no symptoms or anything,” said Idalia Baudo. “It was just – boom – and then we were out.” She is proud that her children give something back. “I couldn’t be more moved that you have the compassion,” said Idalia Baudo. “This is something I always pray for that they have some sensitivity to be in tune with.” Hospital officials appreciate the support they are inspired to be a future fundraiser, “said Barbara James of the Bethesda Hospital Foundation.

A family of four from the city of Atlantis, South Florida – who had and won a fight against COVID-19 – continues to pay.

The Baudo family were so moved by how hard the health care workers work to comfort COVID-19 patients that they decided to donate the money raised from their homemade lemonade stand to Bethesda Hospital East in Boynton Beach.

Sophie Baudo, 10, and Anniina Makila, 9, are professionals in running lemonade stands.

“It started about a year ago when I first came up with the idea of ​​selling lemonade,” said Baudo.

Baudo and Makila are best friends.

“When we were little, we made the decision to become a partner in sales,” said Makila.

Sophie’s brother Jack Baudo, 8, collects the money.

“There’s a safe underneath, very safe, unbreakable and fire-proof,” says Jack Baudo.

Idalia Baudo said she and her entire family had COVID-19.

“It just hit us, there were no symptoms or anything,” said Idalia Baudo. “It was just – boom – and then we were out.”

She takes pride in the fact that her children give something back.

“I couldn’t be more moved that you have the compassion,” said Idalia Baudo. “This is something I always pray for that they have some sensitivity to be in tune with other people.”

The hospital management appreciates the support.

“I thought I’d come out and give them a little love and hopefully one of them will be inspired to do a future fundraiser,” said Barbara James of the Bethesda Hospital Foundation.

MMH is just not creating wealth off COVID sufferers

On Tuesday morning, Midland Health officials involved in the morning COVID update decided to reach out to those who believe the hospital was taking advantage of a pandemic to make money.

“We don’t make money,” said Stephen Bowerman, Midland Health’s chief operating officer. “Given the past few months and the surge in the census we’ve seen, if the city and county hadn’t provided more than $ 4.75 million in hospital grants to support these trips, we would have suffered significant losses to cover nurses I was talking about to cover incentive layers for our own staff and to give a bonus to all of our employees below director level. “

Bowerman refers to recent votes by the Midland City Council and Midland County Commissioners’ Court to allocate funds under the American Rescue Plan Act to Midland Memorial Hospital.

“We are very grateful to the city council and district commissioners for agreeing to this,” Bowerman said. “Our employees are grateful. I think our partnership with the city and the district is stronger than ever. Not that it was weak, but they were in step with us, all three organizations together, through this pandemic. “

Chief Medical Officer Larry Wilson also responded to allegations on social media and from hospital critics who said hospital officials “intentionally do not use some of the alternative therapies because it extends hospital stays and raises hospital money.”

Wilson said the facts do not support the narrative. He said in recent months as the COVID count hit record highs during the pandemic that the “net operating loss for our hospital” was double what Midland Health had in previous months.

Wilson said during Tuesday’s press conference that if there is a COVID admission, a bundled payment – a fixed number – will result in long hospital stays because oxygen requirements and other interventions exceed the amount normally payable. “

“So if you have a misunderstanding that we make money from COVID and that we are not doing everything we can to overcome it by vaccinating people using Regeneron Therapy,” said Wilson, “please realize that it’s not a winner for us and we try to make sure our community is healthy, which is our mission. “

Wilson said there was “no money” to making extended hospital stays or keeping MMH beds full, but the best option is to get a “diagnostic code” that will help admit a patient and he or she will quickly follow up Going home.

“It’s a win for us and we don’t see wins like that,” said Wilson.

Bowerman also said that people need to bear in mind that the hospital has suffered increased costs as they have to pay “incentive pay” for extra-shift workers and travel staff who help communities in an emergency but also receive top dollar for their work.

Russell Meyers, President / CEO of Midland Health, told city and county leaders that part of the money he requested from both facilities would be used on travel nurses and incentive shifts for a two month period.

Bowerman said Tuesday that although the COVID count has decreased by nearly 50 in the past few weeks, an unusually high count of 223 inpatients remains in the MMH.

“So don’t forget that we depend on outside collaborators for the work we do today,” said Bowerman. “The fact that the COVID count is falling is very positive. But we are not out of the forest. “

Midland Memorial’s bottom line has also been impacted as it cannot offer elective inpatient surgeries due to the need for beds from our COVID patients. Bowerman said there will be discussions over the next week about the hospital’s ability to do so.

“If we don’t offer elective inpatient surgery,” Bowerman said, “it tells you we’re still under a lot of stress in the hospital. So please keep that in mind. “

Pedal FARR set to boost cash for most cancers sufferers at Sioux Falls experience

Christmas would be hard, Tina Evers knew that.

It was winter 2018 and her husband’s recurrent colon cancer was getting worse. His hospice care took up most of her attention. Likewise the bills.

It was hard to think of buying gifts when the person who loved them was barely acting on their own, so exhausted from the constant pain and fatigue his illness was causing in his body.

But then they received a surprise check for $ 1,000. The money wasn’t much, but it let Evers focus on her family and husband instead of the bills and other worries.

“It was something that helped take the pressure off Christmas,” said Evers, a 47-year-old mother of three and stepmother of two. “It gave me the freedom to just be with him and not have to worry about the finances and just cherish those moments of being together as a family and enjoying Christmas.”

The check was from Pedal FARR, a local organization that donates money from an annual Sioux Falls bike ride to families whose loved ones have cancer

Her husband Brian died over a week in 2019, which made them even appreciate their last Christmas together.

Now Evers sits on the board of Pedal FARR helping set up his annual 25-mile drive.

The sixth annual Pedal FARR event begins between 11:30 am and 2:00 pm on August 14th at Remedy Brewing Co. in downtown Sioux Falls. Then it meets several other breweries and bars along the bike path, including stops at Monks and the Blue Rock Bar and Grill. This is the first year Pedal FARR has partnered with the American Cancer Society for this ride.

Pedal FARR founder Emily Connolly started the event to raise funds for a bike ride she took part in in 2016. But the next year she decided to donate her share of $ 3,000 to cancer patients.

Since then, the event has grown to more than 300 riders in 2020 and has raised approximately $ 11,000 to give gifts to 11 families in South Dakota, North Dakota, Iowa, and Minnesota. The nominations for the award winners will open on the Pedal FARR website on the day of the event.

This year, Connolly, 46, is hoping to “blow that out of the water” with a goal of reaching 500 bikers on this year’s ride. Drivers don’t have to raise any money to participate, she added, all they have to do is pay $ 25 as an early bird entry fee.If drivers want to buy a shirt too, it’s an extra $ 12, and registration increases after August 7th $ 35.

Braden Beach, Bailey Beach, Natalie Thompson, Jake Evers and Tina Evers pose for a picture during the annual FARR Pedal Ride.

“It’s people who come out to honor others who have died, to celebrate people who survived, and to support people who are still fighting,” Connolly said.

Mike Fox, 50, has taken every ride since they started raising funds for local cancer patients. Not only is it fun to play sports and hang out with friends, but it also gives the strength to see the event grow and succeed year after year, he said.

“It’s fun, and it’s definitely not a race,” said Fox. “You go at your own pace, hang out with your friends, and support cancer patients along the way. It’s such a small but big thing that we can do.”

Evers took her first ride in 2018, honoring a high school friend who was diagnosed with cancer. Even though Brian couldn’t ride next to her due to his diagnosis, he drove to each of the bar stations to ride anyway. The next year he was honored at the annual Share a Coke event where Evers could share his story and who he was with the group.

Lanette Kotlinek, Carey Haugen and Tina Evers post for a photo at the Shake a Coke with Deserae Honkamp Stop at the Pedal FARR event 2020.

This year’s Share a Coke Stop honors Chris Krueger, who was an avid cyclist who died of acute myeloid leukemia in 2016. Every Coke will have Chris’ name on it and when the participants drink, family members can remember and honor Krueger.

“When we added this stop, it was supposed to remind drivers why they were going,” said Connolly. “We drive for people who can’t, and we also allow their families and friends to remember them. For families, it’s a healing moment.”

Evers still attends every year to move forward and to pay up front the generosity her family received.

“It’s a nice, closing thing where you can learn and give back about these survivors and people fighting cancer,” Evers said. “I know I can’t cure cancer, but at least that gives me a way to help somehow.”

Ought to sufferers generate income by promoting their healthcare knowledge?

Emergency room overcrowding occurs when the demand for critical emergency care exceeds supply and poses a serious threat to safe patient care.

here Dr. Colin Dewar, Specialist in emergency medicine at University Hospitals Sussex NHS Trust, breaks down the main causes along with possible solutions.

What are the top causes of emergency room overcrowding (ED)?
Each emergency room is unique and crowding is a complex problem, but there is a helpful framework to categorize the three overarching causes of crowding.

First, as the population increases, so does the number of visitors to the ED. This rush has also been fueled by public health campaigns that focus on time-sensitive conditions such as heart attacks. In the UK, we have also seen a significant increase in ED visits after COVID. Input causes for ED crowing are therefore largely socio-economic.

There are then causes of crowding that are found once a patient has entered the emergency room. Bottlenecks arise from the fact that plants are often not equipped for the increased demand due to insufficient staffing or spatial arrangement. Many other factors can reduce patient flow resulting in overcrowding, e.g. other patients.

Finally, a reduced output of the ED can lead to overfill; this is more commonly referred to as the “exit block”. A shortage of inpatient beds in relation to demand can lead to a longer stay of the admitted patients in the emergency room. The exit block is often seen as the main contributing factor. Because of this, ED crowing is a hospital-wide problem and this must be taken into account when attempting to resolve it.

How does this affect patient care?
Overcrowding in the emergency room is the greatest threat to safe patient care in acute situations in industrialized countries. It affects patient care in terms of the quality of care they receive and this naturally affects patient outcomes.

ED crowing has been shown to be associated with higher staff workloads, delayed patient assessment, higher treatment costs, more frequent discharges of patients with high-risk clinical characteristics, poor infection prevention and control measures, and lower patient satisfaction, all of which are also associated with the likelihood of increasing reduce the patient’s compliance with their follow-up care plan.

This leads to lower patient outcomes, particularly in the form of high readmission rates, extended hospital stays, increased work stoppages, a higher frequency of medication errors and adverse events, and increased morbidity and mortality.

It is demoralizing for employees because they cannot provide the level of care they want when emergency rooms are constantly operated with needs that exceed both physical and human resources and capacities.

How has the pandemic affected this problem?
During the pandemic, attempts were made to keep patients out of the hospital whenever possible. This lowered admission rates for ED, but as the world normalized a bit there has been a significant spike in UK ED participation in the post-pandemic period and the challenge has come again.

The overcrowding has been compounded by the need to give patients adequate space to ensure safe care in the context of the pandemic.

It has shown the need for solutions that can be implemented in the short to medium term, as demand will only continue to increase, as it has in the last 20 years. And the main pressures that ED faces is the need for ED leaders to be actively involved in developing solutions to crowding. Emergency room corridors crowded with patients on carts and chairs should not be an accepted part of 21st century healthcare.

Where, if at all, is this problem currently being technically addressed?
While the implications for patient care are well known, previous solutions have been patchy and inconsistent.
In terms of technology, tools that allow superficial measurements of crowding to aid decision-making are such as: NEDOCS and ICMED For example, scores are available to emergency medicine executives, although their limitations and inadequacies are widely recognized.

Otherwise, the initiatives tend to focus on improving access to primary care and general practitioners as well as on alternative care models. All of them have their shortcomings. The Royal College of Emergency Medicine has consistently argued that the proportion of patients with poor visual acuity (who could be treated in alternative health care facilities) does not exceed 15% clinics or the increasing access to these clinics is likely to be limited.

Britain has also introduced goals such as all ED patients must be treated within 4 hours. This has increased the resources available for emergency doctors, but has not been able to keep up with the increasing demand from year to year.

Overall, this is an area where technological innovations need to be explored.

Can artificial intelligence and machine learning (AI / ML) help solve the problem?
I believe that only large data sets with AI / ML technology applied will be able to unlock the proactive modeling needed to tackle the overcrowding problem. KI / ML offers the promise of transforming the provision of acute services from the current reactive system to a proactive model.

To do this, we need a testable predictive tool for both emergency room needs and inpatient admission. This would be the first step in building a system that optimizes the resources available to meet the expected pressures, with a consequent reduction in ED crowding and the damage it causes.
Such a solution would transform care in emergency rooms and go a long way in ensuring safe and timely patient care while minimizing clinician burnout.

What role will technology play in this area in the future?
In the future, I see the advent of really advanced digital health technologies will also play a role in providing extremely rich, previously inaccessible information about patients’ physiological health (vital signs, etc.) in real time, as well as their exact location in the hospital. This could one day also supply ML-driven crowding models with this type of data, which could permanently change our understanding of what constitutes high-quality hospital care management.

ED crowding is therefore an issue in the healthcare landscape where the urgent need for change meets enormous potential for innovation. Therefore, now is the time to form an international consortium to capitalize on this convergence.

You work with electronRx, what are you doing in this area?
ElectronRx is a deep tech startup based in Cambridge, United Kingdom. They have an expert team of interdisciplinary scientists and engineers who develop a range of novel technologies to revolutionize patient engagement and support clinical decision-making, and take a consistently data-driven approach to the way we deliver health care and treatment of diseases to improve, to change.

With electronRx we are building an international consortium of emergency medicine executives who all work together passionately to overcome the long-standing, internationally recognized obstacle to high-quality patient care, ED crowding.

Our project aims to use their AI / ML skills to extract the value that lies dormant in a plethora of previously inaccessible healthcare insights across the hospital. Our goal is to create a holistic, AI-driven solution that delivers actionable insights with measurable results to fight ED crowing once and for all.

Walmart’s New Non-public Label Insulin Model Will Save Cash For Diabetes Sufferers

PARK CITY – JANUARY 22: A general view of Wal Mart during the 2004 January Sundance Film Festival … [+] October 22, 2004 Park City, Utah. (Photo by Mark Mainz / Getty Images)

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Walmart launched the first private branded analog insulin at a steep discount that saves 59% or 75% of the current cash price of branded insulin products if no insurance is taken out. It’s a real innovation and a dramatic step by Walmart to make insulin affordable for more people.

Approximately 34 million Americans live with diabetes, nearly 10% of the US population. Only 70% of these people are treated. Diabetes is the fastest growing chronic disease in the United States. Here we see the leadership of Walmart management to solve a serious health problem. It enables Walmart to bring health and wellbeing to all Americans, especially those who live in medically underserved areas.

The insulin costs about $ 73 per vial, or about $ 86 for a pack of pre-filled insulin pens. Savings of approximately $ 101 per branded insulin vial or $ 251 per pack of branded flex pens are reported. CNBC noted that as the number of people with diabetes increased, the cost of the 100-year-old drug has risen rather than fallen, and lawmakers have drawn attention. The annual cost of insulin for people with type 1 diabetes in the United States nearly doubled from $ 2,900 in 2012 to $ 5,700 in 2016.

Walmart worked directly with Novo Nordisk to ensure the savings were passed on to Walmart customers. Dr. Cheryl Pegus, EVP of Walmart’s Health and Wellness, noted that “the trademark was the same quality, safety and effectiveness” as other analog insulins.

Barron’s price increases have seen sales by the dominant insulin providers, which include Eli Lilly and Sanofi, increase by billions. You face competition from generic biosimilars in Europe.

Walmart is developing a strong presence in the health and wellness space. It has opened around 20 freestanding wellness clinics near Walmart Supercenters that offer teeth cleaning, annual checkups, and urgent care. Walmart also bought telemedicine company MeMD to deliver virtual health care, which should be a huge boom for customers in underserved fringe areas.

Walmart pharmacies will start selling the new product this week, with Sam’s Club going to sell it in July.

In well being care, extra money is being spent on sufferers’ social wants. Is it working?

  • By Phil Galewitz/Kaiser Health News

June 21, 2021 | 12:14 PM

When doctors at a primary care clinic in Philadelphia noticed many of its poorest patients were failing to show up for appointments, they hoped giving out free rides would help.

But the one-time complimentary ride didn’t reduce these patients’ 36% no-show rate at the University of Pennsylvania Health System clinics.

“I was super surprised it did not have any effect,” says Dr. Krisda Chaiyachati, the Penn researcher who led the 2018 study of 786 Medicaid patients.

Many of the patients did not take advantage of the ride because they were either saving it for a more important medical appointment, or preferred their regular travel method, such as catching a ride from a friend, a subsequent study found.

It was not the first time that efforts by a health care provider to address patients’ social needs — such as food, housing and transportation— failed to work.

In the past decade, dozens of studies funded by state and federal governments, private hospitals, insurers and philanthropic organizations have looked into whether addressing patients’ social needs improves health and lowers medical costs.

But so far it’s unclear which of these strategies, focused on so-called social determinants of health, are most effective or feasible, according to several recent academic reports that evaluated existing research on the interventions. The reports were produced by experts at Columbia, Duke and the University of California-San Francisco.

The new reports found that even when such interventions show promising results, they usually serve only a small number of patients. Another challenge is that several studies did not go on long enough to detect an impact, or they did not evaluate health outcomes or health costs.

“We are probably at a peak of inflated expectations, and it is incumbent on us to find the innovations that really work,” says Dr. Laura Gottlieb, director of the UCSF Social Interventions Research and Evaluation Network. “Yes, there’s a lot of hype, and not all of these interventions will have staying power.”

But because health care providers and insurers are so eager to find ways to lower costs, the limited success of social-need interventions has done little to slow the surge of pilot programs — fueled by billions of private and government dollars.

Paying for health, not just health care

Across the country, both public and private health insurance programs are launching large initiatives aimed at improving health by helping patients with unmet social needs. One of the biggest efforts kicks off next year in North Carolina, which is spending $650 million over five years to test the effect of giving Medicaid enrollees assistance with housing, food and transportation.

California is redesigning its Medicaid program, which covers nearly 14 million residents, to dramatically increase social services to enrollees.

These moves mark a major turning point for Medicaid, which, since its inception in 1965, largely has prohibited government spending on most nonmedical services. To get around this, states have in recent years sought waivers from the federal government and pushed private Medicaid health plans to address enrollees’ social needs.

The move to address social needs is gaining steam nationally because, after nearly a dozen years focused on expanding insurance under the Affordable Care Act, many experts and policymakers agree that simply increasing access to health care is not nearly enough to improve patients’ health.

That’s because people don’t just need access to doctors, hospitals and drugs to be healthy, they also need healthy homes, healthy food, adequate transportation and education, a steady income, safe neighborhoods and a home life free from domestic violence — things hospitals and doctors can’t provide, but that in the long run are as meaningful as an antibiotic or an annual physical.

Researchers have known for decades that social problems such as unstable housing and lack of access to healthy foods can significantly affect a patient’s health, but efforts by the health industry to take on these challenges didn’t really take off until 2010 with the passage of the ACA. The law spurred changes in how insurers pay health providers — moving them away from receiving a set fee for each medical service, to payments based on value and patient outcomes.

As a result, hospitals now have a financial incentive to help patients with nonclinical problems — such as housing and food insecurity — that can affect health.

Temple University Health System in Philadelphia launched a two-year program last year to help 25 homeless Medicaid patients who frequently use its emergency room and other ERs in the city. The program provides the 25 patients with free housing, and caseworkers to help them access other health and social services. For example, the caseworkers can help with furnishing the new apartments, setting up healthy delivered meals, and submitting applications for income assistance such as Social Security.

To qualify, participants had to have visited the emergency room at least four times in the previous year, with medical claims exceeding $10,000 for that year.

Temple has seen promising results when comparing patients’ experience before the study to the first five months they were all housed. In that time, the participants’ average number of monthly ER visits fell 75% and inpatient hospital admissions dropped 79%.

At the same time, their use of outpatient services jumped by 50% — an indication that patients are seeking more appropriate and lower-cost settings for medical care.

Living life as ‘normal people do’

One participant is Rita Stewart, 53, who now lives in a one-bedroom apartment in Philadelphia’s Squirrel Hill neighborhood, home to many college students and young families.

“Everyone knows everyone,” Stewart says excitedly from her second-floor walk-up. It’s “a very calm area, clean environment. And I really like it.”

Before joining the Temple program last July and getting housing assistance, Stewart was living in a substance abuse recovery home. She had spent a few years bouncing among friends’ homes and other recovery centers. Once she slept overnight in the city bus terminal.

In 2019, Stewart had visited the Temple ER four times for various health concerns, including the flu, anxiety, and a heart condition.

Now, Stewart meets with her caseworkers at least once a week for help scheduling doctor appointments, arranging group counseling sessions and managing household needs.

“It’s a blessing,” she says from her apartment, with its small kitchen and comfortable couch.

“I have peace of mind that I am able to walk into my own place, leave when I want to, sleep when I want to,” Stewart says. “I love my privacy. I just look around and just — wow. I am grateful.”

Temple University Health System helped Rita Stewart get a one-bedroom apartment in Philadelphia’s Squirrel Hill neighborhood. Stewart and other patients in Temple’s housing assistance program have since stabilized their lives and avoided unnecessary ER visits. (Kimberly Paynter/WHYY)

Stewart has sometimes worked as a nursing assistant and has gotten her health care through Medicaid for years. She still deals with depression, she says, but having her own home has improved her mood. And the program has helped keep her out of the hospital.

“This is a chance for me to take care of myself better,” she says.

Her apartment assistance is set to end next year, when the Temple program ends, but administrators say they hope to find all the participants permanent housing and jobs.

“Hopefully that will work out and I can just live my life like normal people do and take care of my priorities and take care of my bills and things that a normal person would do,” Stewart says.

“Housing is the second-most impactful social determinant of health after food security,” says Steven Carson, a senior vice president at Temple University Health System. “Our goal is to help them bring meaningful and lasting health improvement to their lives.”

Success with social interventions doesn’t come cheap

Temple is helping pay for the program; other funding comes from two Medicaid health plans, a state grant and a Pittsburgh-based foundation. A nonprofit human services organization helps operate the program.

Program leaders hope the positive results will attract additional financing so they can expand to help many more homeless patients.

The effort is expensive. The “Housing Smart” program cost $700,000 to help 25 people for one year, or $28,000 per person. To put this in perspective, a single ER visit can cost a couple of thousands of dollars. And “frequent flyer” patients can rack up health care bills many times that amount through ER visits and follow-up care.

If Temple wants to help dozens more patients with housing, it will need tens of millions of dollars more per year.

Still, Temple officials say they expect the effort will save money over the long run by reducing expensive hospital visits — but they don’t yet have the data to prove that.

The Temple program was partly inspired by a similar housing effort started at two Duke University clinics in Durham, North Carolina. That program, launched in 2016, has served 45 patients with unstable housing and has reduced their ER use. But it’s been unable to grow because housing funding remains limited. And without data showing the intervention saves on overall health care costs, the organizers have been unable to attract more financing.

Often there is a need to demonstrate an overall reduction in health care spending to attract Medicaid funding.

“We know homelessness is bad for your health, but we are in the early stages of knowing how to address it,” explains Dr. Seth Berkowitz, a researcher at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill.

Results remain to be seen

“We need to pay for health not just health care,” said Elena Marks, CEO of the Houston-based Episcopal Health Foundation, which provides grants to community clinics and organizations to help address the social needs of vulnerable populations.

The nationwide push to spend more on social services is driven first by the recognition that social and economic forces have a greater impact on health than do clinical services like doctor visits, Marks says. A second factor is that the U.S. spends far less on social services per capita compared with other large, industrialized nations.

“This is a new and emerging field,” Marks says, after reviewing the meta-evaluations of the many studies of social needs interventions. “The evidence is weak for some, mixed for some, and strong for a few areas.”

But despite incomplete evidence, Marks adds, the status quo isn’t working either: Americans generally have poorer health than their counterparts in other industrialized countries with more robust social services.

“At some point we keep paying you more and more, Mr. Hospital, and people keep getting less and less. So, let’s go look for some other solutions,” Marks says.

The COVID-19 pandemic has shined further light on the inequities in access to health services and sparked further interest in Medicaid programs to address social issues. Over half of states are implementing or expanding Medicaid programs that address social needs, according to a KFF study in October 2020. (The KHN newsroom is an editorially independent program of KFF.)

In many states, the Medicaid interventions are not intense: Often they involve simply screening patients for social needs problems or referring them to another agency for help. Only two states — Arizona and Oregon — require their Medicaid health plans to directly invest money into pilot programs to address the social problems that screenings reveal, according to a survey by consulting firm Manatt.

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, which is funding a growing number of efforts to help Medicaid patients with social needs, said it “remains committed” to helping states meet enrollees’ social challenges including education, employment and housing.

On Jan. 7, CMS officials under the Trump administration sent guidance to states to accelerate these interventions. In May, under President Joe Biden, a CMS spokesperson told KHN:

“Evidence indicates that some social interventions targeted at Medicaid and CHIP beneficiaries can result in improved health outcomes and significant savings to the health care sector.”

The agency cited a 2017 survey of 17 state Medicaid directors in which most reported they recognized the importance of social determinants of health. The directors also noted barriers to address them, such as cost and sustainability.

In Philadelphia, Temple officials now face the challenge of finding new financing to keep their housing program going.

“We are trying to find the magic sauce to keep this program running,” says Patrick Vulgamore, project manager for Temple’s Center for Population Health.

Sojourner Ahébée contributed to this report. She is the health equity fellow at “The Pulse,” WHYY’s health and science show.

This Shots story was produced as part of NPR’s health reporting partnership with WHYY and KHN (Kaiser Health News).

Intermountain and MDClone pairing saves cash as each sufferers and populations are higher understood

Photo: Courtesy Intermountain

The pairing of Intermountain with MDClone led to this significant improvements for patients with chronic kidney disease and end-stage kidney disease.

The collaboration has redesigned the way Intermountain did kidney care, said Dr. Michael Phillips of Intermountain, chief clinical and outreach services. It reduced uptake by about 90% by putting patients on a care route that would allow them, for example, to have dialysis at home.

“Overall, we made $ 30 million in savings in the year and a half that we did this,” Phillips said.

The backbone of MDClone is a data lake that organizes patient data in a linear timeline and allows the healthcare system to add virtually any information with a timestamp. This includes EHR, insurance and laboratory data, as well as factors influencing the social determinants of health.

Most people with kidney disease don’t know they have it, Phillips said. The IT platform was able to identify patients and their condition earlier.

MDClone, based in Israel, offers a technology platform and query system known as “self-service data” Analytics“Answers to questions can be obtained on the same day instead of waiting six to eight months.

“It’s this morning instead of seven months,” said Phillips.

One of the key factors in moving from seven months to seven minutes is getting caregivers back on their feet. When there’s a long delay between requesting and getting data, people stop asking, he said.

Intermountain is able to publish data on patients as synthetic data on population groups without compromising personal health information. Third parties can access this data and bundle it with other information around the world to better understand the population.

“Our goal is to share data with external health systems and in scientific publications,” said Phillips. “It democratizes data. Synthetic data is a great opportunity that we haven’t had before. It divides data between large groups of people: one focused on caring for individual patients, the other on population behavior. Understanding those populations is Keys to understanding how much money it takes to care for them. ”

WHY THAT IS

The bottom line is that good care is inexpensive. The savings are in better health outcomes and fewer hospital admissions.

Intermountain is able to fill gaps in care by identifying risks to make care more cost effective, Phillips said.

“Much of the savings are gifts that are given over and over,” he said. “It slows the progression of kidney disease and avoids admissions. Patients go home on dialysis. They tend to be better at home. There is less interaction with the health system, emergency care, and emergency rooms. By involving people in their own care, goes they just do better. ” . ”

THE BIGGER TREND
Intermountain set up a venture fund two years ago to invest in companies that would help advance his mission.

MDClone meets these criteria. The company has been with Intermountain for several years, said Josh Rubel, MDClone’s chief commercial officer.

MDClone is used in other systems in the US and elsewhere.

Further growth is expected for the platform at Intermountain. Work with cardiovascular patients and others continued, Phllips said.

Intermountain has approximately 65% ​​of its patients at full risk.

“It’s about putting people on care,” he said, “and getting the kind of care they should get. The information system that is the backbone allowed us to focus on delivering care that way as we needed it. MDClone helped us. ”

Twitter: @SusanJMorse
Email to the author: susan.morse@himssmedia.com

Hope Lodge elevating cash to reopen for households of most cancers sufferers

Fighting cancer can be even more difficult when you have to travel for treatment. For more than 20 years, the Kansas City Hope Lodge has provided patient families with free accommodation, but it is closed during the pandemic. They ask for the help of the community to open again. “Giving Hope a Home.” That is the promise of the Kansas City Hope Lodge, but during the pandemic it was unable to fulfill its mission of providing free housing to families of cancer patients traveling for treatment. “This opportunity to come here made it so much easier,” said Sheryl Coppinger of Winchester, Kansas. She has been to Hope Lodge in the past while her husband was being treated for cancer. Since it is closed, they stay in a rental property for more than a month. She knows for others it’s longer. “We met people who had been here for five months,” said Coppinger. “Without getting to Hope Lodge, I just don’t know how you would even get a chance to do what you had to do to fight and try to stay alive.” Paying for accommodation is an added financial burden for families already struggling with soaring bills and stress. “There are so many patients, nearly 4,000 a year, who come here to access Hope Lodge,” said Jeff Wright, who works with cancer patients in the Kansas City area and helped raise funds to reopen the lodge collect. “In order not to have it open today, they will have to spend their own money to stay in another hotel or find an apartment.” The lodge closed in March 2020, with concerns about immunocompromised patients and dwindling resources. The lodge costs approximately $ 600,000 per year to operate, including staff and operating costs. The American Cancer Society has yet to raise $ 30,000 to reopen. “So many patients, so many families. We have to open it, ”said Wright. He said he looked forward to welcoming the families back. “It will be one of the best days of my whole year,” he said. “Getting to a center where you have so much hope is what we need.” The aim is to reopen Hope Lodge at the beginning of summer. You can help now by donating here.

Fighting cancer can be even more difficult when you have to travel for treatment. For more than 20 years, the Kansas City Hope Lodge has provided patient families with free accommodation, but it is closed during the pandemic. They ask for the help of the community to open again.

“Giving Hope a Home.”

That is the promise of the Kansas City Hope Lodge, but during the pandemic it was unable to fulfill its mission of providing free housing to families of cancer patients traveling for treatment.

“This opportunity to come here made it so much easier,” said Sheryl Coppinger of Winchester, Kansas.

She has been to Hope Lodge in the past while her husband was being treated for cancer.

Since it is closed, they stay in a rental property for more than a month. She knows for others it’s longer.

“We met people who had been here for five months,” said Coppinger. “Without getting to Hope Lodge, I just don’t know how you would even get a chance to do what you had to do to fight and try to stay alive.”

Paying for accommodation is an added financial burden for families already struggling with soaring bills and stress.

“There are so many patients, nearly 4,000 a year, who come here to access Hope Lodge,” said Jeff Wright, who works with cancer patients in the Kansas City area and helped raise funds to reopen the lodge collect. “In order not to have it open today, they will have to spend their own money to stay in another hotel or find an apartment.”

The lodge closed in March 2020, with concerns about immunocompromised patients and dwindling resources. The lodge costs approximately $ 600,000 per year to operate, including staff and operating costs. The American Cancer Society has yet to raise $ 30,000 to reopen.

“So many patients, so many families. We have to open it, ”said Wright.

He said he looked forward to welcoming the families back.

“It will be one of the best days of my whole year,” he said. “Getting to a center where you have so much hope is what we need.”

The aim is to reopen Hope Lodge at the beginning of summer. You can help through now donate here.

East St. Louis dwelling well being care employee sentenced after authorities say she stole aged sufferers’ IDs, cash | Regulation and order

FAIRVIEW HEIGHTS – An East St. Louis woman was sentenced to one year and one day in prison Wednesday after pleading guilty to stealing identity and money from elderly patients.

Erica Rose, 31, pleaded guilty in November of a conspiracy to commit bank and wire fraud and escalated identity theft, according to the US Attorney’s Office for the southern district of Illinois.

According to authorities, Rose worked as a home nurse for a company called CareLink that looked after elderly patients.

In addition to her jail term, Rose will be sentenced to two years of judicial surveillance and pay nearly $ 10,000 in restitution when she is released.

Rose’s co-defendant Ashley McKinney has a pending arrest warrant. Prosecutors say Rose gave the McKinney patient information.

Panicked sufferers name medical doctors as Covid vaccine hesitancy rises with J&J blood clot concern

More Americans will likely refuse to get one Johnson & JohnsonThe Covid-19 vaccine, according to U.S. health officials, said six women had developed a rare bleeding disorder with one dead and another in critical condition, public health and vaccines experts told CNBC on Tuesday.

The Food and Drug Administration asked the states early Tuesday Temporarily stop with J & J’s single shot Vaccine “out of caution” after six women aged 18 to 48 years of the approximately 6.9 million people who received the shot developed a bleeding disorder known as cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, or CVST.

All women developed the condition that occurs when a blood clot forms in the venous sinuses of the brain that prevents blood from flowing back to the heart within about two weeks of receiving the shot from the brain, health officials told reporters on a phone call .

“People who have recently received the vaccine in the past few weeks should be aware if they are looking for symptoms,” said Dr. Anne Schuchat, the deputy chief director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention during a press conference Tuesday. “If you have received the vaccine and have severe headache, stomach pain, leg pain, or shortness of breath, you should contact your doctor and see a doctor.”

Shortly after the FDA issued the warning, more than a dozen states as well as pharmacies took steps to stop the vaccinations with J & J’s vaccine, sometimes replacing scheduled appointments with the Pfizer and Moderna Covid vaccines. Some doctors say they are already taking calls from worried patients.

People were already skeptical about vaccines before the coronavirus emerged as a brand new pathogen from China in December 2019. U.S. health officials’ warning to states may be even more reluctant to take J & J’s shot and the other vaccines, and threatens to block the vaccine Health experts warned CNBC of the recovery from the pandemic affecting more than 31.2 million Americans infected and killed at least 562,718 people in just over a year.

“Unfortunately, this is likely to exacerbate those who are a little hesitant about getting a vaccine,” said Isaac Bogoch, an infectious disease specialist who served on several drug data and safety oversight panels. “Senior public health officials need to continue to be open, honest, transparent, and most importantly, contextualize that this is a low risk.”

According to Dr. Anthony Fauci, President Joe Biden’s chief medical officer, the goal is to vaccinate between 70% and 85% of the US population – or about 232 to 281 million people – to achieve herd immunity and suppress the pandemic.

To date, more than 120 million Americans, or 36% of the total US population, have received at least one dose of a Covid-19 vaccine, according to the CDC. Around 74 million Americans, or 22% of the total US population, are fully vaccinated, according to the CDC. Children under the age of 16 are not yet eligible to shoot in the United States, and some adults are likely to refuse to get a vaccine.

“This throws a wrench into the plans. It will slow down the rollout,” said Dr. Jeffrey Kahn, director of the Berman Institute of Bioethics at Johns Hopkins University. “People will say, ‘I don’t want this, I want one of the others who don’t have this problem,’ even if it’s an extremely rare occurrence.”

Some americans, especially in black, Hispanic, and rural communitieswere already reluctant to get the J&J vaccine, especially because they found it to be worse than Pfizer and Moderna. The highly effective J&J shot, especially against serious illnesses, showed 72% effectiveness in protecting against Covid in the US about a month after inoculation. This is comparable to the effectiveness of the two-dose vaccines from Pfizer and Moderna of about 95%.

Single-dose vaccines like J&J were critical in “getting into communities where a two-dose regimen was impractical or even possible,” Kahn said. US health officials used J & J’s vaccine primarily to reach poorer urban and rural areas where residents could not easily get to a vaccination clinic or did not have reliable internet access.

“These communities are also the hardest hit by Covid,” said Kahn. “Using J&J interrupt … one stroke to do this effectively and quickly.”

Dr. Stephen Schrantz, who was part of the team leading a J&J vaccine study at the University of Chicago Medicine, said he already had patients who didn’t want the J&J vaccine and said the news would give them more evidence give to say, “See, I told you.”

“I suspect that vaccine adoption and uptake will slow down, there will be a move away from the J&J vaccine even if the CDC and FDA conclude that there is no causal link,” he said. “And when the mask comes off, there may be more cases like we have in Michigan that show up elsewhere.”

Dr. Scott Gottlieb, who sits on Pfizer’s board of directors, predicted the move will nonetheless fuel some people’s “reluctance” to get a Covid vaccine.

“Even if there is no causal link, even if it is extremely rare, we will likely see that the entire conversation is now ignited on social media.” he told CNBC in an interview.

Dr. Purvi Parikh, an infectious disease allergy and immunology specialist at NYU Langone Health, described the FDA warning Tuesday as a “double-edged sword” and said it would likely raise concerns for already reluctant Americans. She also said she had already received “panic calls” from her own patients about the J&J vaccine.

“But if anything, I would like to repeat again: This only gives me more confidence in our system because these security checks work. Hopefully it will give some people peace of mind,” she added on “Squawk on the Street”. “” “Again, to look at the bigger picture, the benefits still far outweigh the risks of this vaccination.”

Dr. Archana Chatterjee, pediatric infectious disease specialist and member of the FDA’s Advisory Committee on Vaccines and Related Biological Products, echoed Parikh’s remark. She added that there is nothing “unusual” in the way US health officials are addressing the problem.

“This is a normal procedure that occurs,” she said.

“But of course whenever a serious adverse event is reported about a vaccine that raises public concern,” she added. “If you talk about vaccine trust or vaccine reluctance, could it have an impact? It certainly is possible.”

Dr. Paul Offit, another member of the Advisory Committee on Vaccines and Allied Biological Products, hopes Americans will be “rational” about the problem, adding that cases of blood clots seem extremely rare. He noted that convincing people in hard-to-reach communities could be a challenge.

“It should be reassuring to the people that the officials are still looking [at the vaccine,] even for rare side effects, “he said.

CNBC’s Kevin Stankiewicz contributed to this article.