Type and syncopation, regardless of the precipitation – Pasadena Star Information

 

  • Tenessee State University Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’ Bandfest in Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • Tenessee State University Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’ Bandfest in Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • Tenessee State University Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’ Bandfest in Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • Tenessee State University Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’ Bandfest in Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Salvation Army Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’ Bandfest in Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • Tenessee State University Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’ Bandfest in Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • Tenessee State University Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’ Bandfest in Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • Tenessee State University Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’ Bandfest in Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Downington West Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’s Bandfest in Jackie Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Downington East Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’s Bandfest in Jackie Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Downington West and East Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’s Bandfest in Jackie Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Salvation Army Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’ Bandfest in Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Salvation Army Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’ Bandfest in Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Salvation Army Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’ Bandfest in Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Salvation Army Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’ Bandfest in Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • Tenessee State University Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’ Bandfest in Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Salvation Army Tournament of Roses Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’ Bandfest in Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Mira Mesa High School Marching Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’s Bandfest in Jackie Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Downington East Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’s Bandfest in Jackie Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Downington West and East Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’s Bandfest in Jackie Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Mira Mesa High School Marching Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’s Bandfest in Jackie Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Mira Mesa High School Marching Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’s Bandfest in Jackie Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Waukee Schools Combined Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’s Bandfest in Jackie Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Waukee Schools Combined Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’s Bandfest in Jackie Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Pasadena City College Tournament of Roses Honor Band and Herald Trumpets perform during the Tournament of Roses’s Bandfest in Jackie Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Arcadia High School Marching Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’s Bandfest in Jackie Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Arcadia High School Marching Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’s Bandfest in Jackie Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Arcadia High School Marching Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’s Bandfest in Jackie Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Arcadia High School Marching Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’s Bandfest in Jackie Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Arcadia High School Marching Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’s Bandfest in Jackie Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Mira Mesa High School Marching Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’s Bandfest in Jackie Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Mira Mesa High School Marching Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’s Bandfest in Jackie Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Pasadena City College Tournament of Roses Honor Band and Herald Trumpets perform during the Tournament of Roses’s Bandfest in Jackie Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Pasadena City College Tournament of Roses Honor Band and Herald Trumpets perform during the Tournament of Roses’s Bandfest in Jackie Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Arcadia High School Marching Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’s Bandfest in Jackie Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Remo preshow with the Santiago High School drumlins performs during the Tournament of Roses’s Bandfest in Jackie Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Pasadena City College Tournament of Roses Honor Band and Herald Trumpets perform during the Tournament of Roses’s Bandfest in Jackie Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Remo preshow with the Santiago High School drumlins performs during the Tournament of Roses’s Bandfest in Jackie Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Pasadena City College Tournament of Roses Honor Band and Herald Trumpets perform during the Tournament of Roses’s Bandfest in Jackie Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Pasadena City College Tournament of Roses Honor Band and Herald Trumpets perform during the Tournament of Roses’s Bandfest in Jackie Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

The persistent precipitation that pounded Pasadena on Wednesday, Dec. 29, was reminiscent of a midwestern winter — a condition so many of this year’s Bandfest participants sought to leave behind when they boarded their planes to head west this week.

Nonetheless, hundreds of the country’s best musicians weren’t going to let a little soaking keep them from strutting. They headed for Robinson Stadium to kick off the annual celebration of the marching bands and drill teams that will perform in Saturday’s Rose Parade.

Bandfest, hosted by the Tournament of Roeses, is traditionally one of the more popular events in the leadup to Pasadena’s New Year’s Day Parade. But this year’s showcase had to weather concerns over the enduring coronavirus pandemic and a day of relentless showers.

In response, marching bands and support teams from such states as Tennessee, Iowa and Pennsylvania bundled up, dressed down and scaled back performances so they would still be able to strut their stuff at Pasadena City College.

In total, nine bands performed during eight performances Thursday, including:

  • Arcadia Apache Marching Band and Color Guard;
  • Downingtown Blue and Gold Marching Band (East and West editions) ;
  • Mira Mesa High School “Sapphire Sound” Marching Band and Color Guard;
  • Pasadena City College Tournament of Roses Honor Band and Herald Trumpets;
  • The Salvation Army Tournament of Roses Band;
  • Tennessee State University Aristocrat of Bands;
  • Waukee Warrior Regiment; and
  • Northwest Royal Brigade.

Street clothes, plastic ponchos and colorful umbrellas — in the crowd and on the field — replaced the vibrant gameday uniforms usually donned by the bands who traveled hundreds of miles in recent days to march alongside the flower-filled floats that are still being constructed as the final hours leading up to the Rose Parade draw near.

Despite the rain on Wednesday, about 1,000 people attended Wednesday’s event, according to organizers.

The forecast for Saturday’s parade, meanwhile, is for a cold, but dry and sunny morning. No matter the weather, Tournament of Roses officials said this week that the parade and Rose Bowl football game still have the green light — though they are watching the daily coronavirus statistics amid the current winter surge. Los Angeles County reported 16,510 new COVID-19 cases on Wednesday, one of the highest daily totals of the pandemic.

Style amid the soaking

Water forced some woodwind players and pageant props to the sidelines, joining folks like Northwest Royal Brigade Band Director Chris Strohmaier, who shivered in a soaked sweater.

No matter where they found themselves, though, almost all of the Bandfest participants smiled broadly during the performances — even those who were dancing while drenched, clad in little more than spandex.

That’s because, Strohmaier said, students from the small town of Waukee, Iowa have been waiting two years for the opportunity to perform in Pasadena.

“Last year was supposed to celebrate our last year as a one high-school district,” he said, but the coronavirus pandemic postponed the 2021 trip. Fortunately, the town of 20,000 people was able to send both of its high school bands to perform in this year’s procession down Colorado Boulevard.

The rain eventually lightened during the evening, as did the crowd, but those who stayed until the end were treated to the Aristocrat of Bands, a nickname that resonates throughout the South.

Tennessee State’s Sophisticated Ladies and famed Fantastic Four were united alongside nearly 300 of the school’s marching band members to give Southern California a taste of the Nashville’s trademark Music City funk — which will also be on display at Crypto.com arena this week when the talented Tennesseans perform on the hardwood during a Lakers NBA game.

Tenessee State University Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’ Bandfest in Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

Complete with booming drumlines and fierce, freestyle dance moves that had the audience screaming, Band Director Reginald McDonald described the performance as one-of-a-kind.

“One of the things about our band is we always try to carry ourselves in a unique way,” McDonald said, highlighting the instrumentalists and dancers who rocked the house just a few minutes prior. “I was a little apprehensive or anxious, if you will, with regards to the way the kids would perform in the weather. But they did a tremendous job, they soaked it all in, everybody got focused, and it was like the rain was a part of the show.”

McDonald encouraged locals to come see Tennessee State University perform during the Rose Parade because bands at historically Black colleges and universities are truly unique.

More to come

Thursday’s second day of Bandfest has been divided into two parts. The first round will begin at 10 a.m. and feature one of the teams who will represent the Big 10 and Pac 12 in this weekend’s Rose Bowl game. The next round begins promptly at 2 p.m. and will include the other university set to play in the “Granddaddy of ‘Em All.” (Which Rose Bowl-bound band will perform in which session? That still wasn’t announced on Wednesday.)

Experts predict Thursday will be another wet day in Pasadena so attendees are advised to bundle up before heading out.

“You’ve probably all heard the term: It never rains in Southern California,” laughed Robert Shen, president of Bandfest sponsor Reemo. “I think we need to add one word to that, which is: It almost never rains in Southern California.”

Shen, Rose Parade President Bob Miller, master of ceremony Grier Ross and other VIPs took to the field to thank all who attended the “rain-soaked day.”

“We thank the kids. We thank the directors,” Shen said. “And last but not least, all of you folks for braving the rain, sitting in the bleachers, cheering these kids on. This event wouldn’t be special without all of you here today.”

How is Pasadena spending its pandemic rescue cash? – Pasadena Star Information

As the dust settles on the pandemic, city leaders ponder the best way to spend a huge injection of cash: $ 52.6 million in federal rescue dollars.

The first increment, $ 26.3 million, came fresh from Washington, DC last week, part of the $ 1.9 trillion American rescue plan law stopped by congress and signed by President Joe Biden in March. The second payment, another $ 26.3 million, is due in June 2022.

But here’s the catch. The city isn’t entirely sure whether the second pile will land – at least in its full form.

“There is a growing concern across the country, from mayors and cities in every state that the second 50% payment could be reclaimed from the federal government through legislative negotiations,” said Matthew Hawkesworth, the city’s chief financial officer, at a city council meeting last week.

People wearing masks because of the coronavirus pandemic walk past Pasadena City Hall on Saturday, May 2, 2020. (File photo)

Efforts to reduce funding have already started, officials said, who expect the trials to continue. In short, in a highly polarized setting on Capitol Hill, there is concern that the city may not see this second half and they have tried this week to include everything they could.

At the same time, there was resistance to this scramble as residents and elected leaders urged the city to take a much more “global” look at where this money is going.

Federal rescue finance itself has certain baskets that it has to go to. It can only be used to:

    • Respond to the public health emergency or its adverse effects.
    • Give key workers a reward during COVID-19 restrictions.
    • Coverage of the city for services it could not afford due to pandemic-related revenue shortfalls.
    • And / or for necessary investments in water, sewer or broadband infrastructure.

Nonetheless, it has enormous potential in a city that has suffered significant financial losses in sales and tourism revenues, and almost one $ 900 million budget for fiscal year 2021-22 – a budget that needs to be approved by next week. Both the city Rose Bowl operating company and the Pasadena Center operating company Revenues plummeted during the pandemic.

Everyone agrees that federal funds are urgently needed. But how it is allocated is more complicated.

At last week’s council meeting, with budget deadlines looming, the urgency was seen building as members stood up on a number of points – amid community rejection – to commit federal funding to certain city programs .

These included the Pasadena Convention and Visitors Bureau’s tourism recovery plan, a $ 475,000 infusion for hiring three employees as the city’s hospitality industry recovers from the pandemic. Officials see the funding as critical to bringing the city’s ailing hospitality industry back to health.

But several members of the public opposed it, fueling their continued pressure on the city to divert funds into housing programs, the health department and youth programs and away from police tourism and capital improvements, things they say the money is not supposed to cover.

“They find money for business, they find money for retail, but when it comes to housing programs and financing offers for the homeless, they always have difficulty finding money, or they just say they don’t have the money,” said Sonja Berndt , a housing attorney, warned the city not to go too quickly on a wish list of items to be funded with the rescue funds. “There is never money or crumbs for the poor, the weak, the marginalized.”

Berndt and others called on the city council to better include the voices of the citizens in the discussion about how to deal with federal aid money. And Berndt complained that such money goes back into the city’s general fund when departments like Housing and Public Health get relatively little of the funding pie compared to the city’s police force.

The result, she said, is that violence prevention, supportive housing, public health and community programs are coming under pressure.

The city council eventually approved $ 1.075 million in federal aid to go towards public health responses, public health improvements, and funding the visitor’s office.

But the council members also seemed to get the message that the decisions should not be rushed.

“I think we should have a more global discussion in the council, where we’re not just looking at the council’s allocation, but also how the county spends its dollars, how the state spends its dollars – on rent subsidies, for example – and trying to Strengthening areas that need strengthening while giving more input to the public and the council, ”Mayor Victor Gordo said at the June 14 meeting.

His colleagues seemed to agree.

“Fifty million is a lot of money,” said Councilor Andy Wilson, calling it “a golden opportunity” to decide how to spend it.

City officials offered a laundry list of items a framework for future funding, everything from a public health fund to offsetting parking fund losses to capital improvements related to housing support and infrastructure.

In response, the council decided to organize public workshops, as the city council’s finance committee also plays a role in creating a new framework. The priorities would eventually return to the entire city council for approval.

One obvious benefit is that most federal funding does not yet need to be budgeted, even though there are deadlines in federal legislation.

“The good thing is that some of us have been pushed back,” said Berndt. “We said, ‘No, let’s have an overall strategy, not a piecemeal thing.’ We need a kind of public relations work where the public can make comments. “

La Salle sends its seniors out in type with spring ending soccer win – Pasadena Star Information

The seniors of the La Salle High soccer team have faced many adversities and struggles in their four years. They had three different head coaches who suffered a 3-7 season, a 0-10 season, and then the COVID-19 pandemic that obliterated the traditional fall season and nearly prevented that shortened spring season.

But they fought their way through and ended their high school careers with a convincing 31-7 win over St. Anthony on their home field on Friday night in the Del Rey League. The win put La Salle (3-2, 3-1) second in the league.

“These guys played great tonight,” said La Salle head coach Ben Buys of his seniors. “It wasn’t about winning league games, but three, even though it was a spring season. In addition, this spring you see a lot of people saying they don’t have enough people. We had 26 tonight. We had injuries. Our best player, Marcus Powe, didn’t play (because of the COVID protocol). There are many reasons why they might give up and apologize and throw in. But they didn’t. “

“We are very grateful that we can play and play the five games we had,” said Giovanni Butteri, La Salle’s senior receiver. “This season has been pushed back again and again. When we finally got a game we were so excited and ready to play.”

The Lancers were leading 12-7 at halftime before pulling back in the third quarter thanks to some big offensive games and a strong defense that looked completely different from the one that allowed Harvard-Westlake to score 58 points last week.

La Salle’s Chris Miller made a mistake on the two-yard line at St. Anthony. Rashaad Austin ran back into the end zone two games later to give the Lancers a 19-7 lead in the middle of the third quarter.

After La Salle forced St. Anthony to play after a three, he took over his next possession on his 36-yard line. Quarterback Richie Munoz then found freshman David Mysza wide open on the field for a 64-yard touchdown that extended the lead to 25-7.

“It was definitely satisfying,” said Mysza. “I’m glad I was able to help the team. It was fun.”

La Salle finished early in game four when Austin scored a seven meter run. Austin finished with 24 trages and 92 yards.

The Lancers scored the first goal of the game after David Vanden Bosch ended St. Anthony’s inaugural possession early in the first quarter. La Salle then took over on its own 30-yard line. The Lancers moved the ball onto St. Anthony’s 35-yard line when Munoz fell back to pass. He was under pressure and struggled to his feet before finding an open Giovanni Butteri who practically went into the end zone to give La Salle a 6-0 lead.

The Lancers extended their lead to 12-0 early in the second quarter when they completed a nine-game 63-yard drive that twice demonstrated Munoz’s ability to evade tackle. At one game it looked like he was running but then suddenly stopped short of the scrimmage line and found Aidan Leyland’s downfield for a 58-yard completion.

La Salle advanced onto St. Anthony’s two-yard line and faced a 4th and a gate. It looked like St. Anthony was going to stop as Munoz was pressured and ran backwards. But he crawled to his left and found Butteri wide open in the end zone.

Butteri finished the game with three receptions for 47 yards and two touchdowns.

“It was a lot of fun,” laughed Butteri when asked if he would like to score two touchdowns in his last game.

While the seniors emerge victorious, La Salle has a young corps of players led by Munoz, who is only in his sophomore year. He finished the game with 11 of 17 passes for 253 yards and three touchdown passes. Mysza caught five passes for 133 yards and is optimistic about the future of the program.

“I think we have a lot to do,” said Mysza. “We will do very well in the future. (Munoz) It’s only getting better and our corps is getting bigger and stronger. I think we’ll be a really good team. “

DEA Warns of Phone Scammers Impersonating Brokers and Demanding Cash – Pasadena Now

The Drug Enforcement Administration warned late last week that phone scammers were posing as DEA agents with the aim of extorting money or stealing personal information.

A new public announcement says the DEA will never call to ask for money or ask for personal information.

There are differences in the false narrative, including that the target’s name was used to rent a vehicle that was stopped at the border and contained a large amount of drugs, the DEA said.

The caller then has the target verify their social security number or claim that their bank account has been compromised.

In some cases, the caller threatens the target with fictitious drug seizure arrest and instructs the person over the phone to send money by gift card or wire transfer to pay a “fine” or to help investigate or reset their bank account.

In addition, scammers have “forged” legitimate DEA phone numbers to convince their target that the call was legitimate – or text photos of what appear to be legitimate law enforcement cards with a photo.

Reported scam tactics are constantly changing, but they often share many of the same characteristics. Callers use fake names and ID numbers, as well as names of known DEA officers or police officers in local departments.

Anyone who receives a call from someone claiming to be with DEA ​​should report the incident to the FBI at www.ic3.gov.

Additionally, the Federal Trade Commission offers recovery steps, shares information with more than 3,000 law enforcement agencies, and accepts reports reportfraud.ftc.gov.

For more information about identity theft protection, see www.identitytheft.gov.

Reporting these scam calls helps federal agencies find, arrest, and stop the criminals involved in this scam.

Imitating a federal agent is a violation of federal law that can be punished with a prison sentence of up to three years. In the case of escalated identity theft, a prison sentence of at least two years plus fines and reimbursement is imposed.

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