Omaha sees resurgence of townhome-style improvement

Joe Henkin and his wife absolutely love their Dundee townhouse. “You have trees, you have a lot of sun. It’s a great place, ”said Henkin. Floor-to-ceiling windows let a lot of light into the living area. The house is modern in design, tucked away in an area with mature trees and diverse architecture. The Henkins have gotten close to their neighbors. And they enjoy the walking distance to cafes, a cinema, the library and more. “It’s a great community, and everything you need is really, within walking distance, or very, very close by,” said Henkin. Billy Coburn is an urban real estate agent at Better Homes and Gardens. He has represented several new rowhome-style projects. Coburn said there is a resurgence in the development of row houses and townhouses in Omaha that the city has not seen since the early 2000s can enter any area of ​​the city, particularly with entertainment district destinations, “Coburn said. Coburn said all units of the 49th and Farnam, where the Henkins live, sold before the project was even built. “We’ve had a lot of appeal here for Dundee, from families who grew up here and have come back to families who aren’t new to the area Home, and they have decided that it would be their future home too, for their children too, “he said. Coburn said the limited population and the desire to live in urban core neighborhoods are not the only factors that drive sales of these homes. Some find the new build and low maintenance attractive. Coburn pointed to another project at 64th and Center, which has also been completely sold. He also represents a project under construction in the Blackstone neighborhood, where six townhouses are planned in 38th and Dewey. “There is demand for all price ranges,” said Coburn. In addition to consumer demand, Coburn noted that the city of Omaha has urban density programs designed to bring these types of homes near transit routes. He also said that this type of house can be cheaper. “The inventory is low and the cost of land is high and the cost of construction is extremely high, so there tends to be more townhouses built than condominiums. Because once you throw an elevator into a small residential complex, the cost increases,” said Coburn. According to Omaha’s planning department, in 2019 the city received 52 building permits for single-family houses – like townhouses – in 2020 that number rose to 118 and by 2021 there are 177. Coburn said the riverside revitalization will only add, “There are numerous new developments that are being introduced and released, and that is going to have a huge impact on Omaha, “he said. As for the Henkins, from the house itself to the neighborhood, that choice was easy to make. “You could feel that when we moved in,” said Henkins.

Joe Henkin and his wife love their Dundee townhouse.

“You have trees, you have a lot of sun. It’s a great place, ”said Henkin.

Floor-to-ceiling windows let a lot of light into the living area.

The house is modern in design, tucked away in an area with mature trees and diverse architecture.

The Henkins have become close to their neighbors. And they enjoy the walking distance to cafes, a cinema, the library and more.

“It’s a great community, and everything you need is really, within walking distance, or very, very close by,” said Henkin.

Billy Coburn is an urban real estate agent at Better Homes and Gardens. He has represented several new rowhome-style projects.

Coburn said there is a resurgence in row house and row house development in Omaha that the city has not seen since the early 2000s.

“You are starting to see that our market is really on fire, maximizing land use for the number of residents they can get in an area of ​​the city, especially with entertainment destination areas,” Coburn said.

Coburn said all units of the 49th and Farnam, where the Henkins live, were sold before the project was even built.

“We’ve had a lot of appeal for Dundee here, from families who grew up here and are returning. We also have families who couldn’t find a new home in the area and they’ve decided that this is their future.” at home, for their children too, “he said.

Coburn said the limited inventory and desire to live in urban core neighborhoods aren’t the only factors driving sales of these homes.

For some, the new building and the low maintenance requirements are attractive.

Coburn pointed to another project at 64th and Center that is also fully sold.

He also represents a project under construction in the Blackstone neighborhood, where six townhouses are planned in 38th and Dewey.

“There is demand for all price ranges,” said Coburn.

In addition to consumer demand, Coburn noted that the city of Omaha has urban density programs designed to bring these types of homes near transit routes.

He also said that this style of living can be more cost effective.

“The inventory is low, the land costs are high and the construction costs are extremely high, so more townhouses and terraced houses are being built than condominiums. Because once you throw an elevator into a small apartment complex, you add to the cost, “Coburn said.

According to the Omaha Planning Department, the city received 52 building permits for single-family homes – such as townhouses – in 2019.

In 2020 this number jumped to 118 and by 2021 there will be 177.

Coburn said the riverbank revitalization will only add to the momentum.

“There are numerous new developments that are being introduced and released and that will have a huge impact on Omaha,” he said.

As for the Henkins, from the house itself to the neighborhood, that choice was easy to make.

“You could feel it when we moved in,” said Henkins.

Omaha teenager elevating cash for worldwide vaccine program

OMAHA, Neb. (WOWT) – An Omaha teenager is the spearhead Fundraiser She hopes global efforts to get vaccines to low-income countries around the world will have an impact.

For months, countries like Ghana, Honduras, El Salvador and others in Asia, Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean have received millions of vaccine doses through the COVAX Program.

“COVAX was founded by WHO and UNICEF to deliver and distribute vaccines to low-income countries that cannot afford them,” said 13-year-old Siri Doddapaneni.

She found out about the COVAX program in late 2020 and didn’t think about it until she overheard her mother’s conversation in mid-April.

“When this second wave took India by surprise, I heard my mother try on the phone to face the struggles of our family and friends and others we knew in India, and I realized that I really wanted to do something to benefit others To help people during the time pandemic, “said Doddapaneni.

Then she did what some didn’t want – she put her thoughts into action and decided to raise money for the COVAX program, which helps vaccinate millions of people who might otherwise not receive the vaccine.

It is one thing that Doddapaneni is passionate about.

“I got the vaccine as a teenager, and I wanted to use this privilege to help other people because frontline workers and health workers in other countries couldn’t even get access to the vaccine because their countries couldn’t can.”

The aspiring freshman at Brownell Talbot Prep donated $ 300 of her own money to start the fundraiser. Her original goal was $ 5,000, but after that goal was exceeded, Doddapaneni raised it to $ 6,000.

Doddapaneni’s friends, family, and neighbors have all donated to the cause, along with complete strangers on the GoFundMe Page she began. As of Thursday evening, the total was more than $ 6,300.

“I’ve learned that if you want something, you have to ask because people are ready to help.”

Doddapaneni also had the opportunity to advance her case to a global organization that agreed to make a contribution that brought the total closer to $ 11,000. Every cent goes to the COVAX program.

“I am very happy that I can do something that can help so many other people and save so many lives.”

Doddapaneni believes that through global collaboration, we will finally defeat COVID-19 and return to normal life around the world.

“Remember that the world is a family, everyone has to be there for everyone, and everyone has to help everyone,” the teenager said. “Also remember that no one is safe until everyone is safe, and do everything in your power to get people vaccinated.”

Doddapaneni says she is currently working with the necessary parties to transfer the money in due course. She plans to continue raising funds for the COVAX program through mid-July. She encourages people to visit her GoFundMe and donate whatever they can.

Copyright 2021 WOWT. All rights reserved.

Nichols: Tennessee vs. Texas units desk for Wild West-style showdown in Omaha

OMAHA, Neb. – A lonely tumbleweed blows across the landscape. Wind howls in the distance. Spores clink in the dust.

We knew it could happen sometime in this year’s College World Series, also known as The Greatest Show on Dirt.

And now the showdown is here: Tennessee vs. Texas.

Hand to hand. One UT vs. the other UT. Winner continues, loser goes home.

By then, you’ve heard all the fuss (and probably some more) about today’s matchup.

But the point cannot be overstated: No. 3 Tennessee vs. No. 2 Texas is going to be a grudge match. A life and death struggle. A horny afternoon (pun intended) between two of the best teams and most electric fan bases in college baseball.

So before we dive into the analysis, here are a few interesting off-field comparisons and edges that will get you into today’s first pitch (1 p.m. CT, ESPN).

PMS 151 vs. Texas Burnt Orange

Let’s start with the obvious: the orange comparison.

Now let’s get that out of the way: I’ll admit my nursery was burned orange for a while. And i liked it.

Tennessee Orange doesn’t work on four walls. It’s too “out there”, at least for my 8 year old taste.

But in uniforms? This orange pops like nothing else in the country.

That makes Tennessee unique when compared to the longhorns’ interesting mix of red, yellow, and mud brown.

This is what makes the “Vols” script so cute, regardless of whether the script is set in white on a bright orange jersey or emblazoned in orange on what is perhaps the best cream-colored uniform in baseball (sorry, braves).

Overall, Tennessee’s PMS 151 is one of the greatest colors in any sport, and I think Nike’s designers would agree with that.

So it’s this bright orange – at least when combined with the stadium-moving, well-traveled, SEC-tested fans of the Vols – that gave Tony Vitellos Club our first off-field advantage.

Famous alumni

Second, we come to the alumni chapter.

No, not that group of people you meet up with every week to cheer your team on from a random bar in a town you moved to for work.

I’m talking about the part of this column where we look at another notable comparison between these schools: the famous graduates.

And the lists are pretty impressive.

For Tennessee we start with Peyton Manning. Aptly known as “The Sheriff,” Manning is an NFL Hall of Famer, vol-legend, voice communications graduate, and 1997 Heisman winner – for those who are not Charles Woodson.

Manning is also known for saying a lot of “Omaha” – especially when he was with the Broncos – and the GIF was used a lot last Sunday when Tennessee took its place in You-Know-Where.

Manning even made a hilarious appearance on a Tennessee video last week, correcting Tony Vitello on how to correctly pronounce the name of the CWS host city.

But where does it not have to appear? TD Ameritrade Park, especially on Tuesday afternoons – at least if Tennessee wants to win.

In recent years, Manning – while popular across the Volunteer State – has been notoriously associated with the Vols losing when he’s in the stands.

While alumni status is great and Manning has done way more than his fair share for the University of Tennessee, I think fans won’t want him anywhere near Nebraska anytime soon.

Aside from Manning, another famous Tennessee alum is ESPN personality Paul Finebaum.

Of course, Finebaum cut his teeth off at the Tennessee student newspaper The Daily Beacon before graduating with a political science degree in 1978.

He has since skyrocketed to become arguably the most famous SEC soccer personality of all time, as well as the most hated man in the state of Alabama.

For Texas, no name is synonymous with the Longhorns as Mr. “Alright, Alright, Alright” himself, Matthew McConaughey.

As an actor, McConaughey made his first breakthrough in 1993 comedy Dazed and Confused. He followed in a few other supporting roles before starring as Jake Brigance, a small town attorney, in the film adaptation of John Grisham’s A Time to Kill. This book is still one of my favorites, and McConaughey was phenomenal.

He has since starred primarily in romantic comedies and received an Emmy nomination for his role in True Detective.

But McConaughey did a lot more than just acting, as evidenced by his role as “Minister of Culture” on the 40 acres. What does this role include? I’m not totally sure.

However, I’m sure Texas will continue to give the green light – also the name of McConaughey’s insightful 2020 novel, see what I did there? – for every idea sparked by its most electrifying, versatile alumnus.

In addition to McConaughey, Laura Bush and Owen Wilson are two other famous Texas alums.

I really couldn’t decide which one, so I went for both. While it’s probably not a good thing that I have a hard time choosing between a former first lady and a blonde actor whose most famous word is “wow”.

Anyway, let’s get into that.

Bush has a master’s degree in Texas, technically, as she received her bachelor’s degree from SMU before graduating with a library science degree in Austin.

She married former President George W. Bush in 1977 and, as the First Lady of Texas, focused on health, education, and literacy initiatives.

As the First Lady of the United States, Bush did even more. She continued her brand interests of education and literacy by doing the annual National book festival in 2001 to promote global education. She also campaigned for women and represented the United States on disease-related international travel.

She has made several other public appearances since leaving the White House, most recently at the inauguration of President Joe Biden in 2021.

As mentioned, Wilson’s best-known word is monosyllabic. But he’s done a lot more in his illustrious comedic career.

Wilson, an American actor, producer, and screenwriter, received an Oscar nomination for the 2001 film Royal Tanenbaums. He also starred in the 2011 film Midnight in Paris – another good one if you haven’t seen it before – and was nominated for a Golden Globe Award.

Wilson’s more famous comedic roles can be seen in the series Wedding Crashers, You, Me & Dupree (grossly underrated), The Internship and The Night at the Museum.

Wilson was also moved to tears in Marley & Me and became America’s most popular racing car in his role as the voice of Lightning McQueen in the Cars series.

These are also just a few alumni from each school. But just like in his days against Florida, Peyton Manning can’t win here. Texas takes this off-field edge through a landslide.

Remember the Alamo

They needed to know it was coming, even though it and the other two criteria listed above did not affect the end result of today’s game.

If your high school history teachers were as good as me, you know the story. But here we go anyway.

In November 1835, Davy Crockett and 30 other men drove west to Texas. They stopped in Jackson, Tennessee, and moved on to Little Rock before arriving in Lone Star State in early 1836.

On February 8, Crockett arrived at the Alamo Mission. A little over two weeks later, General Antonio López de Santa Anna led soldiers in a siege of the building.

On February 25, over 200 Mexican soldiers posed outside the walls of the Alamo before firing at will. Crockett and Company returned the favor and sent the Mexican soldiers into retreat after a 90-minute battle.

Another battle took place on March 6, in which Crockett died valiantly defending the Alamo when Mexican soldiers took control.

Santa Anna was finally captured during the Battle of San Jacinto in 1836 when Texas forces shouted “Remember the Alamo!” Sam Houston then forced Santa Anna to sign an agreement that would end hostilities.

This agreement also marked the first steps in Texas’ independence from Mexico. Texas officially became the 28th state in the Union in December 1845, though formalities weren’t completed until 1846.

So the Tennessee Volunteers helped save Texas and gave the Vols today’s final off-field advantage.

The essentials: insights into the field

If you’ve come this far, congratulations. You are finally on the important part.

While the above comparisons are all fun, what really matters is what happens between the white lines.

And this is where Tennessee takes advantage of the final advantage in this column.

Yes, Texas (47-16) will be furious if there is a heartbreaking 2-1 loss to the state of Mississippi on Monday night. Yes, Texas outlasted one of college baseball’s favorite stories in the USF, beating the Bulls 4-3 and 12-4 in the Austin Super Regional.

But the Horns have also lost three times in a row this season, while the Vols (50-17) are 15-1 after 16 of those losses.

Three of the above 15 wins came in an SEC baseball tournament that began with the Vols losing to a controversial call to Alabama. In addition, Tennessee has six winning streaks of at least five games after one defeat.

The only consecutive declines were against the state of Indiana in late February.

Four months later, the stakes are much higher. Win or go home.

But the Vols have often had their backs to the wall. Just check out these examples from Hoover, or check out Evan Russell’s Grand Slam versus Vanderbilt, Max Ferguson’s Walk-Off versus Arkansas, or Drew Gilbert’s Walk-Off Grand Slam versus Wright State.

So, yes, Vitello was right when he said on Sunday that the Vols are “built for this”.

But the Tennessee manager added that his team “has a brand name to rejuvenate”.

This type of imprinting usually works well on cattle – especially after adding Jason Russell’s fiery statement to WBIR.

“He’s got something burning inside,” said Russell. “I can promise you, the state of Tennessee, that you will do your best in this area.”

See you at TD Ameritrade.

OLLAS ArteLatinx Present Wins Omaha Leisure and Arts Award | Faculty of Arts and Sciences

Congratulations to the Office for Latino / Latin American Studies (OLLAS) ArteLatinX of the UN in El Museo Latino for winning the “Outstanding Group Show” for the Omaha Entertainment and Arts Awards (OEAA)! This award speaks of the hard work OLLAS staff and committee members have put into creating this amazing event.

This event would not have been possible without the support of great community partners and incredible participating artists: Belinda Acosta, Gary Brunzo, Daniel Castaneda, Linda Garcia, José Hernández, Katherine Hernandez-Mayorga, Guadalupe Lopez, Lucia Marquez, Slovenka Murray, Stephanie Niverson, Hugo Zamorano, Aaron Olivo, Ilaamen Pelshaw, Daffnie Realpe, Ricardo Trejo, Karmen Valadez and Bart Vargas.

OLLAS hopes to continue creating a space for the work of Latinx artists, whose work is often invisible and does not offer enough support to thrive fully. ArteLatinX Overcomes these challenges by developing and consolidating a new space to demonstrate the relevance of Latinx artists and create a dialogue between those inside and outside the arts.

ArteLatinX 2019 was generously supported by Humanities Nebraska, the Nebraska Arts Council, the Sherwood Foundation, the Mammel Foundation and the UN Office for Multicultural Affairs.

If you have any questions or would like more information about ArteLatinX, please contact Ana Díaz-Orozco, OLLAS Community Engagement Coordinator at unoartelatinx@unomaha.edu.