Group Basis difficult northwest Louisiana to boost cash for early childhood schooling

SHREVEPORT, La. (KSLA) – After the worst days of COVID-19, the pandemic has exposed some of the injustices of society such as access to health care and the internet and economic wellbeing.

One of the most notable is education.

To meet the basic need for quality education, Northern Louisiana Community Foundation urges residents and businesses to raise funds to provide access to early childhood education programs.

“Early childhood education is critical to a young person’s brain development,” said Kristi Gustavson, executive director of the Community Foundation. “We now know from research that 90 percent of a child’s brain develops before the age of 5, especially language development between the ages of 0 and 5 is crucial.”

The Community Foundation hopes to raise $ 800,000 for early childhood education in the Bossier ward. The organization is seeking generous community members to donate $ 360,000. If that goal is achieved, the Community Foundation will add $ 40,000 and request a dollar-for-dollar match from the state.

“This year the state of Louisiana started a fund to give dollars to communities that raise funds,” said Gustavson.

Earlier, Gustavson said the Community Foundation helped raise $ 1 million for Caddo Parish families to gain access to early childhood education.

“In autumn 2019, 60 percent of the children who started school in the Bossier community were not ready for kindergarten,” according to the Community Foundation. However, the benefits of early childhood education extend beyond the child.

β€œIt also helps mom and dad to go to work or school, and it has economic implications and benefits for the privately run daycare,” explains Gustavson.

Tap here to donate.

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Designer Stephanie Sarro’s nice room displays her cheerful type | House | Spokane | The Pacific Northwest Inlander

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Tephanie Sarro’s Liberty Lake house is flooded with light and underlined by colors, a cheerful yet quiet place that precisely captures the personality of the versatile designer.

Light streams into the large room – her favorite room – from all directions: the glass entrance area, the slide control onto the closed inner courtyard and through a row of rectangular windows that line the upper floor where Sarro has her studio.


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Next color! Dania chairs and a dining table with a live edge sit on an abstract turquoise carpet, a color that is repeated in art prints on the entrance wall, but also the muted blue-green tone of a leather chaise longue. Variations of orange and red appear in cushions, the glow of glued wood ceiling beams, the fox motif carpet in the grandchildren’s playroom next to the main entrance and numerous works of art, including Sarro’s large watercolor leaf hanging over the fireplace.

Her favorite piece – right next to the great room – is a glowing, rainbow-striped quilt that is visible every time she walks through the door, like a beacon.

“It’s called ‘The Hope'” from the story of Noah, explains Sarro.

Sarro’s interest in art and design began as a teenager growing up in the Washington DC area. She remembers designing and sewing intricate outfits for her dolls. Her grandfather worked in a furniture factory that he eventually took over, and Sarro knows that both his ambition and the way he handled furniture influenced her. Her uncle was also an artist, and Sarro’s mother signed up her and her sister for all kinds of courses from a young age: swimming, skiing, cooking, acting, knitting.


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KAYLEEN MICHELLE PHOTO

Sarro was drawn to architecture and attended the School of Architecture / College of Design at North Carolina State University. Her mother’s best friend – a woman – was an architect, which opened Sarro’s eyes. “I thought, ‘I can be an architect and a mother, both,'” says Sarro, who raised four children and taught them at home, all of which are grown up.

The interior design seemed to fit better, however, and perfectly blends Sarro’s interest in art, design and helping others.

She has kept her artistic skills – still hand-rendering all of her clients’ interior designs – and is particularly fond of watercolor. As a young mother she taught art to local children, and later Elizabeth Kincaid’s book Paint Watercolors that Dance with Light fueled her passion for painting. Although she has sold many of her works and continues to exhibit, she did not want to try to make a living from painting. And she’s still sewing and creating bespoke curtains for clients.

β€œI don’t have a favorite style,” says Sarro, whose own home is mostly mid-century modern, while her current projects include a Tudor-style remodel, a farmhouse-chic project, and a craftsman.

It is important to her, says Sarro, that she accommodates customers with her style.

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Recipes: Traditional Southern-style Barbecue | Meals & Cooking | Spokane | The Pacific Northwest Inlander

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When it comes to grilling, Michael Brown prefers pork. Each animal offers two plates with 14 ribs on each side, ranging from the classic spare rib to the “baby back” or slightly smaller ribs. Spare ribs are usually larger and more marbled – fat corresponds to taste – and take longer to cook, but make a tender, juicy meal. Ribs can be eaten as is or easily turned into pulled pork sandwiches.

For the flavor, Brown uses a dry massage that he makes himself, and like most grill masters, he doesn’t ditch the merchandise on his “secret” sauce (see Spiceology or Michlitch Spice Company for local dry massage options).

Dry massages add flavor and usually contain garlic and onions, as well as spices like cayenne pepper or chilli, a little salt, and sugar to caramelize the surface of the meat. Brown shows, however, that sugar isn’t part of his mix; Instead, he relies on careful “slow” cooking in the smoker over delicately spiced apple wood to caramelize the ribs.

Not a smoker? No problem. You can also cook this dish in the oven and it will still be plenty tasty, says Brown.

Spare ribs

Cut ribs between the bones.

Thoroughly rinse the ribs under cold water and pat dry.

Rub the meat with dry rub and work on the entire exposed surface.

Cover and leave the grated ribs to marinate in the refrigerator overnight.

Get your smoker up to 275 degrees.

Smoke the meat for 3 hours, 10 minutes. No stapling is required.

Serve immediately or let rest and continue to absorb flavor, then reheat as needed.


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Pulled Rib Sandwich

Peel the rib off the already cooked rib and use your fingers or two forks to mince it into thread-like pieces.

In a saucepan, add enough of your favorite barbecue sauce to moisten and stir the meat.

Set the heat to medium and add a tablespoon of water at a time to keep the meat moist. The sauce will thicken as it heats, so pay close attention to this. Heat to 175 degrees.

Spread it on toasted hoagie or hamburger buns and add your favorite toppings: pickles, coleslaw, onions, etc.

– Recipes courtesy of Michael Brown from Fresh Soul