Serving type with a aspect of shenanigans – Shannonigan’s Hair Shack opens its doorways | Information

TERRE HAUTE, Ind. (WTHI) – There’s a new salon in town, and it’s serving up style with a side of gimmicks!

Shannonigan’s Hair Shack had its grand opening on Saturday! It is located in the city center of Haute in Terre Haute!

The salon offers cuts, colors, perms, waxes and cosmetic services.

Lifelong stylist Shannon Daughtery had been considering opening a salon for years, and she says the stars have finally aligned…

“It’s very emotional, exciting, overwhelming, all — all at the same time,” Daughtery said.

The salon is currently looking for hairstylists and barbers interested in working in a fun environment!

Life and elegance with Erin Hicks – Sooke Information Mirror

– Words by Lia Crowe Photography by Darren Hull

The definition of good style means for Erin never trying to be someone else, knowing yourself and letting your own personality shine through in your style.

“My mom always had great style,” says Erin. “She always looks great no matter what she’s doing. She has greatly influenced my style over the years. She taught me to take care of myself, to be proud of my looks and not save clothes for special occasions – wear what you want and feel great every day.”

When asked what’s the best lesson she’s learned in the past five years, Erin says, “It’s to take care of yourself. Being a mom of three busy kids can be all consuming and draining, so you always have to make time to take care of yourself.”

Fashion & Beauty

Currently in great demand: Dior Vibe sneakers.

Favorite shoe: My CHANEL boots with chunky soles.

My absolute favourite: In winter I love my SENTALER coat.

Favorite day bag: I alternate between my large CHANEL flap, the CHANEL wallet on a chain (easiest and most versatile), and the Louis Vuitton bag.

Favorite piece of jewelry or favorite designer: Canadian jewelry designer Kim Smiley.

Fashion obsession: shoes.

Accessory you spend the most money on: wallets.

Whether fashion or beauty, the necessary indulgence: a good quality coat is a must.

Moisturizer: Molton Brown Serene Coco and Sandalwood.

Scent: Byredo Mojave Ghost.

Must-have hair product: Living Proof Full Dry Volume Blast.

Beauty secret: lots of water and high-quality care products.

Style Inspirations & Life

Style icon: More of a lasting impression – Princess Diana danced with John Travolta at the White House in 1985 wearing a strapless blue velvet dress by Victor Gem and a pearl necklace. Truly unforgettable!

Favorite fashion designer or brand: CHANEL and Dior.

Era that inspires your style: Modern.

Favorite Cocktail or Wine: Currently in Checkmate Winery’s Little Pawn Chardonnay and Duckhorn Cab Sav.

Favorite flowers: Old roses and peonies.

Favorite city to visit: Paris.

Favorite app: Instagram.

Favorite place on earth: At home with my family.

reading material

What you read online for style: Instagram.

Favorite print magazine: Vogue.

Favorite style blogs: WeWoreWhat by Danielle Bernstein and Inthefrow by Victoria Magrath.

Illustrated book/photo book: Born to Ice by Paul Nicklen.

Last big read: The Silk Roads: A New History of the World by Peter Frankopan.

Book is reading: The Code Breaker by Walter Isaacson.

Story courtesy of Tabloid Magazine, a publication of Black Press Media

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Patrick Vieira unique interview on reworking Crystal Palace’s taking part in model forward of Liverpool conflict | Soccer Information

The move started with a Joel Ward throw-in deep into Crystal Palace territory and ended, 58 seconds later, with Conor Gallagher firing an angled finish into the corner of the Brighton net.

In between, the ball traveled through every Palace player, including goalkeeper Jack Butland. The patient, 20-pass build-up carved Brighton open and while the goal was not enough to win the game, the mention of it still prompts a smile from Patrick Viera a week later.

“I knew it was a nice goal in terms of the build-up from the back, but I didn’t realize in the moment that every player had touched the ball because I was too into the game,” he tells Sky Sports. “It was good to see it back, because it shows the way we want to play.”

Vieira is speaking over Zoom from the club’s Beckenham headquarters, where, over the last six months, he has overseen a transformation. The Premier League table shows Palace in roughly the same position as last season. But, from personnel to playing style, pretty much everything else is different.

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Free to watch: Highlights from Crystal Palace’s 1-1 draw with Brighton

Vieira’s predecessor, Roy Hodgson, did fine work across his four-year tenure, providing stability in difficult circumstances and helping to establish Crystal Palace’s presence in the Premier League.

But the football was functional rather than thrilling and there was an appetite for change. Vieira came in with a remit to overhaul the team and modernize the style and that is precisely what he has done.

Image:
Vieira has completely overhauled Crystal Palace’s playing style

“That was the direction of the chairman [Steve Parish] wanted to take and it is one of the reasons I am here as well because he understood the way I wanted the team to play,” he says.

“It was a risk, obviously, to change the style, and even more when you have that kind of transition of players, where you lose 12 and bring in eight young guys without much experience in the Premier League.

Sunday 23rd January 1:00pm

Kickoff 2:00pm


“So, when you are looking at what was going to be the first 10 games of the season [which included meetings with Chelsea, Tottenham, Liverpool, Arsenal and Manchester City], you see all the elements are there to have a difficult period.

“But with the support to implement my philosophy, and with the togetherness of the football club – and when I talk about togetherness, I am talking about the chairman, [sporting director] Dougie (Freedman), and the staff – we managed to get through it, allowing me to focus on the way I wanted to team to play.”

Vieira shakes his head immediately when asked if the scale of the task at hand made him think twice about taking the job – “I was really excited about coming,” he says – and Palace fans are glad he didn’t.

The 45-year-old, a three-time title-winner with Arsenal who cut his teeth as a coach at Manchester City’s academy before spells in charge of New York City FC and French side Nice, has instilled optimism in the stands and brought freshness on the pitch.

A raft of youthful summer signings, including Gallagher (21), Marc Guehi (21) and Michael Olise (20), has lowered the average age of the side by two years, and while Palace sit 11th in the Premier League table ahead of Sunday’s meeting with Liverpool, the underlying data ranks them as the eighth-best performers in the division.

Do the numbers offer encouragement to Vieira?

“When you look at the data side of things, you can say, ‘Yeah, we should be a little bit higher in the table’, and that’s positive,” he says. “But on the other side, it’s about trying to understand why you are not where you are supposed to be, or where you want to be.

“It’s about understanding and trying to find the things that will make us a better team so we can improve those kind of details to get better results. So, overall, yes, it’s positive, but it’s not enough for what I want. I will always be demanding and wanting more from the players because I believe they have the potential to do more.”

The main areas for improvement are clear to him.

“I would like the team to be more ruthless in both boxes,” says Vieira.

Michael Olise celebrates his goal against Leicester

Image:
Michael Olise celebrates with James McArthur

“That means on the defensive side, but at the same time, when we are winning 1-0 and we have a couple of chances to score the second one, I want us to have that kind of ruthlessness to score the goal that would allow us to go two ahead.

“It is about having a maturity, and that comes with experience. Hopefully, in the second half of the season, it will be one of the areas we really improve, but it does take time to get to that.”

Vieira’s philosophy is vital to him. “I knew that if I decided to go into coaching,” he says, “this would be how I would like to see my teams play, because when I go to watch matches, I like this kind of intensity, possession and trying to play forward and score goals.”

But he is a pragmatist too. In October, he steered Palace to a 2-0 win at Manchester City with just 32 per cent possession. On Sunday against Liverpool, he knows they will need to be flexible again.

“The goal against Brighton is good because it highlights the way we want to play, but we are not going to score goals like that every weekend,” he says. “We need to understand that scoring in different ways is as important as scoring in that way.

“It’s important to be consistent with style, but at the same time it’s important to have the right gameplan depending on the team you are going to play. Obviously, if you want to have possession when you play against Manchester City, for example, you know that is… not impossible, but really difficult.

“So it is about knowing that and saying, ‘What are we going to do instead?’ That is another side of the game we need to improve as well, when we don’t have the ball.

“That is something we have to learn and we have to put more emphasis on that because those kinds of teams have the philosophy and the players, so it will be difficult to match them on that side.

“I’m not telling you we are going to change our philosophy, but we have to take into account the strength and the quality of the opposition team.”

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Liverpool manager Jurgen Klopp praises Patrick Vieira’s impact at Palace

That certainly applies to Palace’s next opponents.

Liverpool’s 2-0 win over Vieira’s former club Arsenal on Thursday in the Carabao Cup semi-final showed they remain a formidable proposition even without Mohamed Salah and Sadio Mane but Crystal Palace will at least have the visceral support of a bouncing Selhurst Park behind them.

Under Vieira, they have accrued 71 per cent of their Premier League points there, and only lost twice – to Aston Villa and West Ham – in all competitions. The connection between fans and players feels stronger than ever this season.

“It’s massively important,” says Vieira. “Since I’ve been here, I really understand the relationship between the fans and the club and the players. There is a passion, there is caring, there is really a love that the fans show to the players, and I believe it is massively important for the players, staff and everyone to show that love back.

Conor Gallagher, Crystal Palace

Image:
Conor Gallagher has become a fans’ favorite among Palace supporters

“One of the ways we can do that when we are on the field is to play with passion and love and determination, because those fans deserve that.”

Vieira uses Gallagher as an example. The Chelsea loanee has earned plaudits for his goals and assists this season but it is his work rate that has most endedeared him to the fans, according to his manager.

“I think the way that Conor plays reflects really well that connection we have with the fans,” says Vieira. “This is one of the reasons why he is one of the fans’ favorites as well. Those qualities are what our fans love, when players on the field play with enthusiasm, with happiness.

“Of course, they understand the game too. They know that making mistakes, passing the ball at the wrong time, is a part of the game. But what they want is for the players to play with soul and heart. I think they have been doing that fantastically well.”

Watch Crystal Palace vs Liverpool live on Sky Sports Premier League from 1pm on Sunday; kick off 2pm

Jim Cramer says he’d purchase Disney after shares slid on Netflix information

CNBC’s Jim Cramer said on Friday he sees the sell-off in Disney as a buying opportunity for investors.

Shares of the media and entertainment giant fell 6.94% to hit a fresh 52-week low during the session. However, the “Bad Money” Host said he won’t shy away from the stock because its sharp decline seemed linked to it Netflix‘s prognosis of Subscriber growth slowdown.

Netflix’s outlook — offered Thursday night when the company reported its earnings — spooked investors, and the company’s shares plunged 21.8% on Friday.

“I want to own the stocks of longtime, great Americans who have fallen into a guilt fiasco, and that’s exactly what happened to Disney stock today,” Cramer said, while noting that he was prevented from adding to his shares Charitable Trust on Friday changed Disney’s position after mentioning the stock on morning TV. Cramer’s ethics policy is that he waits 72 hours before executing a trade in any stock that he discusses on CNBC’s television programs.

Cramer’s trust Bought back from Disney in September, about three months after leaving his position entirely for the first time in 16 years. Confidence was added to the stock end of November and then back in December.

Cramer admitted on Friday that he was “too early” at Disney, alluding to the fact that the stock is trading lower than when the trust made its purchases.

“But it’s time to mix speculative stories with investment-grade stories. A lot of the stocks wiped out here belong to companies that don’t have much in the way of earnings, companies that trade mostly on hype or hope,” Cramer said.

He said he sees a number of speculative assets — including cryptocurrencies and stocks that went public through a reverse merger with a special purpose vehicle — that deserve to fight now as Wall Street braces for likely Federal Reserve rate hikes .

“But you can’t just extrapolate the weakness of a company that’s done very well, Netflix, with a whole bunch of other big brand name companies that make amazing products and make good revenue, like Disney,” Cramer said.

“I’m not saying Netflix isn’t worth owning. At a certain price, it sure will,” he added. “What I’m saying is that there are a lot of quality companies that are in distress because of Netflix today, and these were the best ones to buy.”

Join Now that the CNBC Investing Club follows Jim Cramer’s every move in the market.

Gael Berry seems to exit in fashion | Information, Sports activities, Jobs

Messenger photo by Britt Kudla: St. Edmond’s Elly Berry competing in the Girls State Tournament in Coralville last year.

CORALVILLE — As a wrestler at St. Edmond, Elly Berry has one final goal: reach the medal tally.

Berry (130 pounds) will compete in her third and final state tournament this week and is attempting to become the first Gael wrestler to win a medal.

The competition begins Friday at the Xtream Arena in Coralville. The action starts at 10 a.m

“This will be my third state tournament and I’m excited to see how it goes,” said Berry. “I’m ready to compete and be back down there (with the atmosphere).

“My goal for this final lap is to be on the podium on Saturday.”

Berry has a 5-1 record this season.

“This season has felt super fast,” said Berry. “I didn’t fight much but I feel pretty good about my chances.

“Since it’s my last time there, I really want to do well and prove to myself and others that good things can happen with practice.”

St Edmond’s trainer Eugene Carlson knows what Berry is capable of and what she’s shooting at.

“She should aim high,” Carlson said. “Elly knows what she’s capable of and she needs to step up.

“We spent some time talking about it and I told her she had to leave it all out there. She’ll never get high school wrestling back.”

St Edmond’s Andee Barwin (105) will also compete for the Gaels.

Humboldt

Maria Elizondo made a statement for Humboldt at the state meeting last season.

She’s clearly looking for more this year.

Elizondo reached the semifinals before coming up short. She recovered with two falls in a row, giving her five falls in competition and a bronze medal.

Elizondo is 12-1 this season.

Elizondo (170) is joined by 10 Wildcat teammates who will try to make some noise in Coralville.

“Maria stepped up at that point,” said first-year head coach Andy Newell. “She has filled the position of (the graduate) Kendal Clark (a former state champion and runner-up).

“She’s fourth and wants to compete in a loaded weight class with two champions and one runner-up ahead of her.”

Seniors Brett Harklau (5-3 at 120) and Adalynn Lawman (4-7 at 130) and juniors Baylie Beers (10-3 at 125) and Ashlynn Sutterfield (3-9 at 135) will be in action for Humboldt.

Sophomores Lexi Roberts (2-12 at 125), Claire Weydert (6-10 at 130), Kenzie McMahon (3-11 at 130) and Rylee Coyle (3-3 heavyweight).

In their first state meeting, freshmen Sophia Harris (6-3 at 105) and Ava McIntire (2-7 at 120) will compete.

“We’ve had our ups and downs this year,” Newell said. “We lost eight seniors, that’s hard to replace.”

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Life and Type with Mari O’Meara – Oak Bay Information

– Text and photos by Lia Crowe

I meet Mari at an incredible ten mile point house she designed and as we walk around the exterior she is pleased to see the house a little busier now and the gardens more mature and full.

“The part that gives me a huge boost is walking through the finished house with our clients,” says Mari when I ask her which aspect of her work excites her the most. “The facial expression is priceless!”

Straightforward and to the point, Mari says the trait she possesses that has led to her success is to “keep going.”

When asked what is the best life lesson she’s learned, she says, “Life is too short, so seize the moment.”

When it comes to style, Mari laughs and says her personal style is “boring”.

She adds, “I long to be elegantly simple, but with a young family and a crazy schedule, it would be tastefully casual.”

Fashion & Beauty

Uniform: Elastic dress trousers, sneakers and a simple cotton shirt.

All-time favorite piece: Sloan Pants by Banana Republic – so versatile!

Favorite pair of shoes: Nike Frees, but apparently no longer available.

Favorite day bag: MEC fanny pack. I pack light. It easily slips into my work bag.

Favorite craft: MUJI Gel Ink Pens. I’m obsessed.

Favorite piece of jewelry or designer: White Garmin golf watch. I don’t use it for golf, I just like how big the time appears.

Fashion Obsession: Sneaker with EVERYTHING.

Accessory you spend the most money on: sunglasses because most of them don’t fit my nose.

Moisturizer: Sephora Collection Ultra Glow Serum.

Scent: Herbae by L’Occitane in Provence.

Must-have hair product: flat iron.

Beauty secret: sebum.

Style Inspirations & Life

Style icon: Frank Lloyd Wright.

Favorite artist: My kids.

Favorite Fashion Designer or Brand: Victoria Beckham.

Favorite Musician: The Weeknd.

Illustrated book/photo book: Poetry of Place: The New Architecture and Interiors of McAlpine by Bobby McAlpine and Susan Sully.

Last big read: I recently read the original Winnie the Pooh book to the kids and absolutely love it!

Book being read: Radical Compassion by Tara Brach and Dog Training Revolution by Zak George.

Favorite cocktail or wine: Neither. I only drink Daura Dam beer. Every day.

Favorite flower: peonies.

Favorite place on earth: Hawaii.

One thing that always puts you in a good mood in these difficult times: mountain biking.

Story courtesy of Tabloid Magazine, a publication of Black Press Media

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Grant cash will broaden well being entry in Indianapolis’ Burmese neighborhood – WISH-TV | Indianapolis Information | Indiana Climate

INDIANAPOLIS (WISH) – New grant funds will help improve the health outcomes of the growing Burmese population in Indianapolis.

Franciscan Health says it has worked with the community for more than 10 years. The new funding will enable better individual support.

Around 25,000 Burmese refugees live in the Indianapolis area. According to Franciscan Health, Burmese have some of the highest poverty rates and lowest rates in English proficiency at the national level, and both are often incorporated into medical access. Removing these barriers, the organizers hope, will result in longer and healthier lives.

Burmese refugees made their way to Indianapolis in large numbers about 10 years ago. Many chose to live on the south side of Indianapolis. But coming from Burma, health care was often not a priority or easily accessible.

“Back in Burma there was no health care. In general, medical care was not available. So there is no annual or just general screening, ”said Burmese health advocate Nancy Sui.

Sui is from Burma. She said that access to health care can be difficult for everyone, but especially the elderly.

“Of course there is definitely a language barrier in the community because many older generations don’t speak.”

At the start of the new year, Franciscan Health received nearly $ 185,000 to improve health care. The money will provide culturally appropriate personal support by helping patients gain access to health and human services. Support will also come from Burmese health workers and other agencies, including the Burmese American Community Institute and the Indiana Chin Community.

“Like many Catholic hospitals, Franciscan Health is truly committed to the health of the most vulnerable in all of our communities,” said Kate Hill-Johnson, administrative director for community health improvement at Franciscan Health.

Representatives said the hospital has served the Burmese community since the arrival of the largest groups of refugees about 10 years ago, and needs have changed over time.

“Now let’s look at these traditional chronic diseases that occur in old age,” said Hill-Johnson.

With the list of asylum seekers, the Burmese population should continue to grow. Lawyers said the time has come to strengthen health systems.

Mental health, like some other communities, remains a taboo subject. In addition to the grants, Burmese advocates will increase mental health support.

Drive like a Kardashian, with fashion, in an all-electric Moke – WSVN 7News | Miami Information, Climate, Sports activities

Oh, how about being a Kardashian Jenner for the holidays. I mean, I got a Christmas card, but Kris Jenner, she gave her family a fleet of cars, but not like any car.

These are so cute that you’ll want one for your next beach day – literally.

You are cute, calm, and Kardashian.

The Moke used to be a British military vehicle, but Moke America brought the quirky car back to life as an eco-friendly celebrity magnet.

Todd Rome, Moke America: “Rock Stars, Athletes, CEOs.”

Jackie O, James Bond and Reality Stars.

Kris Jenner just gave all of the kids their own as a gift.

Todd Rome: “Everyone got a different color and it was a lot of fun.”

Must be good!

Todd Rome: “Men love them. The women love them. The kids love them. You know, everyone loves her. “

And we drove to the chic Fisher Island.

Alex Miranda: “This is a very exclusive place and I can tell you, I feel very cool.”

To test drive!

Alex Miranda: “When you drive this car you are totally exposed to the elements if you don’t have the top down here. It’s better than a golf cart; it’s almost like a Wrangler. “

And it’s not all fun! The emission-free cruiser with road approval …

Todd Rome: “The top speed is 25 mph and the Moke can be driven anywhere at 35 mph or less.”

It can be plugged into any household outlet for up to 40 miles when fully charged. Plus, they’re fully customizable.

Todd Rome: “Actually, every single thing on the car can be pretty much changed. You design the vehicle. We build it and send it straight to your home. “

Its small size makes it perfect for the beach, and because everything is electric now …

Alex Miranda: “All you hear is the breeze and the sea and the animals and the birds, paradise. Look at that. Look at that, stunning. “

If you don’t want to blow your music too, the moke starts at around $ 22,000.

Just try not to upset the neighbors too much.

FOR MORE INFORMATION:
Moke America Miami
1 Fisher Island Drive
Fishing island 33109
866-294-1325
mokeamerica.com

Copyright 2021 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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Type and syncopation, regardless of the precipitation – Pasadena Star Information

 

  • Tenessee State University Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’ Bandfest in Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • Tenessee State University Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’ Bandfest in Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • Tenessee State University Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’ Bandfest in Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • Tenessee State University Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’ Bandfest in Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Salvation Army Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’ Bandfest in Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • Tenessee State University Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’ Bandfest in Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • Tenessee State University Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’ Bandfest in Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • Tenessee State University Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’ Bandfest in Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Downington West Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’s Bandfest in Jackie Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Downington East Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’s Bandfest in Jackie Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Downington West and East Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’s Bandfest in Jackie Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Salvation Army Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’ Bandfest in Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Salvation Army Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’ Bandfest in Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Salvation Army Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’ Bandfest in Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Salvation Army Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’ Bandfest in Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • Tenessee State University Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’ Bandfest in Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Salvation Army Tournament of Roses Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’ Bandfest in Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Mira Mesa High School Marching Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’s Bandfest in Jackie Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Downington East Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’s Bandfest in Jackie Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Downington West and East Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’s Bandfest in Jackie Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Mira Mesa High School Marching Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’s Bandfest in Jackie Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Mira Mesa High School Marching Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’s Bandfest in Jackie Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Waukee Schools Combined Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’s Bandfest in Jackie Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Waukee Schools Combined Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’s Bandfest in Jackie Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Pasadena City College Tournament of Roses Honor Band and Herald Trumpets perform during the Tournament of Roses’s Bandfest in Jackie Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Arcadia High School Marching Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’s Bandfest in Jackie Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Arcadia High School Marching Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’s Bandfest in Jackie Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Arcadia High School Marching Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’s Bandfest in Jackie Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Arcadia High School Marching Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’s Bandfest in Jackie Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Arcadia High School Marching Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’s Bandfest in Jackie Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Mira Mesa High School Marching Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’s Bandfest in Jackie Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Mira Mesa High School Marching Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’s Bandfest in Jackie Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Pasadena City College Tournament of Roses Honor Band and Herald Trumpets perform during the Tournament of Roses’s Bandfest in Jackie Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Pasadena City College Tournament of Roses Honor Band and Herald Trumpets perform during the Tournament of Roses’s Bandfest in Jackie Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Arcadia High School Marching Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’s Bandfest in Jackie Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Remo preshow with the Santiago High School drumlins performs during the Tournament of Roses’s Bandfest in Jackie Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Pasadena City College Tournament of Roses Honor Band and Herald Trumpets perform during the Tournament of Roses’s Bandfest in Jackie Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Remo preshow with the Santiago High School drumlins performs during the Tournament of Roses’s Bandfest in Jackie Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Pasadena City College Tournament of Roses Honor Band and Herald Trumpets perform during the Tournament of Roses’s Bandfest in Jackie Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Pasadena City College Tournament of Roses Honor Band and Herald Trumpets perform during the Tournament of Roses’s Bandfest in Jackie Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

The persistent precipitation that pounded Pasadena on Wednesday, Dec. 29, was reminiscent of a midwestern winter — a condition so many of this year’s Bandfest participants sought to leave behind when they boarded their planes to head west this week.

Nonetheless, hundreds of the country’s best musicians weren’t going to let a little soaking keep them from strutting. They headed for Robinson Stadium to kick off the annual celebration of the marching bands and drill teams that will perform in Saturday’s Rose Parade.

Bandfest, hosted by the Tournament of Roeses, is traditionally one of the more popular events in the leadup to Pasadena’s New Year’s Day Parade. But this year’s showcase had to weather concerns over the enduring coronavirus pandemic and a day of relentless showers.

In response, marching bands and support teams from such states as Tennessee, Iowa and Pennsylvania bundled up, dressed down and scaled back performances so they would still be able to strut their stuff at Pasadena City College.

In total, nine bands performed during eight performances Thursday, including:

  • Arcadia Apache Marching Band and Color Guard;
  • Downingtown Blue and Gold Marching Band (East and West editions) ;
  • Mira Mesa High School “Sapphire Sound” Marching Band and Color Guard;
  • Pasadena City College Tournament of Roses Honor Band and Herald Trumpets;
  • The Salvation Army Tournament of Roses Band;
  • Tennessee State University Aristocrat of Bands;
  • Waukee Warrior Regiment; and
  • Northwest Royal Brigade.

Street clothes, plastic ponchos and colorful umbrellas — in the crowd and on the field — replaced the vibrant gameday uniforms usually donned by the bands who traveled hundreds of miles in recent days to march alongside the flower-filled floats that are still being constructed as the final hours leading up to the Rose Parade draw near.

Despite the rain on Wednesday, about 1,000 people attended Wednesday’s event, according to organizers.

The forecast for Saturday’s parade, meanwhile, is for a cold, but dry and sunny morning. No matter the weather, Tournament of Roses officials said this week that the parade and Rose Bowl football game still have the green light — though they are watching the daily coronavirus statistics amid the current winter surge. Los Angeles County reported 16,510 new COVID-19 cases on Wednesday, one of the highest daily totals of the pandemic.

Style amid the soaking

Water forced some woodwind players and pageant props to the sidelines, joining folks like Northwest Royal Brigade Band Director Chris Strohmaier, who shivered in a soaked sweater.

No matter where they found themselves, though, almost all of the Bandfest participants smiled broadly during the performances — even those who were dancing while drenched, clad in little more than spandex.

That’s because, Strohmaier said, students from the small town of Waukee, Iowa have been waiting two years for the opportunity to perform in Pasadena.

“Last year was supposed to celebrate our last year as a one high-school district,” he said, but the coronavirus pandemic postponed the 2021 trip. Fortunately, the town of 20,000 people was able to send both of its high school bands to perform in this year’s procession down Colorado Boulevard.

The rain eventually lightened during the evening, as did the crowd, but those who stayed until the end were treated to the Aristocrat of Bands, a nickname that resonates throughout the South.

Tennessee State’s Sophisticated Ladies and famed Fantastic Four were united alongside nearly 300 of the school’s marching band members to give Southern California a taste of the Nashville’s trademark Music City funk — which will also be on display at Crypto.com arena this week when the talented Tennesseans perform on the hardwood during a Lakers NBA game.

Tenessee State University Band performs during the Tournament of Roses’ Bandfest in Robinson Stadium at Pasadena City College in Pasadena on Wednesday December 29, 2021. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

Complete with booming drumlines and fierce, freestyle dance moves that had the audience screaming, Band Director Reginald McDonald described the performance as one-of-a-kind.

“One of the things about our band is we always try to carry ourselves in a unique way,” McDonald said, highlighting the instrumentalists and dancers who rocked the house just a few minutes prior. “I was a little apprehensive or anxious, if you will, with regards to the way the kids would perform in the weather. But they did a tremendous job, they soaked it all in, everybody got focused, and it was like the rain was a part of the show.”

McDonald encouraged locals to come see Tennessee State University perform during the Rose Parade because bands at historically Black colleges and universities are truly unique.

More to come

Thursday’s second day of Bandfest has been divided into two parts. The first round will begin at 10 a.m. and feature one of the teams who will represent the Big 10 and Pac 12 in this weekend’s Rose Bowl game. The next round begins promptly at 2 p.m. and will include the other university set to play in the “Granddaddy of ‘Em All.” (Which Rose Bowl-bound band will perform in which session? That still wasn’t announced on Wednesday.)

Experts predict Thursday will be another wet day in Pasadena so attendees are advised to bundle up before heading out.

“You’ve probably all heard the term: It never rains in Southern California,” laughed Robert Shen, president of Bandfest sponsor Reemo. “I think we need to add one word to that, which is: It almost never rains in Southern California.”

Shen, Rose Parade President Bob Miller, master of ceremony Grier Ross and other VIPs took to the field to thank all who attended the “rain-soaked day.”

“We thank the kids. We thank the directors,” Shen said. “And last but not least, all of you folks for braving the rain, sitting in the bleachers, cheering these kids on. This event wouldn’t be special without all of you here today.”

No CARES COVID-19 cash for Vigo Well being Dept? | Native Information

The Vigo County Ministry of Health does not have the resources to continue its COVID-19 response after December 31, according to a notice sent to county officials.

Funding from the CARES act was used for contact tracing and contract nurses to administer the COVID vaccine. It has also been used to house COVID-positive homeless people in motels and to provide food to people in quarantine.



No CARES money for Vigo Health?

Joni way



In a letter received by the Tribune-Star, Vigo County’s Department of Health Administrator Joni Wise wrote to the County Council and Board of Commissioners saying the funding process has changed for 2022 but the Department of Health has not been informed. Way wrote:

• The VCHD was not directed to ask the District Council for additional funding for COVID-19 related expenses in 2020.

• The Department of Health was not directed to ask for funds from the Council when preparing its 2021 budget for expenditure related to COVID-19.

• Health Department has not been directed to ask the Council for additional funding when preparing its 2022 budget for expenditure related to COVID-19.

• All applications related to COVID in 2020 and 2021 were sent to the auditor’s office, marked as such and paid from the CARES law fund for the county, not the general health fund.

• It wasn’t until December 16 that the public health department learned that the manner in which claims were filed in 2020 and 2021 for Covid-19-related expenses would not continue in 2022.



No CARES money for Vigo Health?

Mike Morris



Mike Morris, President of the Commissioners, said Tuesday that “there is currently no funding. It will stop on December 31st … It has not been funded.”

When asked why, he replied, “I don’t know.”

When asked if something can be done, he said, “Well, they are doing something. They (the health department) go to the council and try to get money for it,” he said.

Before January 1, according to other district officials, the district commissioners had control over how funds from the CARES law were spent.

That won’t be the case after December 31, Morris said. “Not after the first of the year. It was all going to the general fund … from the council,” he said.

Morris noted that several surrounding counties are not conducting contact tracing.

“You (Ministry of Health) did not apply for funding and found out about 10 days ago. This is not my fault. So I’m supposed to correct your mistake – I don’t understand, ”he said.

Commissioner Brendan Kearns, who is in Hawaii, said the CARES law funds are under the control of the commissioners. Much of this was used to cover overtime for health department workers and to hire contact tracers.



No CARES money for Vigo Health?

Brendan Kearns

However, the question arose as to who is now in control of the CARES Act dollars, and that has not yet been resolved, he said. By mid-December, he believed the county commissioners had full control over those dollars, but other commissioners suggested otherwise.

“I asked my commissioners for a 45 day extension (from CARES Act-Dollar) … after Jan 1st and then we will use that period to figure out where we need to be to make sure the contact tracing is done properly” said Kearns.

Kearns said he spoke with Council President Aaron Loudermilk about a possible 45-day extension of funding for the CARES bill for the public health department.

Given the surge in COVID cases and the surge in local hospitals, Kearns considers it a public health emergency to continue with the Department of Health’s COVID response funding.

“The time is not to stop funding,” said Kearns. “It is the right time to find out what we need to do over the next few months and then create a backup plan in case we see (COVID) spikes again and contact tracing is required.”

Kearns believes there is still a “substantial balance” of funding from the CARES Act that could cover contact tracing for 45 days.

Kearns also said, “There are people in the annex who want the contact tracing to end. I’m not one of them. I will support the end as soon as Dr. (Darren) Brucken says so.” Bridges is the district health officer.

Whose problem is it?

Loudermilk said the district council could not act until there was a request from a department or from elected officials, and in this case none was made.



No CARES money for Vigo Health?

Aaron Loudermilk

The council supported the requested funds for contact tracing, he said. He only knew in mid-December that the funds for the health department would not be there.

“I think it is a function of the Commissioner. They have made these requests in the past to fund this. I think it is up to them to keep doing this,” said Loudermilk. “I don’t know how that has changed. I wasn’t aware that there would be a change. “

The money from the CARES bill “was usually controlled by commissioners,” he said. “In my opinion it still is.” Applications then go to the council, which applies funds.

He was talking to the police station and bridges, he said. He said he hoped something could be worked out this week so that funding “doesn’t die on January 1st”.

Loudermilk advocates continued funding for perhaps 30 to 60 days “until a solution can be developed for how to proceed,” he said.

There is nothing the Council can do this week. “I believe there is an opportunity for commissioners to debit funds and use them maybe next month for contact tracing,” he said.

Commissioner Chris Switzer said there was a COVID-related item in the general fund.



No CARES money for Vigo Health?

Chris Switzerland

Anything over $ 500 should be submitted to commissioners for approval, he said. “I don’t know if a lot of it happened because I’m only finding out about it today,” he said.

But on December 31st: “That line dies even if there’s still money in it. So if someone wants to say it’s still CARES money, that’s just not true.”

As of January 1, there will be no more funds for this money, but the health department will use it to pay for contact tracers, contract vaccines and other items related to COVID.

“I’m not going to say it was bad planning by Joni and the health department, but that should have been found out sooner,” he said. “They should have included it in their budget during budgetary time or they should have … asked for additional funding” from the Council.

Switzer, a freshman commissioner, said, “Maybe it’s my fault for not being educated enough to know I need to keep these funds going through to 2022, not for the Vigo County Health Department.”

The commissioners have no say in approving rewards that would be paid out to county employees in CARES dollars, he said.

He added, “I think there is a lot of misinformation out there.”

About the contact tracing, he said, “I certainly do not want to stop contact tracing. I think it can be turned back quite a bit. We spend a lot of money on contact tracing. I’d rather see it spent on vaccines. “Education or something so that people get vaccinated more.”

Sue Loughlin can be reached at 812-231-4235 or at sue.loughlin@tribstar.com Follow Sue on Twitter @TribStarSue.