Carne asada sushi rolls, anybody? Right here’s the place you will get Mexican-style sushi within the GTA

It was about 22 years ago when chef Luis Gaxiola heard of a restaurant in Culiacan, Mexico that merged Japanese and Mexican cooking, using sushi as a vessel for creative expression. In lieu of raw fish, protein and vegetables would be stewed or deep fried, coiled into rice rolls and elaborately garnished, marrying chile sauces with flying fish roe and kanikama.

“Suddenly it went from one restaurant to dozens of restaurants presenting this style of sushi,” said Luis, who opened Sinaloa Factory in Woodbridge during the pandemic with his partner Marielos Gaxiola. In the past couple of years, this style of sushi has picked up steam outside of Mexico, popping up in cities like Los Angeles and Houston.

“Sinaloa is a very creative place when it comes to food. This is the land of tomatoes and meat agriculture. We are surrounded by agriculture, farming and the sea. So there is always a lot of ideas being thrown on the plate, it is very progressive,” said Luis.

Located along Mexico’s northwestern coast, Sinaloa is the largest tomato producing state in the country and is also known for its fishing industries.

With Sinaloa-style sushi, classic Mexican preparations like carne asada — where beef is marinated and then seared — is rolled with rice, cream cheese and avocado and presented like Japanese sushi rolls rather than served as tacos.

“There are no limits when it comes to this style of sushi, there are hundreds of variations,” said Luis.

Pages of the menu are dedicated to more than 30 kinds of sushi. There’s one with breaded shrimp, cream cheese and avocado topped with thin slices of banana, siracha spicy mayo and chipotle sauce.

“It sounds crazy, but it is the most popular roll,” said Marielos.

There are other dishes that reflect the regional specialties of Sinaloa, such as the gobernador taco: a lightly charred corn tortilla topped with shrimp cooked with poblano peppers and finished with mozzarella cheese. There are a few varieties of aguachile: raw shrimp tossed with lime juice, chili peppers and a half a dozen other ingredients then served in molcajetes. “We are the aguachile capital of Mexico,” said Luis.

Recently, the restaurant added a birria sushi roll to the menu. Birria is a traditional slow-cooked stew of meat with many regional variations that’s becoming increasingly popular in Toronto. Luis cooks the beef low and slow and uses it to top a rice roll stuffed with avocado, cream cheese and chile tornado (blistered Serrano peppers).

“Usually we accompany our rolls with some soy sauce or a chili pepper to accent the flavors,” Luis said. “With the birria dish, we give them a cup of consommé on the side. Some of our guests love dipping each roll into the consommé.”

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New genuine, handmade, homestyle Mexican-style ice cream parlor provides spooky treats

As seen in “Texas Eats” by KSAT 12, Tropicana ice cream serves a taste from the heart of Mexico with fresh handmade ice cream, paletas, fruit cups and snacks in the Alamo City

Everything is made from scratch, including ice cream, paletas, aguas frescas, chamoy, chili and whipped cream on the fresas con crema.

“Our Aguas Frescas are also made in the shop with natural ingredients. Make sure you try them all before you decide on your favorite, ”said Denisse Diaz, General Manager of Tropicana Ice Cream. “We make sure (in the process) that everything we offer our customers is the best it can be.”

On the snack menu, hungry customers can try mangonadas, banana splits, milkshakes, churro splits, fruit cups, nachos with jalapenos and corn dogs.

Since autumn is officially here, Tropicana Ice Cream is introducing its new flavor of pumpkin spice ice cream for all pumpkin spice lovers.

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“This ice cream is also handcrafted with pumpkin puree and our signature pumpkin spice blend, which is sure to make your fall evening a little better,” said Diaz. “I like to eat this delicious pumpkin ice cream with a graham cracker crust and some whipped cream – and boom, it hits exactly the point.”

You can also make your own ice cream biscuit sandwiches. All you have to do is choose an ice cream, pick a topping, and the eatery will roll the biscuit right for you. With so many combinations, it might be a bit difficult to choose, but there is a lot to try.

To get a taste of what the menu has to offer, see below for the wide variety.

Credit: Tropicana Ice Cream Menu

Halloween celebrations at Tropicana Ice Cream

Anyone who visits during Halloween weekend, Friday 29-31 October comes in disguise to Tropicana Ice Cream, regardless of age, receives a free paleta with every purchase over $ 10.

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The store is also hosting a Halloween costume contest on Instagram from October 20-31. Anyone who posts a picture of themselves with the hashtag #tropicanaspookynights takes part in the costume competition.

The rules will be posted on Tropicana Ice Cream’s social media and the first place winner will receive a $ 50 gift card, runner up will receive a $ 25 gift card, and third place will receive a $ 15 gift card U.S. dollar. There will also be prizes for other participants.

The Tropicana Ice Cream is located at 8223 Marbach Road # 119, San Antonio, 78227.

To place an online order from Tropicana Ice Cream, click or tap here.

KSAT’s David Elder has embarked on a new adventure called “Texas eats”, A one-hour program broadcast on Saturdays at 10 a.m. on KSAT 12, KSAT.com and our Streaming app.

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Viewers can “Texas Eats” on Saturday morning at 10am or on KSAT-TV livestream app available on Roku, Amazon Fire, Apple TV, and most smart TVs as well as on KSAT.com, and KSATs Youtube channel.

Follow KSAT 12 Texas Eats on Facebook and Instagram.

The 10 greatest Mexican-style sizzling sauces from grocery shops and what meals to make use of them with

With palates and sinuses ablaze, the Taste team took on a monumental challenge this week: tasting two dozen hot Mexican-style sauces to identify the 10 bottles worth your hard-earned dollars and coveted pantry space .

And it’s fine work, as anyone who has walked through the spice shelves in the supermarket knows. The number of hot sauces that Texas grocers have on offer is seemingly unlimited, with dozens of bottles from around the world inviting potential buyers to whip their taste buds with the painful hot peppers of chillies.

To narrow down this overwhelming choice, Emily Spicer and I, the grocery editor for Express-News, focused solely on hot sauces, which are popular in Mexico and Texas. Think Cholula and Valentina, not Louisiana-style sauces like Frank’s RedHot or Crystal or the Srirachas of Southeast Asia or the peri-peri sauces popular in South Africa – all of which are also abundant in stores in the San Antonio area. (Don’t worry, salsa verde fans. We’ll be taking a close look at the green stuff in a future taste test.)

Of the many hot sauces we’ve tried – oh, it still burns as I write this – some were easy to eliminate because they got too close to fresh salsa. Others were just plain inedible for a variety of reasons, such as poor taste balance, chemical aftertaste, or – worst crime of all – just being boring when the tongue calls for a fiery feast.

With the hard work (and several gallons of water through the hatch) we’re bringing you the 10 best sauces we’ve tried and our recommended uses for each.

Classic buffalo sauce

Paul Stephen / staff

Classic buffalo sauce

This thick, smooth sauce is having an identity crisis in the best possible way. It’s somewhere between a traditional Mexican hot sauce and chamoy, with a robust fruity taste and a hint of sweetness thanks to guajillo chillies and a little sugar. We want a splash of it with fresh fruit, tequila-based cocktails, and micheladas.

Cholula Original hot sauce

Paul Stephen / staff

Cholula Original hot sauce

This sauce based on chilli arbol and chilli pequin is a real classic and has a light taste full of vinegar and spices. It is not only suitable as an all-purpose table sauce, but is also a welcome addition to hearty stews such as carne guisada, chilli and picadillo.

De La Viuda Original hot sauce

De La Viuda Original hot sauce

Paul Stephen / staff

De La Viuda Original hot sauce

This Jalisco Arbol Chili Sauce finds a perfect balance between the flavor of Cholula and the flavor of Valentina and is remarkably well balanced in salt, vinegar and heat with a persistent, slow burn. This was one of our favorites. It’s like a glittering, younger sister of Cholula and deserves pride of place as a hot sauce suitable for everyday use.

From the first red sauce

From the first red sauce

Paul Stephen / staff

From the first red sauce

If you can’t decide between fresh salsa and hot sauce, Del Primo is the bottle for you. It’s a little chunky with seeds of tomatillos, jalapeños, and arbol chilies, enhanced by a lively plant-like taste of onions and coriander. This sauce would be a winner if drizzled on almost any type of taco.

Humble House Ancho & Morita Smokey Tamarind Sauce

Humble House Ancho & Morita Smokey Tamarind Sauce

Paul Stephen / staff

Humble House Ancho & Morita Smokey Tamarind Sauce

A really unique sauce made from ancho and morita chillies, tons of spicy tamarind, raisins and balsamic vinegar. Born in San Antonio, this product is perfect for adding a mild smoky and fruity flavor to quick-grilled or oven-fried meat. It would also be a perfect complement to greasy sour cream or cream cheese based dips and mac and mac and cheese.

Trader Joe's hot jalapeño pepper sauce

Trader Joe’s hot jalapeño pepper sauce

Paul Stephen / staff

Trader Joe’s hot jalapeño pepper sauce

Jalapeños are clearly the star here, with their distinct flavor that shines through. This sauce has a pleasant taste of charred chili skin without becoming smoky, balanced with lots of salt and spice. It’s a versatile sauce that can be used almost anywhere you would use a fresh salsa.

Valentina hot sauce

Valentina hot sauce

Paul Stephen / staff

Valentina hot sauce

This hearty sauce with a strong nose of cumin and garlic is based on puya chillies grown in Jalisco. It’s thicker and less acidic than many of the sauces we’ve tried, with a pretty tame heat. This rounded sauce would be a welcome addition to eggy breakfast tacos or quesadillas.

Whisker Bomb Pepper Sauce Pepper

Whisker Bomb Pepper Sauce Pepper

Paul Stephen / staff

Whisker Bomb Pepper Sauce Pepper

ZZ top frontman Billy Gibbons and his bearded music colleague Tim Montana have teamed up to create this surprisingly personable sauce that crosses the line between cantina and barbecue pit. It contains an unusual blend of spices like mustard, ginger, and allspice without losing its Texas twang. This would be a perfect partner with brisket tacos or as a glaze on ribs.

Yucatan Sunshine prepared habanero pepper sauce

Yucatan Sunshine prepared habanero pepper sauce

Paul Stephen / staff

Yucatan Sunshine prepared habanero pepper sauce

Of the various habanero-based sauces we tried, this version was by far the best with a crisp and lively taste of this particular chilli. It’s very fruity with some sweetness of carrots in the mix. While it was the hottest sauce we fell for, it remains very tasty and would be a welcome flavor boost on grilled chicken, seafood, or any other dish that requires a touch of heat and a delicate floral aroma.

Zaaschila pequin sauce

Zaaschila pequin sauce

Paul Stephen / staff

Zaaschila pequin sauce

While this sauce is clearly Mexican and made with tomatillos and chili pequin, it has a remarkably global flavor profile thanks to loads of garlic, onions, lemon juice, and a large serving of oregano. It is reminiscent of the hot Middle Eastern sauce called Shatta and would be a perfect alternative to chimichurri on grilled red meat, poured over a lamb gyro or drizzled on crispy falafel.

pstephen@express-news.net | Twitter: @pjbites | Instagram: @pjstephen

Eight Mexican-Fashion Lagers We Love For Cinco De Mayo

Nobody should need a reason to celebrate Mexico’s culinary and beverage-based contributions to the world. The nation has one of the most widely loved and different foodways on the planet and its keystone spirits – Mezcal and his more famous cousin, tequila – are finite earned a lot Whiskey levels of global attention. Even Mexican lagers begin to see the shine they deserve.

Still, May fifth has become a de facto day to honor Mexico’s incredible food and drink scenes, and we’re excited to give (and love too commemorate the victory of the Mexican army over the French at the Battle of Puebla in 1862). To this end, we would like to suggest lifting some Mexican style lager beers on Cinco (make sure to enjoy some Imports from Mexico, also!). We’ve broken down eight of our favorites below.

Sun King Pachanga

Sun King

ABV: 4.2%
Average price: $ 9.99 for a six pack

The beer:

You don’t have to wait until Cinco de Mayo to enjoy this crispy, refreshing Mexican-style lager from Sun King Brewery in Indianapolis – it’s available year-round. Brewed with Pilsner and Six Row malts plus a little bravo hops, one sip of this brew and you’ll want to drink it from now through October.

Flavors:

On the nose you are greeted with aromas of sweet malt, light, flowery hops and subtle citrus peel. On the palate you will find aromas of freshly cut grass, sweet granola, pine and just a little bit of hop bitterness. Everything ends with a dry, crunchy, subtly sweet finish.

Bottom line:

Like many Mexican-style lagers, Pachanga is a session beer. It’s light, refreshing, and a great accompaniment to Mexican food or grilled meat.

21. Amendment to El Sully

21. Amendment

ABV: 4.8%
Average price: $ 10 for a six pack

The history:

El Sully is named for one of the founders of San Francisco’s 21st Amendment. It doesn’t pretend to be something it isn’t and announces on the label that it is a Mexican-style warehouse that was “hecho en America”. Brewed year-round with Pilsner, Vienna, and acidulated malts, as well as corn flake, Magnum, and US Golding hops, this beer was made from warm weather.

Flavors:

Take a moment to inhale the flavors of sweet malt, citrus peel, and caramel sweetness before you take a sip. The palate is full of flavors like flowers, caramel apples, granola and a light, refreshing bite of bitter hops. The finish is crisp, clean and soft with just a hint of treacle and spicy hops.

Bottom line:

We dare to find a beer more worthy than El Sully for a day at the beach while eating guac, which is dusted with a touch of sand.

Buenaveza stone

stone

ABV: 4.7%
Average price: $ 10.99 for a six pack

The history:

Stone Brewing is not satisfied with doing what everyone else is doing. So when they decided to launch a Mexican-style bearing, they did it a little differently than his colleagues. In an ode to the Mexican tradition of adding lime and salt to beer, Stone Buenaveza does just that.

Flavors:

Take a moment to enjoy the vibrant scents of crispy, fresh lime juice, sea salt, and a lovely, malty backbone. Take a sip and you’re sure to sense aromas of sweet corn, citrus peel, subtle pine hops, and just a hint of salinity. It all ends with a combination of sweet malts, light hops and a wallop lime.

Bottom line:

If you are a fan of margaritas this is the beer for you. Although it doesn’t contain tequila, the salty citrus flavors are prevalent enough to pair well with birria tacos or mole.

Belching beavers good times

Beaver belching

ABV: 4.8%
Average price: $ 12 for a six pack

The history:

With a name like Belching Beaver, this San Diego brewery can be tough to take seriously. But with beers like Buenos Tiempos, it’s getting harder and harder not to. This Viennese lager is a light, thirst-quenching, and slightly hazy beer that goes well with cheesy quesadillas or any meat you might want to toss on the grill.

Flavors:

On the nose you will find fresh aromas of sweet corn, light grains and subtle citrus fruits. The palate swirls with aromas of sweet malt, caramel corn, light yeast and just a hint of bitter, flowery hops. The finish is sweet and ends with a combination of citrus fruits and subtly spicy hops.

Bottom line:

Aside from the cool label, this is a pretty stripped-down version of a Viennese lager. What it lacks in taste, it makes up for in refreshing chopability.

Deep Ellum Neato Bandito

Deep Ellum

ABV: 6%
Average price: $ 10 for a six pack

The history:

When you think of craft beer, you may not immediately think of Dallas, Texas. But the Deep Ellum folks are trying to change that. One of the brewery’s best options is the Mexican-style Neato Bandito lager. This full-bodied, bold version of the iconic style has a Texan kick of 6% ABV, making it an “Imperial Mexican-Style Lager”.

Flavors:

Before sipping, take a few seconds to soak up the scents of maple candy, clover honey, sweet malt, and subtle flower hops. If you sip this beer, notes of caramel, more honey sweetness and slightly spicy hops become visible. The ending is sweet, fruity, and subtly bitter.

Bottom line:

If there’s just one Mexican-style lager on this list, make it Deep Ellum Neato Bandito. It’s by far the most comprehensive and tastiest offering on this list.

Melvin Heyzeus

Melvin

ABV: 5%
Average price: $ 9.99 for a six pack

The history:

The brewery points out that while this crispy, vibrant Mexican-style lager has an explosive taste, it was actually made for “mortals.” This 5% ABV beer was brewed with corn flakes and Liberty and Zeus hops (hence the name). This very drinkable, refreshing brew is available all year round.

Flavors:

On the nose you will find a nice, sweet corn flavor from the corn flakes, as well as citrus peel and tropical fruit flavors. The palate is full of sweet malt, crispy corn, lime and just the right amount of bitter hop flavor. The finish is thirst-quenching, slightly sweet and ends with a hint of flowery hops.

Bottom line:

Wyoming’s Melvin is known for its IPAs, but you shouldn’t be sleeping in this Mexican-style camp in early May or all summer.

pFriem Mexican Lager

pFriem

ABV: 4.4%
Average price: $ 3.99 for a bottle

The history:

Hood River, Oregon’s pFriem, is known for its high quality beer offerings such as Helles Lager, Hoppy Lager and Pilsner. This could result in overlooking the Mexican style bearing and that is a huge mistake. Brewed with Gambrinus Pilsner, Carafoam, and acidified malts along with corn flakes, lager yeast, and hops from Perle, Czech Saaz, and Tettnang, this is a complex, balanced version of the popular style.

Flavors:

Inhale the scent of sweet corn, dried orange peel, salted caramel and floral hops. Take a sip and you will find aromas of sweet malt, freshly baked bread, fresh corn and citrus hops. It all ends with a nice combination of corn, citrus and sea salt.

Bottom line:

This very sedentary beer seems to be created to be paired with grilled meat and a hot, sunny day. The combination of citrus fruits, malt and hops goes perfectly with a warm afternoon grilling.

Epic Los Locos

epos

ABV: 5.1%
Average price: $ 11.49 for a six pack

The history:

This 5.1% Mexican-style lager was made year-round to be taken to a beach. However, if you don’t have a large body of water around you, this beer, brewed with Weyerman Pilsner and Carapils malt, plus yellow corn, amarillo hops, lime juice, and sea salt, can be enjoyed anywhere you can find a comfortable seat in the sun.

Flavors:

On the nose you can enjoy the scents of light citrus fruits, damp grass, sweet corn and just a hint of flowery sweetness. This full-bodied beer is filled with notes of lime zest, malt, fresh corn and a slight salt content. The finish is a crunchy combination of citrus fruits and sea salt.

Bottom line:

When it comes to sweet, complex, thirst-quenching Mexican-style lager beers, it’s really tough to beat Deep Ellum Neato Bandito with its corn to lime to salt ratio.

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