Will cash from inventory gross sales damage Social Safety and Medicare?

Q. If you trade stocks and have capital gains or sometimes losses after you retire and only one spouse trades, how does this affect your social security and health insurance costs? We collect our taxes together.

– dealers

A. We are happy that you ask.

Let’s start with social security.

If you’re already retired and on social security benefits, the amount of other unearned income doesn’t affect social security benefits, said Brian Scheiss, certified financial planner at Modera Wealth Management in Westwood.

In other words, there is no other threshold undeserved income reduced social security benefits in retirement, he said.

But a couple combined income Can affect how much of the service is taxed.

Couples filing joint tax returns will pay taxes on up to 85% of their combined social security benefits if their joint income is over $ 44,000 in 2021, Scheiss said.

If their combined income is between $ 32,000 and $ 44,000, only 50% of their benefits will be taxed, he said, while if their combined income is less than $ 32,000, none of their benefits will be taxed.

The combined income is your adjusted gross income plus tax-free interest plus half of your total social security benefits, he said.

Bonuses for Medicare Parts B and D increase due to the higher income, said Scheiss.

The premiums increase in certain stages if the modified adjusted gross income (MAGI) exceeds certain thresholds. The higher premiums are known as the earnings-based monthly adjusted amount.

However, he said these thresholds will be based on combined income and both spouses’ Medicare premiums will be affected.

“Income from capital gains and other sources can have an impact Health insurance premiums, but it doesn’t matter whether one or both spouses are trading, ”he said.

Send your questions by email to Ask@NJMoneyHelp.com.

Karin Price Müller writes the Bamboo led Column for NJ Advance Media and is the founder of NJMoneyHelp.com. Follow NJMoneyHelp on Twitter @NJMoneyHelp. Find NJMoneyHelp on Facebook. Sign up for NJMoneyHelp.com‘S weekly e-newsletter.

UC San Diego Well being Earns Excessive High quality Marks, Saves Medicare Cash

The UC San Diego Health Accountable Care Network improved the care of more than 32,000 Medicare beneficiaries in San Diego, Riverside, and Imperial Counties, and saved Medicare nearly $ 7 million by leveraging advanced population health technologies and processes to help Beat quality and cost targets in 2020 based on recently released performance data from the federal agency that administers Medicare.

UC San Diego’s Health Accountable Care Network achieved a 97 percent quality rating on performance measurements ranging from preventive health checks to the use of computerized health records to preventing avoidable hospital stays, Medicare data shows.

Parag Agnihotri, MD, Chief Medical Officer, UC San Diego Health Accountable Care Network.

“Realizing shared savings working with our network of community providers means we can reinvest those dollars in care coordination, information technology, and other care improvements to further improve quality and reduce costs,” said Parag Agnihotri, MD, Chief Medical Officer, UC San Diego Health Accountable Care Network.

“Our success in the Accountable Care Organization (ACO) program is another achievement in addition to our national and regional awards and rankings,” said Duncan Campbell, chief operating officer of the UC San Diego Health Accountable Care Network. “Our success is driven by our incredible providers who work closely with their patients to ensure smooth transitions from the clinic to the hospital, home – or, if necessary, a nursing home.”

The ACO is also focused on increasing the number of Medicare beneficiaries who take advantage of annual wellness visits, including recommended checkups and preventative measures. Integrating performance data into our network enables providers to share best practices and improve care coordination to avoid health problems and repeated hospitalizations.

Duncan Campbell, Chief Operating Officer, UC San Diego Health Accountable Care Network.

As a market-based solution to fragmented and costly care, responsible care organizations enable local doctors, hospitals and other providers to work together and take responsibility for improving quality, improving the patient experience and making care affordable. The Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP) creates incentives for ACOs to invest in public health initiatives by enabling them to participate in savings that they generate after reaching defined quality and cost targets.

In 2020, 517 ACOs serving over 11 million beneficiaries nationwide participated in the MSSP and achieved gross savings of $ 1 billion based on the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services’ methodology for setting financial benchmarks.

“Medicare ACO’s joint austerity program is the country’s largest value-based payment model and a critical tool in moving the healthcare system to better value,” said Agnihotri.

A fact sheet with more information on MSSP ACOs is available online along with other resources.

UC San Diego Health Accountable Care Network includes Perlman Medical Offices, San Diego Sports Medicine, North Coast Family Medicine, Rancho Family Medical Group, Imperial Valley Family Care, and dozens of other groups serving San Diego, Riverside, and Imperial Counties.

UC San Diego Health is the only academic health care system in the San Diego area, providing cutting-edge care in patient care, biomedical research, education, and community service. Our facilities include two university hospitals, a National Cancer Institute designated Comprehensive Cancer Center, the Shiley Eye Institute, the Sulpizio Cardiovascular Center, and several outpatient departments. UC San Diego Medical Center in Hillcrest is a designated Level I trauma center and has the county’s only burn center.

FDA must OK rule giving seniors entry to FDA-approved medical gadgets underneath Medicare

Mina De La O | Digital vision | Getty Images

Dr. Anand Shah is an oncologist and former FDA Assistant Commissioner and former Chief Medical Officer of the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Innovation. He is also an advisor to Morgan Stanley.

Navigating public and commercial health insurance to cover innovative medical products can be a never-ending cycle of bureaucracy.

Medical technologies classified as “safe and effective” by the Food and Drug Administration – the global gold standard for regulating drugs and devices – are not always covered by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, adding the added hurdle for companies Proof of their requirements must be met Product is “reasonable and necessary”.

Unlike medications, which are typically covered by CMS immediately after FDA approval, seniors can only access many FDA cleared or approved medical diagnoses and devices if they can participate in a CMS approved clinical trial. These studies can take years – additional data and a lengthy regulatory process to determine coverage criteria – and in the meantime sustain potentially life-saving medical interventions from Medicare beneficiaries.

A new policy, due to go into effect in mid-March, would have allowed seniors and their doctors to decide whether or not they needed these devices. However, it was postponed along with other pending regulations when the Biden Administration took office. The proposed Medicare Innovative Technologies Coverage Policy, postponed until May 15 for regulatory review, leverages existing FDA legal expertise under the Breakthrough Devices program to identify a limited number of promising medical technologies, and offers these products a short Medicare warranty. granted on the day of FDA approval.

The proposed policy would be a critical step forward for Medicare beneficiaries to make informed decisions about their care.

Currently, the FDA has approved, authorized, or cleared at least 26 breakthrough diagnoses and devices. These medical products include in vitro diagnostic and imaging platforms for implants and wearable devices that cover a range of diseases, including Ebola, traumatic brain injury, severe emphysema, and heart disease.

As an oncologist who helped develop this medical device policy at CMS, I have looked after many patients who have not had access to state-of-the-art tests such as next-generation DNA sequencing as part of a cancer screening because Medicare does not allow them. The same product can often be obtained by the patient through a commercial insurance policy, which many do not get under the Medicare program after aging. As a last resort, the patient has no choice but to pay out of pocket.

Seniors deserve access to FDA-named breakthrough medical devices – narrowly defined by Congress to include the most promising new technologies, such as those that can treat life-threatening or irreversibly debilitating conditions – once the FDA deems them safe and effective.

It is important that the proposed rule maintain the same high standards required by both the FDA and the CMS. In addition, the existing FDA requirements for post-market surveillance will be maintained. This policy bridges the void for patients who would otherwise not have access to the latest FDA authorized technology while waiting for CMS coverage. Still, it encourages researchers to continue collecting real-world evidence of health outcomes that are specific to Medicare beneficiaries.

Patient protection is maintained as MCIT uses existing procedures to restrict access to new technology when safety or efficacy concerns arise.

There is no disadvantage in approving this policy change. Seniors will have more treatment options, and medical technology innovators can work with CMS to carefully examine these patients over a four-year period, generating meaningful real-world evidence to prove that a new device is “sensible and necessary.” “Is Medicare coverage decision and potentially offers more permanent security.

This policy also encourages early investors to support innovation for the most pressing medical conditions as it creates a clear and predictable path – from investing to developing medical products to regulatory review and subsequent patient access.

If the federal government wants to incentivize investment in developing transformative medical innovations and expand choices for our seniors while promoting rigorous evidence generation, MCIT offers a clear way forward. Too many lives depend on it.